10.5 million dollar compensation offer too Omar Khadr


gerryh
#181
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

$10.5 million, what's done is done.. the Gov't made it's choice and handed him the money.. I'm not so mad about that as I am the a Ontario Judge that blocked a Judgement that was already won against Omar from the family of the deceased medic. That is what pisses me off the most.

The Ontario court didn't block sweet f uck all. All they did was say they wouldn't put a hold on the money as the complainants couldn't prove that the money would surely disappear. At this time, the u.s. judgement has no legal standing in Canada.

The Americans have had lots of time to try and get their judgment recognized here, and they haven't.
 
spaminator
#182
Paul Martin: Khadr case mishandled by a succession of governments
The Canadian Press
First posted: Thursday, August 10, 2017 04:28 PM EDT | Updated: Thursday, August 10, 2017 11:37 PM EDT
HALIFAX — Former prime minister Paul Martin said he thinks a federal payout to Omar Khadr could have been avoided had Ottawa handled the situation differently from the start.
Speaking after receiving an award in Halifax, Martin told The Canadian Press he wishes Ottawa had taken a different approach in the early stages of the Khadr case, but his own government had to work with the hand it had been dealt.
“I think it was a situation that was not well handled by a succession of governments, and I think obviously hindsight demonstrates that,” Martin said in a phone interview Thursday. “Unfortunately, we continued with the precedent that had been established by ... previous governments, and certainly one could argue that more could have been done at that stage, and I wish it had been.”
In 2002, the Canadian-born Khadr was imprisoned in the notorious U.S. detention facility in Guantanamo, Cuba, accused of killing an American soldier/medic during a firefight in Afghanistan at the age of 15.
Martin, who became prime minister in late 2003 after serving in the previous Liberal cabinet, said he feels the Khadr case was on track for a federal settlement by the time he came to power.
“Really, by the time we came along, the courts had already decided the payments were there,” he said. “If your question is if the thing had been handled from the very beginning, then the answer is yes (a payout could have been avoided), but it was not handled differently at the very beginning.”
The Supreme Court of Canada ruled in 2010 that Canadian authorities violated Khadr’s charter rights when they interrogated him there, despite the fact he was a minor, had no legal representation and had been tortured.
Khadr subsequently launched a $20-million civil suit against the Canadian government. That was settled in July when the government reportedly paid him $10.5 million rather than pursue what officials said would have been a costly court battle that the government had no hope of winning.
Martin, who has spent much of his post-government life working on education initiatives for Indigenous children, received the Samuel Cunard Prize for Vision, Courage and Creativity on board the Queen Mary 2 cruise liner at the Halifax waterfront Thursday.
Paul Martin: Khadr case mishandled by a succession of governments | Canada | New
 
JamesBondo
#183
Ok, here is a hypothetical.......imagine that khadr was on canadian soil, illegally tortured, rights violated...........are the CSIS investigators that fly in, and fly out, are they responsible for the violations of rights? No. Are they expectd to be kadr's gaurdian angel/advocate? No. Are they supposed to be diplomats that negotiate on kadr's behalf? NO. Did they torture Kadr? No. Did they have any authority to act on kadr's behalf? No.

So a kadr on canadian soil would have had grounds to sue the government but the CSIS investigators would not be part of the court case? Imo, i dont think they would be.
 
