Scientists unveil first image ever made of black hole


spaminator
+1
#1
Scientists unveil first image ever made of black hole
Associated Press
Published:
April 10, 2019
Updated:
April 10, 2019 1:20 PM EDT
WASHINGTON — Scientists on Wednesday revealed the first image ever made of a black hole, depicting a fiery ring of gravity-twisted light swirling around the edge of the abyss.
The picture, assembled from data gathered by eight radio telescopes around the world, shows the hot, shadowy lip of a supermassive black hole, one of the light-sucking monsters of the universe theorized by Einstein more than a century ago and confirmed by observations for decades. It is along this edge that light bends around itself in a cosmic funhouse effect.
“We have seen what we thought was unseeable. We have seen and taken a picture of a black hole,” Sheperd Doeleman of Harvard, leader of a team of about 200 scientists from 20 countries, announced as the colourized orange-and-black picture was unveiled.
University of Waterloo physicist Avery Broderick, a co-discoverer, declared: “Science fiction has become science fact.”
University of Waterloo Associate Professor Avery Broderick attends a news conference to reveal the first photograph of a black hole at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images
In fact, Jessica Dempsey, a co-discoverer and deputy director of the East Asian Observatory in Hawaii, said the fiery circle reminded her of the flaming Eye of Sauron from the Lord of the Rings trilogy.
Unlike smaller black holes that come from collapsed stars, supermassive black holes are mysterious in origin. Situated at the centre of most galaxies, including ours, they are so dense that nothing, not even light, can escape their gravitational pull. This one’s “event horizon” — the precipice, or point of no return, where light and matter begin to fall inexorably into the hole — is as big as our entire solar system.
Three years ago, scientists using an extraordinarily sensitive observing system heard the sound of two much smaller black holes merging to create a gravitational wave, as Albert Einstein predicted. The new image, published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and announced around the world, adds light to that sound.
Outside scientists suggested the achievement could be worthy of a Nobel Prize, just like the gravitational wave discovery.
“I think it looks very convincing,” said Andrea Ghez, director of the UCLA Galactic Center Group, who wasn’t part of the discovery team.
This image released Wednesday, April 10, 2019, by Event Horizon Telescope shows a black hole. Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration / Maunakea Observatories via AP
The image helps confirm Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Einstein a century ago even predicted the symmetrical shape that scientists just found.
The picture was made with equipment that detects wavelengths that can’t be seen by the human eye, so astronomers added colour to convey the ferocious heat of the gas and dust, glowing at a temperature of perhaps millions of degrees. But if a person were to somehow get close to this black hole, it might not look quite like that, astronomers said.
The black hole is about 6 billion times the mass of our sun and is in a galaxy called M87 that is about 53 million light-years from Earth. One light-year is 5.9 trillion miles, or 9.5 trillion kilometres.
Black holes are the “most extreme environment in the known universe,” Broderick said, a violent, churning place of “gravity run amok.”
While much of the matter around a black hole gets sucked into the vortex, never to be seen again, the new picture captures gas and dust that are lucky to be circling just far enough to be safe and to be seen millions of years later on Earth.
A black hole’s gravity creates a funhouse effect where you can see light from both behind the black hole and behind you as the light curves and circles around the black hole.
Despite decades of study, there are a few people who deny black holes exist, and this work shows that they do, said Boston University astronomer professor Alan Marscher, a co-discoverer.
The project cost US$50 million to $60 million, with $28 million of that coming from the National Science Foundation. The same team has gathered even more data on a black hole in the centre of our galaxy, but scientists said the object is so jumpy they don’t have a good picture yet.
Myth says a black hole would rip you apart, but scientists said that because of the particular forces exerted by an object as big as the one they documented, someone could fall into it and not be torn to pieces. But the person would never be heard from or seen again.
Black holes are “like the walls of a prison. Once you cross it, you will never be able to get out and you will never be able to communicate,” said astronomer Avi Loeb, who is director of the Black Hole Initiative at Harvard but was not involved in the discovery.
The telescope data was gathered two years ago, over four days when the weather had to be just right all around the world. Completing the image was an enormous undertaking, involving an international team of scientists, supercomputers and hundreds of terabytes of data.
When scientists initially put all that data into the first picture, what they saw looked so much like what they expected they didn’t believe it at first.
“We’ve been hunting this for a long time,” Dempsey said. “We’ve been getting closer and closer with better technology.”

http://youtube.com/watch?v=dHD0XQMO06c
http://youtube.com/watch?v=DkPLJKKMRzg
http://torontosun.com/technology/bla...-bending-abyss
looks like a solar eclipse
 
spaminator
+2
#2  Top Rated Post
 
petros
#3
Describe a hole without describing it's surroundings. ��
 
Walter
#4
Cool science but not important to most everyone.
 
