BC Forest Fires

JLM
#121
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Question: Are deciduous patches of forest that are cut down in BC replaced with deciduous trees, or faster growing fir trees for the forestry industry?


https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/i.../new-page-1462


There's a lot to pick through here which I haven't done. You might find this helpful. I would imagine the rules might vary according to inventory and growing conditions in various areas. Good luck.
 
Jinentonix
#122
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/i.../new-page-1462
There's a lot to pick through here which I haven't done. You might find this helpful. I would imagine the rules might vary according to inventory and growing conditions in various areas. Good luck.

Yeesh, gonna need a month of Sundays to dig through all that to maybe find the answer. But thanks all the same. At least I'm not in a rush for the info, just curious.
 
JLM
#123
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Yeesh, gonna need a month of Sundays to dig through all that to maybe find the answer. But thanks all the same. At least I'm not in a rush for the info, just curious.


Maybe a few Saturdays too!
 
Twin_Moose
+2
#124
I would assume planting evergreen would be the priority due to the slow germination and vulnerability of the sapling versus cloning of deciduous and quick regrowth rate. That's what they do here in the prairies concentrate planting on pines and let poplar replenish naturally.
 
JLM
+1
#125
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

I would assume planting evergreen would be the priority due to the slow germination and vulnerability of the sapling versus cloning of deciduous and quick regrowth rate. That's what they do here in the prairies concentrate planting on pines and let poplar replenish naturally.


I understand some species are better self - seeders than others, but off the top I have no which ones. Commercially I imagine Douglas Fir be a preferred one due to its strength.
 
Curious Cdn
#126
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I understand some species are better self - seeders than others, but off the top I have no which ones. Commercially I imagine Douglas Fir be a preferred one due to its strength.

Sitka spruce .... used to be used for sailboat spars. Flexible is strong.
 
Jinentonix
+1
#127
The main reason I asked is because fir trees tend to be a lot more flammable. They also noticed in one of the forests in Europe where they've been replacing deciduous stands with fir stands that the surrounding temps are higher. Deciduous stands also create natural fire breaks. Yeah, they'll still burn but they take longer to really get going.
 
Mowich
#128
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Question: Are deciduous patches of forest that are cut down in BC replaced with deciduous trees, or faster growing fir trees for the forestry industry?

I could be wrong but I believe it depends on what part of the province it is as there are various and very different ecosystems within our province. What grows in the Okanagan may not do well up here in the Cariboo and vice versa. Though I must admit that that has changed somewhat over the years as I see that Ponderosa Pines are doing well here whereas the Cedar is slowing dieing out.
 
pgs
+1
#129
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Your education is sadly lacking, I actually worked? with a guy who couldn't tell a Douglas Fir from a Red Cedar. He was as useless as a cut cat.

They are both big trees with green stuff growing on them .
 
petros
+1
#130
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I understand some species are better self - seeders than others, but off the top I have no which ones. Commercially I imagine Douglas Fir be a preferred one due to its strength.

White spruce is the commercial tree of choice in the boreal. 25 years from seed to harvest.

Dougie grows too slow, hard to cure and is too dense for anything beyond floor joists and stairs in modern homes.

Boreal lumber is far far cheaper than the mountain stuff to farm and harvest.

You'd be surprised at how any homes in BC are framed and sheeted with SK forest products.
 
petros
#131
Hey Mowich The difference 1 year makes huh?
Will I need to get a couple Riders to do a flood video for you? It must be climate change induced extreme weather.

I spent 6 days in the Rockies last week. Started in Jasper and went all the way down to Good Grief Idaho. 18C was the warmest day and our last. It was snowing a couple hundred metres higher up at The ice fields at 3C at the base. Not typical for the 4th of July. It did warm up to 6.5C from Lake Louise to Radium and and 11C the rest of the way into the US.

Warmest day on the boat at Koocanusa was 18 Shitty cold on the lake so we pretty much spent 5 days below deck drinking wine and eating trout and kokanee.

I don't know why with permanent climate change drought but all the rivers were running high and there is a shitload heading to 3 oceans.
How much do you want to wager all that freshwater is going to send salinity plummeting causing regional current anomalies like how they blame climate change altering the Gulf of Mexico currents when the Mississippi is at above average outflow.