spaminator
#184
Americans seeking enforcement of U.S. judgment against Omar Khadr in Alberta
Colin Perkel, THE CANADIAN PRESS
First posted: Thursday, August 24, 2017 02:35 PM EDT | Updated: Thursday, August 24, 2017 03:21 PM EDT
TORONTO — Canadian lawyers acting for the widow of an American special forces soldier have filed an application in Alberta — essentially duplicating one filed earlier in Ontario — seeking enforcement of a massive U.S. damages award against former Guantanamo Bay detainee Omar Khadr.
The claim calls on the Court of Queen’s Bench to recognize the judgment from Utah, and to issue a “corresponding” judgment in the amount of $173.88 million — the Canadian value of the US$132.1-million American award made in June 2015.
“Given that Canada has substantially similar legislation in relation to civil actions for victims of terrorism, it is entirely consistent with the fundamental public policy of Canada to enforce the U.S. judgment,” the notice states. “There are no defences to enforcement and recognition that operate in favour of the defendant in this case.”
According to the notice, bringing the Alberta action in parallel with the Ontario case is proper “given the territorial limitations of the respective judgment-enforcement regimes.”
Calgary-based lawyer Dan Gilborn refused to discuss the proceedings on Thursday, saying his office was not authorized to comment.
While the Alberta action was filed in early July amid word that the federal government was paying Khadr $10.5 million to settle a civil lawsuit, the lawyers acting for the Americans said they were having trouble serving notice on him.
“We have thus far been unable to locate Mr. Khadr for personal service, although we are aware that he has been residing in Edmonton, Alta., for much of the past two years,” Gilborn wrote Aug. 14 in a letter to Khadr’s lawyers, a copy of which was obtained by The Canadian Press.
One of Khadr’s Edmonton-based lawyers, Nate Whitling, said on Thursday that it would be a waste of time and money to try two identical actions at once.
“It’s two duplicative actions and there’s no point in proceeding with both of them,” Whitling said from Edmonton.
He also said the Alberta action had been filed too late.
Both actions — the Ontario one was filed June 8 — are on behalf of relatives of U.S. special forces Sgt. Chris Speer, who was killed in Afghanistan in July 2002.
Speer had been part of a massive American assault on an insurgent compound, where Khadr, then 15 years old, was captured badly wounded. Retired U.S. sergeant Layne Morris, who was blinded in one eye during the same operation, is a co-applicant.
The applications — like the uncontested civil suit in Utah — lean heavily on Khadr’s guilty plea before a widely discredited military commission in Guantanamo Bay in 2010 to having thrown the grenades that killed Speer and blinded Morris. Khadr later said his confession to five purported war crimes was his only way out of the infamous prison and to return to Canada.
Khadr, 30, who recently got married, has been on bail in Edmonton for the past two years pending his appeal in the U.S. of his commission convictions.
The Americans failed last month to get an injunction freezing Khadr’s assets — including the $10.5-million sources said the federal government paid him — pending outcome of the Ontario enforcement action.
However, in previous Ontario filings, Whitling argued against enforcement of the Utah judgment given its reliance on the military commission. Canadian courts are statute barred from enforcing foreign judgments that offend Canada’s public policy, he noted, and the Supreme Court has found the Guantanamo system contrary to Canadians’ concept of justice.
“Officials at the highest levels of the Canadian government have already stated...that (Khadr’s) detention and prosecution in GTMO offended our most basic values and principles,” Whitling said in court filings.
Americans seeking enforcement of U.S. judgment against Omar Khadr in Alberta | C
 
spaminator
#185
Omar Khadr wants unsupervised contact with his pro-al-Qaida sister, more freedom to travel
Colin Perkel, THE CANADIAN PRESS
First posted: Sunday, August 27, 2017 11:55 AM EDT | Updated: Sunday, August 27, 2017 12:20 PM EDT
TORONTO — Former Guantanamo Bay detainee Omar Khadr returns to court this week to ask that his bail conditions be eased, including allowing him unfettered contact with his controversial older sister, more freedom to move around Canada, and unrestricted internet access.
In support of his request, Khadr notes the conditions originally imposed two years ago were necessary as a graduated integration plan following his 13 years in American and Canadian custody. No issues have arisen since his release and the various restrictions have been revised several times — most recently in May last year, he says.
Currently, Khadr, 30, can only have contact with his sister Zaynab if one of his lawyers or bail supervisor is present. The condition is no longer necessary, he says.
“I am now an adult and I think independently,” he says in an affidavit. “Even if the members of my family were to wish to influence my religious or other views, they would not be able to control or influence me in any negative manner.”
Zaynab Khadr, 37, who recently had a fourth child in Egypt, according to court filings obtained by The Canadian Press, was detained in Turkey a year ago for an expired visa. She and her fourth husband subsequently moved to Malaysia but are now said to be living in Sudan and planning to visit Canada.
“I would like to be able to spend time with her and the rest of our family when she is here,” Omar Khadr states. “As far as I am aware, Zaynab is not involved in any criminal activities and is frequently in contact with the Canadian embassy in order to ensure that her paperwork is up to date.”
Zaynab Khadr, who was born in Ottawa, was at one point unable to get a Canadian passport after frequently reporting hers lost. She was also subject to an RCMP investigation in 2005 but faced no charges. Her third husband, Canadian Joshua Boyle, is reportedly still a Taliban hostage along with his American wife and children in Afghanistan. In 2008, she went on a hunger strike on Parliament Hill to draw attention to her brother’s plight as an American captive in Guantanamo Bay.
Several years ago, she and her mother infuriated many Canadians by expressing pro-al-Qaida views. Omar Khadr told The Canadian Press last month that he saw no point in decrying their views.
“I’m not excusing what they said. I’m not justifying what they said,” Khadr said. “They were going through a hard time. They said things out of anger or frustration.”
Khadr, who recently married, says a college in Red Deer, Alta., about a half hour from where he spent time in maximum security after his return from Guantanamo Bay, has accepted him into its nursing program. He says he plans to leave his Edmonton apartment at the end of September and find new accommodation.
In another bail-variation request the court in Edmonton will consider on Thursday, Khadr asks for an end to a condition that he provide his supervisor notice about his travel plans within Alberta, and that he obtain permission to travel outside the province. Requiring him to remain in Canada would be sufficient, the documents state. He also wants restrictions on accessing computers or the internet lifted.
In May 2015, Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench Justice June Ross granted Khadr bail pending appeal of his conviction by a widely maligned U.S. military commission for five purported war crimes. The appeal in the States has stalled through circumstances outside his control and nothing has changed since his release, his filing says.
Khadr found himself at the centre of a fierce political firestorm amid word last month that the Canadian government, which apologized to him for breaching his rights, had paid him $10.5 million in compensation. He says he just wants to get on with his life.
“I wish to become independent and to put my legal matters behind me,” he says in his affidavit. “I am a law-abiding citizen and I wish to live free of court-imposed conditions.”
American soldiers captured a badly wounded Khadr, then 15 years old, in July 2002 following a fierce assault on a compound in Afghanistan in which a U.S. special forces soldier was killed. Khadr later said he pleaded guilty before the commission to throwing the deadly grenade as a way out of American detention. He returned to Canada in 2012 to serve out the rest of the eight-year sentence he was given.
Omar Khadr (inset) wants unsupervised visits with his sister Zaynab Khadr, who is seen in this 2009 file photo on the left with their mother Maha El Samnah. (Brett Gundlock/Postmedia/THE CANADIAN PRESS/Colin Perkel)