MHz
#5
The newest ones show plasma jets apparently.
 
MHz
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Describe a hole without describing it's surroundings. ��

Your life in the collective.
 
spaminator
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Cool science but not important to most everyone.

you wont be saying that when one comes to get you.
 
spaminator
#8
Picture was clear, but black hole’s name a little fuzzy
Associated Press
Published:
April 12, 2019
Updated:
April 12, 2019 10:32 PM EDT
This false-colour image released Wednesday, April 10, 2019 by the Event Horizon Telescope shows a black hole at the center of the Messier 87 galaxy. (Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration/Maunakea Observatories via AP)
WASHINGTON — The newly pictured supermassive black hole is a beast with no name, at least not an official one. And what happens next could be cosmically confusing.
The team of astronomers who created the image of the black hole called it M87(asterisk). (The asterisk is silent.) A language professor has given it a name from a Hawaiian chant — Powehi — meaning “the adorned fathomless dark creation.” And the international group in charge of handing out astronomical names? It has never named a black hole.
The black hole in question is about 53 million light years away in the centre of a galaxy called Messier 87, or M87 for short. On Wednesday, scientists revealed a picture they took of it using eight radio telescopes, the first time humans had actually seen one of the dense celestial objects that suck up everything around them, even light.
The International Astronomical Union usually takes care of names, but only for stuff inside our solar system and stars outside it. It doesn’t have a committee set up to handle other objects, like black holes, galaxies or nebulas.
The last time there was a similar situation, poor Pluto somehow got demoted to a dwarf planet, leading to public outcry, said Williams College astronomer Jay Pasachoff, a star-naming committee member.
Story continues below
Technically, our own galaxy — the Milky Way — has never been officially named by the IAU, said Rick Fienberg, an astronomer and press officer for the American Astronomical Society. He said, “that’s just a term that came down through history.”
“Virtually every object in the sky has more than one designation,” Fienberg said. “The constellations have their official IAU sanctioned names but in other cultures, they have other names.”
THE GIFT OF A NAME
When it comes to the black hole we saw this week , University of Hawaii-Hilo Hawaiian professor Larry Kimura stepped up even before the photo was unveiled.
Powehi (pronounced poh-veh-hee) is the black hole’s Hawaiian name, not its official name, explained Jessica Dempsey, who helped capture the black hole image as deputy director of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii’s tallest mountain. Hawaii Gov. David Ige proclaimed April 10 as Powehi day, she said.
“This isn’t astronomers naming this,” she said. “This is coming from a cultural expert and language expert. This is him coming to the table and giving us a gift of this name. It’s a gift from Hawaiian culture and history, not the other way around.”
When asked about Kimura’s idea, IAU naming committee member Pasachoff said: “That’s the first I heard of it.”
Eric Mamajek, chairman of the IAU working group on star names, called it a “wonderful, thoughtful name.”
Centre of the Milky Way is teeming with black holes
Super big black hole from early universe farthest ever found
THE PLUTO SITUATION
But Mamajek said his committee may not be the right one to grant the black hole a name. It only does stars.
“This is exactly the Pluto situation,” Pasachoff said.
In 2006, astronomers at the IAU were discussing naming a large object in our solar system that eventually got called Eris. It wasn’t considered a planet, so it wasn’t the job of the planet committee. But some experts pointed out that it was bigger than Pluto, which added some confusion.
The conference decided to reclassify planets, kicked Pluto out of the club of regular planets and made it join the newly established dwarf planets category with Eris, Pasachoff said.
MORE NAMES COMING
The same day the photograph of the black hole was unveiled, the IAU asked the public to choose between three names for an object astronomers call 2007 OR10. It’s an icy planetesimal that circles the sun but gets 100 times further from our star than Earth does.
The three proposed names are Gonggong, a Chinese water god with red hair and a serpent tail; Holle, a European winter goddess of fertility; and Vili, a Nordic deity and brother of Odin.
The IAU is trying to bring in more languages and cultures into the naming game, Pasachoff and Fienberg said. And soon the IAU will ask the public to help name 100 planets outside our solar system.
As astronomers gaze further into the cosmos, Pasachoff said, “we will need more names.”

http://youtube.com/watch?v=O41q6hjO-io
http://torontosun.com/news/world/pic...a-little-fuzzy
 
Blackleaf
+1
#9
It's not a black hole. It's an XBox 360's Red Ring of Death.

