Drilling in the Wildlife's Refuge


Chewy
#1
A counter part of mine in the US posted this last month, He is from Texas and feels very strongly that the US needs to drill in the A.N.W.R this is the plan.

Quote:

Not according to the professor I had earlier this summer who grew up in Baghdad and lived in South America because his dad was a petroleum engineer.

The class was one of my many computer courses but somehow oil came up. He had a weird accent but I never knew why. Apparently hes been moved around the world quite a lot as a child.

Anyway, he said that we could have zero impact by towing ice blocks to Alaska and sliding them up on the land to the site. They would then bring in the buildings on barges and place them on top of the ice blocks. The ice doesnt melt, so they have a foundation that doesnt harm the environment and will just be melted or crushed when the oil runs out eventually leaving no impact.

They would then use bent pipe drilling to reach all over the area with only one hole (or a couple, but one location). He said they could drill from oil thats like 80 miles away. Maybe it was 8 miles... there was an 8. It was 8 or 80. In any case, that is impressive and seriously reduces impact on the environment.

As far as the caribou, we already have pipelines in Alaska. The caribou that travel through those areas are the largest herds in Alaska because the warmth of the pipes protects the caribou as they migrate. Apparently oil pipelines transport oil at about 130 F which makes a wonderful "winter blanket" for caribou.

 
vista
#2
In 1998 a geological survey was done by the United States Geological Service, which found that there were between 4.3 11.8 billion barrels of technically available oil and gas.

To put that into context, the planet consumes 1 billion barrels every 12 days.

Drilling this oil will bide some time providing the U.S. recognizes the need for conservation and to look beyond fossil fuels. All this needs to be done on the scale of a Manhattan Project at lightning speed.

Otherwise drilling here won't solve much - the issue of a society built on a finite fuel source.

Author David Goodstein (Out of Gas: The End of the Age of Oil) feels drilling here would be a crime.

"The best reason for not drilling there is not to protect the wildlife. It is to preserve the oil for future generations to use in petrochemicals, rather than burning it up in our cars."
 
vista
#3
Chewy,

I am going through my files and cleaning up a few things.

Here is an article on the ANWR that is still active and maybe of interest.

Study: ANWR oil would have little impact

Heavy reliance on foreign imports would continue, agency finds

http://msnbc.msn.com/id/4542853/
 
darkbeaver
+1
#4  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by vista View Post

In 1998 a geological survey was done by the United States Geological Service, which found that there were between 4.3 11.8 billion barrels of technically available oil and gas.

To put that into context, the planet consumes 1 billion barrels every 12 days.

Drilling this oil will bide some time providing the U.S. recognizes the need for conservation and to look beyond fossil fuels. All this needs to be done on the scale of a Manhattan Project at lightning speed.

Otherwise drilling here won't solve much - the issue of a society built on a finite fuel source.

Author David Goodstein (Out of Gas: The End of the Age of Oil) feels drilling here would be a crime.

"The best reason for not drilling there is not to protect the wildlife. It is to preserve the oil for future generations to use in petrochemicals, rather than burning it up in our cars."






Yer term finite fuel source is retarded nonscense frum

new age twits, hydrocarbon production on earth never stops. What do you think your contribution after life will result in? When did the hydro carbon cycle stop?
 
darkbeaver
+1
#5
The wildlife is not the entire source of hydro carbon deposites on this planet, these compounds are regularly bulk produced by electrical discharge, the great configurater of matter.
 
darkbeaver
+1
#6
Wildlife's Refuge,




There is no such thing, no refuge from nature exist in nature.
Last edited by darkbeaver; Mar 26th, 2019 at 08:19 PM..
 
MHz
#7
'Reserve' is the proper term, critters rather than people, it basically means 'ours, hands off, we will destroy it at the time of out choosing'.
 
darkbeaver
+1
#8
The idea that mankind can destroy nature is preposterous, even the Sun has failed numerous times, just have a look in the geological layers, near extinction events are as common as fossils.
 

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