Omar Khadr wants unsupervised contact with his pro-al-Qaida sister, more freedom
 
spaminator
#186
Hearing seeking easing of Omar Khadr's bail conditions cancelled
Dean Bennett, THE CANADIAN PRESS
First posted: Thursday, August 31, 2017 07:31 AM EDT | Updated: Thursday, August 31, 2017 11:42 AM EDT
EDMONTON — A hearing to determine whether bail conditions for former Guantanamo Bay detainee Omar Khadr should be eased allowing him unsupervised visits with his controversial sister did not go ahead as planned Thursday.
It was put over to Sept. 15 after lawyers for the Justice Department said they needed time to consult with the federal government.
“The Crown requested an adjournment to receive instructions,” Khadr’s lawyer Nate Whitling said Thursday. “We agreed and the matter’s been rescheduled.”
Khadr is seeking unrestricted internet access and more freedom to move around Canada while on bail pending the appeal of his conviction by a U.S. military commission for five purported war crimes.
Khadr, now 30, has been free on bail for more than two years and notes no issues have arisen since his release.
Right now, he can only have contact with his sister Zaynab Khadr if one of his lawyers or bail supervisor is present.
Several years ago, Zaynab and her mother infuriated many Canadians by expressing support for the al-Qaida terrorist group.
In 2005, Zaynab was investigated by RCMP for allegedly aiding al-Qaida, but no charges were filed. She is now reportedly living in Sudan with her fourth husband, but is planning a visit to Canada. Khadr is arguing he wants to reconnect with his family and is old enough that he can’t be negatively swayed.
Thursday’s hearing is the next phase in a 15-year legal journey for Khadr that has ignited sharp and divisive debate among Canadians over terrorism, human rights and the rule of law.
The Toronto-born Khadr spent years in U.S. detention at Guantanamo Bay after he was caught when he was 15 and accused of tossing a grenade that killed special forces soldier Christopher Speer at a militant compound in Afghanistan in 2002.
In 2010, Khadr pleaded guilty to multiple charges before a U.S. military commission, including to killing Speer, but has since said he can’t remember if he tossed the fatal grenade. He has said he entered the plea to try to get out of Guantanamo, where he says he was mistreated, and into the Canadian justice system.
He returned to Canada in 2012 to serve out the rest of the eight-year sentence he was given.
Canada’s Supreme Court ruled in 2010 that Khadr’s charter rights were violated at Guantanamo and Canadian officials contributed to that violation.
Khadr filed a $20-million lawsuit against the government and last month it was revealed he had settled the case for a reported $10.5 million. That set off a fierce debate.
Khadr has said he wants to get on with his life. He recently married and plans to move to the city of Red Deer, halfway between Edmonton and Calgary, to begin studies to become a nurse.
— With files from Colin Perkel in Toronto
Hearing seeking easing of Omar Khadr's bail conditions cancelled | Canada | News
 