B.C.’s Chilcotin River flood affects about 120 properties: regional district

Around here 4 inches over four days means not watering the lawn and garden for a week, not floods.

By The Canadian Press
Thu., July 11, 2019timer1 min. read
WILLIAMS LAKE, B.C. — The Cariboo Regional District says about 120 properties may have been affected by flooding along the Chilcotin River and its tributaries in British Columbia’s southern Interior.

District officials conducted a flyover of the huge region southwest of Williams Lake on Wednesday in order to determine the extent of flooding that occurred when more than 100 millimetres of rain swamped the area between July 5 and July 9.

Emergency officials say the flooded areas cover hundreds of kilometres, but the hardest hit regions include Big Creek, Nemaiah Valley and the Xeni Gwet’in First Nation.

The say damage to the 120 properties will vary and efforts are underway to determine how long it will take to repair washed out roads and bridges, while 20 ranchers have already reported submerged hay fields and damaged outbuildings.


Emergency Info BC

@EmergencyInfoBC
Flood Warning DOWNGRADED to High Streamflow Advisory for two tributaries of the Chilcotin River. Flood Warning MAINTAINED for Chilcotin River below Big Creek & other tributaries. More info: http://ow.ly/fXGv50uXLnS #BCFlood

11
12:32 PM - Jul 10, 2019
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15 people are talking about this
ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW
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The B.C. River Forecast Centre is maintaining a flood warning along the Chilcotin River southwest of Williams Lake, but its latest post says water levels have peaked at the one-in-200-year flood level.

Most of the river’s tributaries remain at flood stage, although the warning has been reduced to a high streamflow advisory for the Chilko River and Big Creek.

Water levels throughout the river system are forecast to continue receding slowly into the weekend.

Residents stranded by severed roads or bridges will be supported with food and water as required, the regional district says.

It urges affected residents to contact its emergency operations centre to discuss specific assistance.
Last edited by petros; Jul 12th, 2019 at 06:31 AM..
 
pgs
#132
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Hey Mowich The difference 1 year makes huh?
Will I need to get a couple Riders to do a flood video for you? It must be climate change induced extreme weather.

I spent 6 days in the Rockies last week. Started in Jasper and went all the way down to Good Grief Idaho. 18C was the warmest day and our last. It was snowing a couple hundred metres higher up at The ice fields at 3C at the base. Not typical for the 4th of July. It did warm up to 6.5C from Lake Louise to Radium and and 11C the rest of the way into the US.

Warmest day on the boat at Koocanusa was 18 Shitty cold on the lake so we pretty much spent 5 days below deck drinking wine and eating trout and kokanee.

I don't know why with permanent climate change drought but all the rivers were running high and there is a shitload heading to 3 oceans.
How much do you want to wager all that freshwater is going to send salinity plummeting causing regional current anomalies like how they blame climate change altering the Gulf of Mexico currents when the Mississippi is at above average outflow.

B.C.’s Chilcotin River flood affects about 120 properties: regional district

Around here 4 inches over four days means not watering the lawn and garden for a week, not floods.

By The Canadian Press
Thu., July 11, 2019timer1 min. read
WILLIAMS LAKE, B.C. — The Cariboo Regional District says about 120 properties may have been affected by flooding along the Chilcotin River and its tributaries in British Columbia’s southern Interior.

District officials conducted a flyover of the huge region southwest of Williams Lake on Wednesday in order to determine the extent of flooding that occurred when more than 100 millimetres of rain swamped the area between July 5 and July 9.

Emergency officials say the flooded areas cover hundreds of kilometres, but the hardest hit regions include Big Creek, Nemaiah Valley and the Xeni Gwet’in First Nation.

The say damage to the 120 properties will vary and efforts are underway to determine how long it will take to repair washed out roads and bridges, while 20 ranchers have already reported submerged hay fields and damaged outbuildings.