 
Curious Cdn
+2
#10
It's not a black hole. It's Theresa May's future political career.
 
Hoid
#11
It took the equivalent of a half tonne of hard drives to hold the data it took to create the image.
 
Walter
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

It's not a black hole. It's Theresa May's future political career.

Here’s hoping.
 
Danbones
+1
#13
Physicist Claims to Have Proven Mathematically That Black Holes Do Not Exist

Mersini-Houghton claims that she has clearly and effectively reconciled Einstein’s Theory of Relativity with quantum mechanics. Though the two have never necessarily been at odds on a large scale, physicists have previously been unable to merge the two cohesively. In terms of relativity, the formation of the black hole can be predicted.

However, in quantum mechanics, the uncertainty principle doesn’t really permit one to know exactly where something is located. It’s possible to get pretty close, but not exactly. This is just one of many ways in which quantum theory and Einstein’s classical field theory fail to align when it comes to black holes.

“Physicists have been trying to merge these two theories – Einstein’s theory of gravity and quantum mechanics – for decades, but this scenario brings these two theories together, into harmony,” Mersini-Houghton stated in a press release. “And that’s a big deal.”

However, not everyone is on board with Mersini-Houghton’s conclusions. William Unruh, a theoretical physicist from the University of British Columbia, pointed out some fatal flaws in the paper's argument.

https://www.iflscience.com/physics/p...-do-not-exist/
Last edited by Danbones; Apr 14th, 2019 at 06:19 AM..
 
Blackleaf
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

It's not a black hole. It's Theresa May's future political career.

I'd say it's also Brexit. Brexit is a black hole that the Remainers and the EU can't ever hope to escape from.

Brexit delayed until Halloween at the latest:

 
darkbeaver
#15
Wal Thornhill: Black Hole or Plasmoid? | Space News

In this interview recorded on April 8, 2019, physicist Wal Thornhill discusses why the recent so-called "first picture of a black hole" actually affirms the plasma cosmology hypothesis that the object at a galactic core is not a black hole at all but an ultra-high density energy storage phenomena called ...
 
darkbeaver
#16
None of these claims can be substantiated. A mathematical computer model is not real evidence for those claims. It isn’t science. The image of Einstein, the embodiment of genius, in front of a blackboard where he had just scrawled Rik = 0 says it all. As Steve Crothers has noted, that simple expression says there is no matter outside the black hole. By its own definition a black hole exists in an empty universe — no partner to orbit it and no observer to witness it. The principle of superposition (that is multiple bodies) in a flat Newtonian universe does not apply in the asymptotically flat space of the fictitious black hole universe.http://www.holoscience.com/wp/eu-views/