spaminator
#187
Omar Khadr visits with sister remain restricted, but can use internet freely
Dean Bennett, THE CANADIAN PRESS
First posted: Friday, September 15, 2017 01:06 PM EDT | Updated: Friday, September 15, 2017 03:51 PM EDT
EDMONTON — Former Guantanamo Bay detainee Omar Khadr has been denied unsupervised visits with his controversial older sister who has expressed support for al-Qaida.
Justice June Ross ruled Friday that Khadr and his lawyer, Nathan Whitling, have offered nothing new to allay security concerns surrounding Zaynab Khadr, who is currently believed to be in Sudan.
Zaynab Khadr, 37, has spoken in favour of al-Qaida and was investigated in Canada more than a decade ago for helping the terrorist network, but she was never charged.
She is reportedly planning a trip to Canada, and the rules of Khadr’s bail allow him to meet with her but only in the presence of his bail supervisor or one of his lawyers.
Whitling argued in Court of Queen’s Bench that the restriction is no longer necessary. He said Khadr, 30, is old enough and mature enough not to be swayed by anyone else.
“The passage of time makes a big difference,” Whitling told Ross as Khadr sat behind him in the public gallery Friday. “The idea that someone’s sister will turn him into a different person is no longer a concern.”
He noted that Zaynab “may have made some unfortunate media statements” but there is no evidence of wrongdoing.
Bruce Hughson, a lawyer representing the federal government, told Ross that Khadr has provided no new evidence on Zaynab Khadr’s terrorism views that would justify changing the bail rules.
Ross agreed. She said the restriction was put in place for a reason and Whitling needs to show evidence — besides the passage of time — to justify amending the order.
“The defence has not provided relevant evidence to show a change of circumstances,” Ross said.
Outside court, Whitling said that would require an affidavit from Zaynab Khadr who is out of the country.
“It’s a possibility I suppose,” he said.
Khadr is on bail while he appeals war crime convictions by a U.S. military commission. He declined to make any comment outside court.
Whitling said his client was disappointed.
“He does want to be able to contact his sister and he doesn’t see how he’ll be able to speak to his nieces and nephews without having some sort of supervisor present.”
Toronto-born Khadr spent years in U.S. detention at Guantanamo Bay after he was caught when he was 15 and accused of tossing a grenade that killed special forces soldier Christopher Speer at a militant compound in Afghanistan in 2002.
In 2010, Khadr pleaded guilty to multiple charges before the military commission, including to killing Speer, but has since said he can’t remember if he tossed the grenade.
He has said he entered the plea to try to get out of Guantanamo, where he says he was mistreated, and into the Canadian justice system.
He is now married and is moving to Red Deer, south of Edmonton, to begin earning a nursing degree.
While awaiting his appeal hearing, Khadr has sought a loosening of a number of bail restrictions.
Ross did allow a change to Khadr’s internet use. He had been restricted to personal internet devices and subject to checks.
Whitling argued that the internet is available everywhere on multiple devices — at friends’ homes and in public places — and that there is no way for Khadr to avoid it.
Ross agreed to expand Khadr’s internet use as long as he doesn’t use the web to seek out terrorist propaganda or organizations.
Khadr also needs permission to travel outside Alberta. Whitling said Khadr has made multiple trips to Ontario to visit family without incident and should only have to notify authorities when travelling outside his home province.
Ross denied that request. She said the current approach seems to be working fine without undue hardship to Khadr.
His 15-year-old case ignited sharp and divisive debate among Canadians over terrorism, human rights and the rule of law this summer when it was revealed the federal government had settled a lawsuit filed by him for a reported $10.5 million.
The payout followed a ruling by Canada’s Supreme Court in 2010 that Khadr’s charter rights were violated at Guantanamo and that Canadian officials contributed to that violation.
Omar Khadr visits with sister remain restricted, but can use internet freely | C
 
ZulFiqar786
-2
#188
Omar Khadr never did anything wrong, never committed a single crime. He deserves millions of more dollars in reality. Nevertheless, I’m glad he has got some semblance of justice and hopes he uses his money wisely and doesn’t waste it
 
Durry
-1
#189
He fought against his own country and killed a Medic
 
ZulFiqar786
-1
#190
Quote: Originally Posted by Durry View Post

He fought against his own country and killed a Medic



He did so in self-defense.
 