Emergency Info BC

@EmergencyInfoBC
Flood Warning DOWNGRADED to High Streamflow Advisory for two tributaries of the Chilcotin River. Flood Warning MAINTAINED for Chilcotin River below Big Creek & other tributaries. More info: http://ow.ly/fXGv50uXLnS #BCFlood

11
12:32 PM - Jul 10, 2019
Twitter Ads info and privacy
15 people are talking about this
ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW
SPONSORED

The B.C. River Forecast Centre is maintaining a flood warning along the Chilcotin River southwest of Williams Lake, but its latest post says water levels have peaked at the one-in-200-year flood level.

Most of the river’s tributaries remain at flood stage, although the warning has been reduced to a high streamflow advisory for the Chilko River and Big Creek.

Water levels throughout the river system are forecast to continue receding slowly into the weekend.

Residents stranded by severed roads or bridges will be supported with food and water as required, the regional district says.

It urges affected residents to contact its emergency operations centre to discuss specific assistance.

Funny eh , just last month the CBC had a scientific sounding article saying B.C. was in drought and dryer then ever been recorded .
 
Johnnny
#133
They will replace an area with pines, firs, spruces etc. The reason why you see poplar/cottonwood everywhere is because it grows fast and the companies will seed it sometimes to retain the soil.
 
Johnnny
#134
In Sudbury for example they used birch because birch loves the acidic soil man. So bro after that shit tripped out for a generation, all the other trees had a bit of a base to form their base which allowed for a sorta slight comeback.
 
Curious Cdn
#135
Quote: Originally Posted by Johnnny View Post

In Sudbury for example they used birch because birch loves the acidic soil man. So bro after that shit tripped out for a generation, all the other trees had a bit of a base to form their base which allowed for a sorta slight comeback.

I thought it was because you guys like to whip each other with birch switches in those famous Sudbury gay bath houses.
 
JLM
#136
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I thought it was because you guys like to whip each other with birch switches in those famous Sudbury gay bath houses.



You say you are familiar with what goes on in those Sudbury gay bath houses?
 
Danbones
#137
All those sausage cameras have to output somewhere.




Nutritional content reports don't just right themselves and then leave themselves carelessly left lying around...

like Pinocchio's nose.
 
Curious Cdn
#138
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

You say you are familiar with what goes on in those Sudbury gay bath houses?

Aren't you?
 
JLM
#139
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Aren't you?


I drove through Sudbury 52 years ago, but don't recall stopping at any bath houses!
 
Danbones
#140
They just hang an "OUT' sign on the "In" door to confuse the tourists.

Why the heck do you think they put a half a nekkid butt cheek symbol ( usually black ) on the door?
Last edited by Danbones; Jul 13th, 2019 at 06:43 AM..
 
Johnnny
#141
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I thought it was because you guys like to whip each other with birch switches in those famous Sudbury gay bath houses.

The old suomalainen prefer to use alder
 
Mowich
+2
#142
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Hey Mowich The difference 1 year makes huh?
Will I need to get a couple Riders to do a flood video for you? It must be climate change induced extreme weather.

It's been a wonderful summer so far, Pete. June was very wet and we've had rain every single day or night for over two weeks now with some breaks for a bit of sun. Early forecasts for a blistering hot July have come to naught - thank goodness. The creek and lake levels are way up for this time of year. No flooding around here like they are experiencing in the Chilcotin so we are lucky that way too. No one around here is complaining too much about the weather considering what we've been through the past couple of years.
 
JLM
+1
#143
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

It's been a wonderful summer so far, Pete. June was very wet and we've had rain every single day or night for over two weeks now with some breaks for a bit of sun. Early forecasts for a blistering hot July have come to naught - thank goodness. The creek and lake levels are way up for this time of year. No flooding around here like they are experiencing in the Chilcotin so we are lucky that way too. No one around here is complaining too much about the weather considering what we've been through the past couple of years.


Nothing at all to really complain about either, Mowich. Everything is green now, fire danger is low and most days are pleasant and warm (not sweltering) garden is thriving. I recall hearing a lot one year ago about the "NEW NORMAL", figured it was b.s. then and know it was b.s. now. There's been anomalies in weather forever but Mother Nature balances the "ledger" periodically.
 