ENSTEIN'S 'FIELD EQUATIONS' SIMPLIFIED (especially for the non-mathematical reader)
I shall now elaborate on the above proof, without any complicated mathematics.
All other types of alleged black hole rely on the 'Schwarzschild' black hole because they all subsume it, and are therefore also invalid.
First and foremost, Einstein's field equations,
"couple the gravitational field (contained in the curvature of spacetime) with its sources." (Foster and Nightingale 1995)
This means that there is a causal connexion between the material sources of Einstein's gravitational field and his spacetime curvature (spacetime geometry). Let's take a quick look at Einstein’s field equations without the so-called 'Cosmological Constant', thus,
Gμν = -κTμν This is an intimidating and uninformative expression. We shall therefore reduce it to simple words, thus,
Einstein tensor = -κ(energy-momentum tensor) So the Gμν thing on the left side of Einstein's field equations is called the Einstein tensor and the Tμν thing on the right side is called the energy-momentum tensor. The symbol κ is just a coupling constant. This identifies the parts of Einstein's field equations, but doesn't convey any meaning, so we will write them more informatively as,
spacetime geometry = -κ(material sources) According to Einstein if there are no material sources present (material sources = 0) his field equations reduce to,
Ric = Rμν = 0 So the Rμν thing on the left side of this set of equations is called the Ricci tensor (Ric for short). This identifies the parts of Einstein's field equations but doesn't convey any meaning, so we will write them more informatively as,
spacetime geometry = 0 There are no material sources present in this expression. Einstein (1916) said that this expression describes "the field equations of gravitation in the absence of matter". That's true, because material sources = 0 by mathematical construction. Ric = 0 contains no matter. Einstein first mathematically removes all material sources from his field equations by setting material sources = 0 (i.e. energy-momentum tensor = 0), and then, in his very next breath, linguistically reinstates the presence of a material source by saying that spacetime geometry = 0 describes his gravitational field "outside" a body such as a star. Let's see what Einstein said about Hilbert's solution for Ric = 0:
"M denotes the sun's mass, centrally symmetrically placed about the origin of co-ordinates; the solution (109a) is valid only outside of this mass, where all the Tμν vanish.” (Einstein 1967)
Einstein's argument for Ric = 0 is contradictory and therefore invalid.
We can easily reaffirmhttp://www.holoscience.com/wp/eu-views/
Last edited by darkbeaver; Apr 21st, 2019 at 12:27 PM..
 
MHz
#17

'Black Hole' vs 'milk drop at high speed'
 
Blackleaf
#18
If Earth was the size of a carbon atom, our galaxy - the Milky Way - would be 10kms across.

The nearest galaxy to ours, Andromeda, would be 252kms away.

The entire observable universe would be six-and-half times bigger than the Sun is.
 
Blackleaf
#19
But if you think the observable universe is big, remember that it's only the part of the universe that we can see. In reality, the universe could be much, MUCH, larger.

In fact, some scientists estimate the entire universe could be around 150 sextillion times the size of the observable universe.

Scaled down, that would be like thinking the universe is the size of a lightbulb when it's actually the size of Pluto.
Last edited by Blackleaf; Apr 22nd, 2019 at 01:02 PM..
 
Curious Cdn
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

But if you think the observable universe is big, remember that it's only the part of the universe that we can see. In reality, the universe could be much, MUCH, larger.
In fact, some scientists estimate the entire universe could be around 150 sextillion times the size of the observable universe.
Scaled down, that would be like thinking the universe is the size of a lightbulb when it's actually the size of Pluto.

You're the dolt that thinks the sun is "white" and you're lecturing us on endlessness?

"All the science that you can learn from the Daily Mail..."
 
Blackleaf
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

You're the dolt that thinks the sun is "white"..."[/I]

That's because it is.
 
Curious Cdn
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

That's because it is.

Only if you dumb down a lot ...
 
Blackleaf
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Only if you dumb down a lot ...

Instead of attacking what I say - which is a scientific fact - why don't you Google it?

Go on. I dare you.
 
Curious Cdn
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Instead of attacking what I say - which is a scientific fact - why don't you Google it?
Go on. I dare you.

White is a flat line. This is not flat.


http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:...unlight_en.svg
 
Curious Cdn
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Instead of attacking what I say - which is a scientific fact - why don't you Google it?
Go on. I dare you.

http://www.quora.com/What-is-the-emi...to-other-stars
 
Blackleaf
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

White is a flat line. This is not flat.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:...unlight_en.svg

Google it.

 
Curious Cdn
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Instead of attacking what I say - which is a scientific fact - why don't you Google it?
Go on. I dare you.

http://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg...d943d1420ff222
 
Blackleaf
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

http://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg...d943d1420ff222

The Sun and stars with similar temperatures are yellow when observed from the Earth, and that is why they are often represented with this colour on charts like yours and called “yellow dwarfs”.

In reality, however, the Sun is white.
 
Curious Cdn
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The Sun and stars with similar temperatures are yellow when observed from the Earth, and that is why they are often represented with this colour on charts like yours and called “yellow dwarfs”.
In reality, however, the Sun is white.

They're yellow because they are emitting yellow and that's what the emissions spectrum of hydrogen looks like.
 
Blackleaf
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

They're yellow because they are emitting yellow and that's what the emissions spectrum of hydrogen looks like.

I'll repeat again: The Sun only appears yellow - or sometimes orange or red - through Earth's atmosphere.

Its true colour is white.