DaSleeper
+1 / -1
#191
Quote: Originally Posted by ZulFiqar786 View Post

Omar Khadr never did anything wrong, never committed a single crime. He deserves millions of more dollars in reality. Nevertheless, I’m glad he has got some semblance of justice and hopes he uses his money wisely and doesn’t waste it


Probably your idea of using it wisely would be to finance terrorism in Canada non?
 
ZulFiqar786
#192
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

Probably your idea of using it wisely would be to finance terrorism in Canada non?
[/FONT][/COLOR]





Not at all. He should fund construction of more mosques, Islamic schools and anything else to help our community. He is no terrorist, but rather an innocent person that was mistreated because of racism.
 
DaSleeper
+1 / -1
#193
In your dreams....
 
Mowich
Conservative
+1
#194
Quote: Originally Posted by ZulFiqar786 View Post

Omar Khadr never did anything wrong, never committed a single crime. He deserves millions of more dollars in reality. Nevertheless, I’m glad he has got some semblance of justice and hopes he uses his money wisely and doesn’t waste it



The only reason Khadr was given money was in order to avoid an even bigger pay-out should the case go to court. He will be closely watched for the rest of his life due to his connection to his jihadist family especially his sister and I am glad to hear visits with the latter will be strictly monitored.

 
ZulFiqar786
-1
#195
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

The only reason Khadr was given money was in order to avoid an even bigger pay-out should the case go to court. He will be closely watched for the rest of his life due to his connection to his jihadist family especially his sister and I am glad to hear visits with the latter will be strictly monitored.

[/FONT][/COLOR]





Omar Khadr is a great man. I wish him the best. He is very brave and courageous. Btw, he killed the American soldier in self-defense. How is that a crime? In war both sides shoot at each other. That is the reality of war. When a prisoner of war is captured he has rights under Geneva convention. A captured enemy soldier isn’t a criminal. The Taliban are not terrorists, they are a legitimate army that is fighting to liberate their country from American colonial occupation and its puppet government. Canada should completely withdraw from any involvement in all foreign wars that America is involved in. The real terrorist is American military which illegally invaded Iraq and Afghanistan, and is also arming the Saudis to massacre innocent Yemeni civilians. Canada must distance itself from America’s war crimes.
 
lone wolf
Free Thinker
+1
#196
Bloody trolls....

He got off light. The traditional end for mercenaries and spies is tap-tap Taps
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#197
Quote: Originally Posted by ZulFiqar786 View Post

He did so in self-defense.



... And he traveled from Canada to Afghanistan in self defense too, right?
 
ZulFiqar786
#198
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

... And he traveled from Canada to Afghanistan in self defense too, right?
[/COLOR][/FONT]

[/FONT]


What does travelling have to do with anything? He was a pre-pubescent kid and a minor, he couldn’t travel on his own volition.


 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+2
#199
Quote: Originally Posted by ZulFiqar786 View Post

What does travelling have to do with anything? He was a pre-pubescent kid and a minor, he couldn’t travel on his own volition.



Because it was in self defense.


Here's a picture of Khadr baking bundt cakes in self defense.




Say what you will about the guy, but he did bake one delicious bundt cake
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#200
I think that thread is beyond the end of it's useful shelf life.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#201
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I think that thread is beyond the end of it's useful shelf life.

On this we agree.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
#202
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post



Because it was in self defense.

[/FONT][/COLOR][/FONT]
Here's a picture of Khadr baking bundt cakes in self defense.




Say what you will about the guy, but he did bake one delicious bundt cake

Sideburns moustache and beard on a pre-pubescent child .
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#203
Posters who start new threads should take the time to at least make sure the title is grammatical!
 
Durry
#204
Brainwashed jihadists? No, they know exactly what they're doing | MALCOLM | Colu


Canada is a “filthy place” – this, according to a handwritten letter sent by a Canadian al-Qaeda agent to his family back in Canada.

Once a University of Manitoba engineering student, Maiwand Yar left in 2007 and mailed the letter from a terrorist outpost in Pakistan.

The letter recently became public, and is being used as evidence in the American trial of Yar’s friend and former classmate, Muhanad al-Farekh, who is facing terrorism charges after being captured in Pakistan.

In the letter, Yar urges his family to leave Canada and instructs them to stop watching Hollywood movies and North American news stations — “nothing but lies”— and to avoid Western fashion and Canadian public schools.

“Put all the kids in an Islamic school and make the kids wear (a) hijab from an early age,” he commands.