Curious Cdn
#144
Quote: Originally Posted by Johnnny View Post

The old suomalainen prefer to use alder

Yumpin' Yiminy!
 
petros
+2
#145
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

It's been a wonderful summer so far, Pete. June was very wet and we've had rain every single day or night for over two weeks now with some breaks for a bit of sun. Early forecasts for a blistering hot July have come to naught - thank goodness. The creek and lake levels are way up for this time of year. No flooding around here like they are experiencing in the Chilcotin so we are lucky that way too. No one around here is complaining too much about the weather considering what we've been through the past couple of years.

If you are safe and happy, I'm happy.

It may have been a cold, shitty spring and early summer but boy is it ever lush.

I've gone from worries of another dry short year to fearing hail, blow down and another early frost/snow.

Oh well, life would be boring without risk.

Stay safe dear.
 
Mowich
+2
#146
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

If you are safe and happy, I'm happy.

It may have been a cold, shitty spring and early summer but boy is it ever lush.

I've gone from worries of another dry short year to fearing hail, blow down and another early frost/snow.

Oh well, life would be boring without risk.

Stay safe dear.


Every chance I got early this spring when the weather was mentioned, I'd say 'I hope the rain starts in June and continues through until say.......September'. I do believe the Universe heard me because so far, that's what we've got. And speaking of lush the wild hay in the ditches is over six feet tall. Everything is growing like mad around here. The airy is so balmy it's almost coastal without the salt tang.

My sister in Craven has been keeping me up-to-date on Sask weather. Her latest report was about Tim McGraw being cancelled due to thunder storms. We've had some fierce though thankfully short-lived hail storms here. The last one really got my attention as the stones were larger than I'd seen before - a little bit bigger and rougher than an agate. The weather has taken a toll on shallow-rooted Spruce too. They are coming down all over the place. My neighbor down the road a piece, had a 2-foot diameter one fall over his fence and all the way across the road.

We could do with some sun if for no other reason than finally getting my lawn mowed. I hope some comes your way Pete.

Life is good. Thank you so much for your kind wishes and back at ya.
 
MHz
+1
#147
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Life is good. Thank you so much for your kind wishes and back at ya.

So you are both capable of showing love but only of you are part of the same collective. You looking for a medal?

M't:5:43-47:
Ye have heard that it hath been said,
Thou shalt love thy neighbour,
and hate thine enemy.
But I say unto you,
Love your enemies,
bless them that curse you,
do good to them that hate you,
and pray for them which despitefully use you,
and persecute you;
That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven:
for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good,
and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.
For if ye love them which love you,
what reward have ye?
do not even the publicans the same?
And if ye salute your brethren only,

what do ye more than others?
do not even the publicans so?
 
JLM
+2
#148
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

If you are safe and happy, I'm happy.

It may have been a cold, shitty spring and early summer but boy is it ever lush.

I've gone from worries of another dry short year to fearing hail, blow down and another early frost/snow.

Oh well, life would be boring without risk.

Stay safe dear.


Kind of blows the drama queens' theories we heard most of last summer about the "new normal", huh?
 
petros
+1
#149
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Every chance I got early this spring when the weather was mentioned, I'd say 'I hope the rain starts in June and continues through until say.......September'. I do believe the Universe heard me because so far, that's what we've got. And speaking of lush the wild hay in the ditches is over six feet tall. Everything is growing like mad around here. The airy is so balmy it's almost coastal without the salt tang.
My sister in Craven has been keeping me up-to-date on Sask weather. Her latest report was about Tim McGraw being cancelled due to thunder storms. We've had some fierce though thankfully short-lived hail storms here. The last one really got my attention as the stones were larger than I'd seen before - a little bit bigger and rougher than an agate. The weather has taken a toll on shallow-rooted Spruce too. They are coming down all over the place. My neighbor down the road a piece, had a 2-foot diameter one fall over his fence and all the way across the road.
We could do with some sun if for no other reason than finally getting my lawn mowed. I hope some comes your way Pete.
Life is good. Thank you so much for your kind wishes and back at ya.

It's nice to have a lawn again. I mowed 3 times in the past 2 years. This year, twice a week.

Our garden sucks tho.
 
petros
#150
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Kind of blows the drama queens' theories we heard most of last summer about the "new normal", huh?

Is that from the Politburo in Viktorya or a reliable source?
 

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