Across the Mighty MacKenzie


Retired_Can_Soldier
+6
#1  Top Rated Post
A Final Farewell to The Merv Hardie who served the people of the north for many years, taking locals across the mighty MacKenzie and bringing Big truck North to meet the navigate the worlds longest iceroad:Tibbitt to Contwoyto Winter road. Though she had a man's name I have never been able to think of any water vessel as a man. She was a pleasant ride, running against the currents, in the face of ice flows and low water levels. She worked in the shadow of her successor, quiet and unassuming, but always faithful. It was my pleasure to ride across that great river on this magnificent boat who now sadly sits aground waiting to serve somewhere else. She shall be sorrowfully missed.


In fall she works in the shadow of her successor.



Due to Ice Jams the Mackenzie dropped her last passenger (A Super B Train Tanker) before navigating back across the MacKenzie in low water levels.


In the early morning 9 hours later with water levels rising she returns.


One of the last rides upon her. A night crossing.

 
captain morgan
#2
Cool pics

The 3rd picture almost appears that there is a fire raging in the background
 
Timetrvlr
#3
Great story with good pics! I have a deep respect for all those who serve on our northern frontier.
 
damngrumpy
+1
#4
Nicely done, it sometimes seems a shame when progress dispenses with history
that should never be forgotten
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Cool pics

The 3rd picture almost appears that there is a fire raging in the background

That is the light behind the plume of diesel exhaust . If you look in the next pic you will see up close.
 
Dixie Cup
#6
Yeh, its sad. I agree, the pics are Kool! Periodically I watch a program about the truckers who drive on those ice highways - boy, they couldn't pay me enough to do that! Koodos to those who do and the other people who work and thrive in the Northern Regions. They're better men/women than I am "gunga din!!"

Does remind me when the Dunvagin Ferry was retired after the bridge was built in Northern Alberta when I was a kid. Nothing like having to be pulled up the big hill by a catepiller every winter after disembarking from the ferry because the hill was so slippery no one could make it to the top. Sigh - those were the days....
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Dixie Cup View Post

Yeh, its sad. I agree, the pics are Kool! Periodically I watch a program about the truckers who drive on those ice highways - boy, they couldn't pay me enough to do that! Koodos to those who do and the other people who work and thrive in the Northern Regions. They're better men/women than I am "gunga din!!"

Does remind me when the Dunvagin Ferry was retired after the bridge was built in Northern Alberta when I was a kid. Nothing like having to be pulled up the big hill by a catepiller every winter after disembarking from the ferry because the hill was so slippery no one could make it to the top. Sigh - those were the days....

The new bridge charges almost $300.00 per rig bringing supplies North to Yellowknife. The Ferry was free. Who do you think will be picking up that tab.
 
L Gilbert
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpy View Post

Nicely done, it sometimes seems a shame when progress dispenses with history
that should never be forgotten

It's in the books, so history isn't dispensed with. Around here there are remnants of the old paddlewheelers (the Moyie and the Nasookin) that cruised around Kootenay Lake and the old Anscomb ferry sunk but ain't forgotten. And in your neck of the woods, Penticton still has the Sicamous beached and the clubhouse at the Kelowna Yacht Club is the old Pendozi ferry, or at least it was when we were there.
 
lone wolf
#9
Truck 'er to Tobermory.... Big Cheese is finding her docks a little high
 
L Gilbert
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_Soldier View Post

The new bridge charges almost $300.00 per rig bringing supplies North to Yellowknife. The Ferry was free. Who do you think will be picking up that tab.

Free ferries here, too, for which the Prov. (taxpayers) picks up the tab. Bridge or ferry, we pay for it.
Cool pics, BTW.
 
Nuggler
+1
#11
Nice pics, RCS.

Challenging country.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by L Gilbert View Post

Free ferries here, too, for which the Prov. (taxpayers) picks up the tab. Bridge or ferry, we pay for it.
Cool pics, BTW.

The bridge cost damn near a billion after it was built and torn down then built again. I'm sure a hell of a lot more taxpayer money went into that than maintaining the ferry.

Thanks
 
L Gilbert
#13
Yeah. Periodically there's talk of building another bridge around here, too, usually by transplants from big cities who can't handle sitting still in their cars for a few minutes. The population base isn't big enough to support the idea, though, (I bet there's only maybe 400 people over there). The existing ferry is on shuttle service and at the very most, one might only have to wait 10 or 12 minutes for it and it only takes 3 minutes to cross.
Why'd they tear down the original bridge?
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by L Gilbert View Post

Why'd they tear down the original bridge?

I've heard two explanations. First the original contractor went belly up. The second was that the Engineering screwed up and the concrete used for the original pillars wasn't strong enough to withstand the barrage of ice in the currents. Both are dock talk, unverified, but I've heard no other claim to dispute it.
 
lone wolf
+1
#15
Sub-standard construction sounds like the culprit....

Deh Cho Bridge spans Mackenzie River in Northwest Territories
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

Sub-standard construction sounds like the culprit....

Deh Cho Bridge spans Mackenzie River in Northwest Territories

Yep.
 
L Gilbert
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_Soldier View Post

I've heard two explanations. First the original contractor went belly up. The second was that the Engineering screwed up and the concrete used for the original pillars wasn't strong enough to withstand the barrage of ice in the currents. Both are dock talk, unverified, but I've heard no other claim to dispute it.

Wiki says it was about flaws in the original superstructure. Deh Cho Bridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Interesting stuff.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
+1
#18
It is quite a magnificent bridge though. Here are a few shots I took of it.






And here's a winter shot waiting to board the ferry


Taken from the Ferry in 2012 doing Prehaul for the Ice Road

The MacKenzie



On board the Merv Hardie


 

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