This letter offers a rare glimpse into the mind of a radicalized jihadist. In his own words, he explains exactly what he is doing and why.

The letter goes against everything Justin Trudeau and his friends want us to believe about Islamists, and debunks many of the prevailing myths pushed by those who sympathize and apologize for radical Islamists.

First, the letter provides a calm and clear explanation for why this young man left Canada to join a terrorist army. Yar insists he isn’t crazy or under any illusions when it comes to his hatred for Canada.

Far from the narrative that terrorists suffer from mental illness, Yar emphasizes that he’s made a choice, and he believes it’s the right one.

Second, Yar explicitly says he’s not brainwashed. “It hurts me so much that you believe I left because I was brainwashed and didn’t know what I was doing,” he writes. Yar instead accuses his family and the Muslim community in Canada of going astray and betraying his fundamentalist worldview.

Third, this terrorist is incredibly religious, and his letter is filed with references to Islamic scripture and scholars who promote violent jihad against non-Muslims.

It’s clear he’s a devout and fundamentalist Muslim, motivated by his faith. Anyone who still believes that Islamist terrorism has “nothing to do with Islam” should read this letter.

Forth, the letter is surprisingly articulate – revealing Yar as intelligent and well-educated. His beliefs are evil—based on 7th century morality and militant tribalism—but there is no doubt he possesses a thorough and well-researched ideology.

Finally, this letter debunks the prevailing myth that terrorists are driven by a lack of economic opportunity.

Graduating from a top Canadian university with an engineering degree could have landed Yar a high-paying job. He is smart, and could have had a very good life in Canada.

This terrorist didn’t reject Canada because he had no other options. He made a clear choice.

He believed he was fighting in a war of civilizations, and he was willing to die for his cause.

Jihadists repeatedly tell us, in cogent language, that they are fighting a war to destroy our civilization and to impose their Islamist ideology.

We can either choose to take terrorists at their word, and do something to stop the spread of Islamist jihad.

Or we can choose to believe Justin Trudeau – who sees terrorists as victims, deserving of a second chance. Trudeau said the Boston Marathon bombings only happened because someone “feels completely excluded.” He’s rewarded ex-terrorists – with cash and citizenship.

We can choose to be realistic or naive.

That’s our choice. The jihadists have made theirs.

--------------------------
^^^^ I think this is one of ZulF family members !!

[IMG]cid:40FB4EFF-565E-4246-8CC7-02B3B7AA8CC0[/IMG]
 
spaminator
#205
Joshua Boyle: He's perhaps best known for his link to Khadr family
By Jacquie Miller
First posted: Thursday, October 12, 2017 07:21 PM EDT | Updated: Thursday, October 12, 2017 08:49 PM EDT
Joshua Boyle, now free after five years of captivity in Afghanistan, is perhaps best known for his brief marriage to Omar Khadr’s older sister.
Boyle, the son of an Ottawa tax court judge, was married for about a year to Zaynab Khadr. She’s the eldest daughter of Ahmed Said Khadr, who was accused by the U.S. and Canada of being an associate and financier for the terrorist group Al-Qaeda. Ahmed Khadr studied at the University of Ottawa, and the family moved between Canada, Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Zaynab Khadr was a fierce defender of both her father and her brother, Omar Khadr, who was captured as a 15-year-old fighting with the Taliban in Afghanistan and charged with killing an American soldier.
How did Zaynab Khadr meet Boyle, a University of Waterloo graduate? Boyle had developed a keen interest in national security and human rights issues after the terrorist attacks of 9/11.
Boyle was principled, smart and a “crusader” by nature, said his friend Alex Edwards, who lives in Carleton Place. Boyle was captivated by the plight of Omar Khadr, who was being held in a U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, said Edwards.
“Here was this kid, this Canadian child, off in an illegal American prison, and everyone in (Canada) was vilifying the Khadr family, and Josh decided, ‘Hey, this isn’t right.’ So he went off and devoted several years of his life to help this innocent kid.”
Boyle had no connection to the Khadr family, but introduced himself and volunteered to help them, said Edwards.
Boyle acted as the Khadr family spokesperson in 2008 when Zaynab staged a hunger strike on Parliament Hill to protest her brother’s detention. (After a decade at Guantanamo, Omar Khadr was returned to Canada, and later received a $10.5 million settlement from the Canadian government for violation of his charter rights.)
Boyle married Zaynab Khadr in 2009. He was 25, she was 29. It was the third marriage for Zaynab. The first two were arranged: her first husband was sought as a conspirator in a bombing of the Egyptian Embassy in Pakistan; Osama Bin Laden was one of the guests at her second wedding in Afghanistan.
Back in Canada, Zaynab created controversy in 2004 for controversial remarks she made criticizing the way children were raised here and suggesting that the Sept. 11 terror attacks were justified.
Boyle defended his wife for her earlier remarks. In an email exchange with a Postmedia reporter, Boyle said his relationship with Zaynab had taught him that no one can accurately judge the character of a person they’ve never met.
“Are any of us honestly able to say that we have never uttered any phrases which, if they ran beside our name in the paper every month for five years, would paint an unflattering mental image in the public perception?” he asked, adding, “Let he without sin cast the first stone.”
Edwards said, as far as he knows, Boyle was not devoted to any particular political philosophy. He was a pacifist, anti-war and anti-abortion. “He once described himself to me as a hippie, Mennonite love child.”
Edwards knew Boyle over the course of more than a decade, mainly through an online role-playing Star Wars game. Boyle was a “very private person,” but had a reputation in the gaming world as being both cunning in getting people to do what he wanted and generous to new players, he said.
A few months after Boyle married Khadr, intruders broke into the west-end Ottawa home of his parents, Linda and Patrick Boyle. Patrick Boyle was a federal tax court judge.
Intruders smashed the front door, ransacked the house and left bullet holes in the windows. Nothing of value was taken, Postmedia reported. The Boyles were away at the time.
Joshua Boyle believed the break-in was somehow connected to his marriage.
“I’m sure I don’t have to speculate for you on the meaning of .22 calibre bullets fired from close range through residential windows following an unwarranted break-in by an intruder who left behind all the jewelry, cash and valuables in the house,” he wrote to Postmedia at the time.
“Perhaps somebody is unhappy that the Boyles are highlighting to the public just how human the Khadrs really are,” he wrote. At the time, he was living in Toronto with Zaynab and her daughter from a previous marriage.
The marriage didn’t last long, though. They divorced in 2010.
The next year, Boyle married Caitlan Coleman, a U.S. citizen who grew up in rural Stewartstown, Pa., according to an article in The Inquirer.
The pair met on Star Wars fan sites.
Coleman was home-schooled, according to the Inquirer, which quoted friends describing her as “a woman shaped by rural values, with a big-hearted curiosity about the wider world.”
The couple married while on a hike through Central America, the article said.
In the summer of 2012, they thought they had the experience to handle a backpacking trip to Central Asia, according to a video interview with Coleman’s parents.
Caitlan was pregnant at the time.
Afghanistan was not on their itinerary, so it’s unclear how they ended up there, said the Inquirer.
Boyle and Coleman were used to travelling in places most people don’t go, said Edwards.
The couple had done “freelance aid work” in South America before, so perhaps they meant to do the same in Afghanistan, he speculated.
“We can’t know for sure, but they probably meant to do much the same in Afghanistan and a number of other Central Asian nations,” Edwards wrote in a blog post. “What’s even less clear is why they thought this was a good idea. Joshua has a loose connection to Afghanistan, a deep respect for Islam  —  he may even have been in the process of converting  —  and a purely academic interest in terrorism, but none of that even remotely qualifies him to travel safely in Afghanistan. It could have been simple naiveté, but I, and many others, have always known Joshua as an exceptionally cunning and savvy man. Maybe he was overconfident. Maybe he was immature. Maybe this time Joshua just bit off more than he could chew.”
The couple was believed to be travelling in Wardak province in Afghanistan when they were abducted by a Taliban-affiliated group in the fall of 2012.
jmiller@postmedia.com
twitter.com/JacquieAMiller
Joshua Boyle: He's perhaps best known for his link to Khadr family | Canada | Ne
 
spaminator
+1
#206
Omar Khadr can't avoid civil judgment by recanting war crimes plea: Plaintiff's lawyers
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
January 11, 2018
Updated:
January 11, 2018 5:49 PM EST
Former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr is seen in Mississauga, Ont., on Thursday, July 6, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Colin PerkelColin Perkel / THE CANADIAN PRESS
By Colin Perkel, THE CANADIAN PRESS
Former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr cannot avoid a huge civil judgment against him by recanting the confession and guilty plea he made before an American military commission, lawyers acting for the widow of a U.S. special forces soldier argue in new court filings.
Canadian courts must accept the agreed statement of facts that underpinned Khadr’s war-crimes conviction in 2010, they argue, regardless of whether he lied under oath when he admitted to tossing a hand grenade that killed the soldier eight years earlier.
‘I share that anger’; PM reacts to townhall Khadr heckler
Khadr issue will be an albatross for Trudeau
Liberals punted on 1st down with $10.5M Omar Khadr settlement
GUNTER: Khadr decision shows Liberals soft on terror
MALCOOM: Trudeau rewards a terrorist with citizenship
“No court anywhere, either in Canada or the U.S., has found the (agreed statement) specifically was involuntary or the product of coercion,” the lawyers state in their filing last month. “A sworn confession is not lightly ignored, particularly when (Khadr) benefited significantly from it in terms of a plea agreement resulting in a reduced sentence and the eligibility to be commuted back to Canada.”
Nor is it relevant, they argue, how Khadr was treated after American forces captured him as a 15-year-old in Afghanistan in July 2002 and shipped him off to the infamous prison where, Canadian courts have concluded, he was abused and his rights violated.
The lawyers are calling on Alberta’s Court of Queen’s Bench to enforce a US$134-million judgment against Khadr handed down in Utah in June 2015 in favour of Sgt. Chris Speer’s widow, Tabitha Speer, and former U.S. special forces soldier Layne Morris. Chris Speer was killed following a massive U.S. assault on an insurgent compound in which Khadr was badly wounded. Morris was blinded in one eye during the same operation.
In exchange for a further eight-year prison term and the promise he could serve most of it in Canada, the Toronto-born Khadr admitted in 2010 before a widely discredited military commission in Guantanamo Bay to having thrown the grenades that killed Speer and injured Morris.
Khadr later said that his detailed confession — contained in a lengthy agreed statement of facts written by American military prosecutors — and guilty plea to five purported war crimes were his only way to be returned to Canada. He also now says he doesn’t remember what happened during the four-hour Afghanistan assault.
In defending against the enforcement application in Alberta, Khadr maintained he was a child soldier whose rights were violated by both his American captors and Canadian officials. His Edmonton-based lawyer, Nate Whitling, asserted in a statement of defence filed in November that the military commission was a bogus court that prosecuted made-up crimes without regard to Khadr’s age and complaints of torture.
The Supreme Court of Canada, Whitling notes, found that Khadr made self-incriminating statements to American and Canadian officials at Guantanamo while detained under conditions that “offend the most basic Canadian standards about the treatment of detained youth suspects.”
The federal government apologized to Khadr and, in a move still having political repercussions, paid him $10.5 million last summer to settle a civil claim he made against Ottawa. Word of the settlement prompted the American plaintiffs to make an unsuccessful bid to have an Ontario court freeze his assets while they fought to enforce the Utah judgment in Canada.
Given the Supreme Court findings and Ottawa’s apology to Khadr, Whitling maintains that recognizing the Utah award would “offend Canada’s public policy principles.”
In rebuttal, the Americans’ Calgary-based lawyer Dan Gilborn argues Canada, like Utah, has legislation that allows victims of terrorism to sue for damages.
“There can be no breach of Canadian public policy to enforce a judgment obtained in the same way a Canadian can obtain a similar judgment,” says Gilborn, who argues Khadr didn’t qualify as a “child soldier.”
Nor is it the role of a Canadian court to effectively act as an Appeal Court for the American military commission proceedings, Gilborn says.
To avoid running afoul of procedural time limits, Gilborn said the Alberta case might yet be put on hold in favour of a similar application in Ontario. That action, filed last June, has seen little movement beyond an initial flurry of activity. Whitling had no comment on any potential agreement to set the Alberta proceedings aside.
Khadr, 31, who is now married, was released on bail in Alberta in 2015 pending the outcome of his stalled appeal in the U.S. of his military commission conviction.
None of the Americans’ arguments nor Khadr’s defence against them related to the Utah judgment has been tested in a Canadian court.
Omar Khadr can’t avoid civil judgment by recanting war crimes plea: Plaintiff’s lawyers | Toronto Sun
 
Hoid
#207
This guy was a bargain at $10 million.

The Algerian guy who is suing us for $50 million is going to prove that in spades.
 
JamesBondo
#208
spaminator, that article goes back to june 2017, you have effectively invented your own version of necro.
 
copper jacket
#209
Quote: Originally Posted by Angstrom View Post

https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/new...service=mobile

Well that's depressing. Can i please opt out of paying taxes please if it's making me suicidal ?
There has to be somewhere i can apply.

its just not right.
 
gerryh
#210
Quote: Originally Posted by copper jacket View Post

its just not right.

why?
 

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