‘Fundamentally unstable’: Scientists confirm fears on E. Antarctica’s biggest glacier


mentalfloss
#1
‘Fundamentally unstable’: Scientists confirm fears on E. Antarctica’s biggest glacier

The Totten Glacier holds back more ice than any other in East Antarctica, which is itself the biggest ice mass in the world by far. Totten, which lies due south of Western Australia, currently reaches the ocean in the form of a floating shelf of ice that’s 90 miles by 22 miles in area. But the entire region, or what scientists call a “catchment,” that could someday flow into the sea in this area is over 200,000 square miles in size — bigger than California.

Moreover, in some areas that ice is close to 2.5 miles thick, with over a mile of that vertical extent reaching below the surface of the ocean. It’s the very definition of vast.

Warmer waters in this area could, therefore, ultimately be even more damaging than what’s happening in West Antarctica — and the total amount of ice that could someday be lost would raise sea levels by as much as 13 feet.

“This is not the first part of East Antarctica that’s likely to show a multi-meter response to climate change,” said Alan Aitken, the new study’s lead author and a researcher with the University of Western Australia in Perth. “But it might be the biggest in the end, because it’s continually unstable as you go towards the interior of the continent.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...ggest-glacier/
 
captain morgan
+2
#2  Top Rated Post
I blame fraking in Western Canada
 
mentalfloss
#3
Me too.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#4
I blame Stevie Minion.
 
mentalfloss
#5
It was the beaver grin.
 
captain morgan
+2
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

I blame Stevie Minion.

Steve-O does a lot of fraking in his off time... Finds it quite relaxing I hear
 
Blackleaf
#7
A new island has appeared in the Irish Sea just off Fleetwood, Lancashire. How has it done that if sea levels are supposed to be rising?
 
mentalfloss
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Steve-O does a lot of fraking in his off time... Finds it quite relaxing I hear

That wouldn't surprise me.

He has a natural helmet for it.
 
EagleSmack
+1
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

A new island has appeared in the Irish Sea just off Fleetwood, Lancashire. How has it done that if sea levels are supposed to be rising?

That's climate change as well... along with everything else.
 
captain morgan
+2
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

A new island has appeared in the Irish Sea just off Fleetwood, Lancashire. How has it done that if sea levels are supposed to be rising?


This is a direct consequence of the ice free North pole since 2013
 
Blackleaf
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

That's climate change as well... along with everything else.

Just like that unseasonal snow parts of Britain experienced about a fortnight ago.
 
captain morgan
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

That wouldn't surprise me.

He has a natural helmet for it.

maybe Trudeau should think about taking up fraking.... Might be effective in diverting his energies into that as opposed to battering women in Parliament
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Steve-O does a lot of fraking in his off time... Finds it quite relaxing I hear

In between sessions of seal-cub whacking.
 
captain morgan
+1
#14
It's a fantastic workout... Lots of cardio benefit as well
 
Tecumsehsbones
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

It's a fantastic workout... Lots of cardio benefit as well

Well, to be fair, so is marching and waving signs.

Nice that we're all getting so fit!
 
MHz
#16
To heat up the Greenland and the Antarctic from below the rifts must be expanding, since all 40,000 miles of them are on the deeper parts of the ocean each foot they expand the ocean can hold that much water without recording any rise on ocean levels.
One other part not taken into account is the floating ice would warm up and melt and that extra 1 1/2 miles of ice is dumped into the water and should new ice come from the land it will also melt. If the amount of heat released by the rift is enough it could melt all the ice or at come point the new ice will cool the water off enough that the outflow of ice stops.

Warmer water should also allow for bigger snowstorms as more moisture is in the air so as the ice is melting new ice is also being formed at the higher elevations.
 
Blackleaf
#17
Greenland joined what is now the EU on 1st January 1973 as part of Denmark, along with the UK, Gibraltar (as part of the UK), and Rep of Ireland.

In 1985 the Greenlanders held an EU in/out referendum and voted 53% in favour of leaving. And so it left. As far as I know Greenland is still there and has not become victim to some of the unspeakable terrors that roam the vast, untamed wilderness of heathen barbarians outside the EU's civilising, protecting borders.

That's something that voters - including those in Gibraltar where the EU in/out referendum is also being held - need to bear in mind before 23rd June.
Last edited by Blackleaf; May 19th, 2016 at 11:40 AM..
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#18
There you go flossy. Perhaps the ice field should hold a referendum on whether it leaves Antarctica. Problem solved.
 
Blackleaf
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

There you go flossy. Perhaps the ice field should hold a referendum on whether it leaves Antarctica. Problem solved.

Better off out.
 
MHz
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

. . . has not because victim to some of the unspeakable terrors that roam the vast, untamed wilderness of heathen barbarians outside the EU's civilising, protecting borders.

Note to self: add Greenland as possible travel destination.
 
Blackleaf
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Note to self: add Greenland as possible travel destination.

I've often fancied going there. I fancy visiting cold, snowy places with 24 hours a day darkness in winter and where the people throw away whale bones in the same way we throw away chicken bones and they speak some alien, unintelligible language (in this case Greenlandic).
 
pgs
#22
A lot of could's in that article but not many postitives .
 
Walter
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

‘Fundamentally unstable’: Scientists confirm fears on E. Antarctica’s biggest glacier

Oh, no!
 
Blackleaf
#24
What gets me is the guy doing the voiceover as Karl Pilkington's "An Idiot Abroad 2" comes on and he's saying some of the fun things to do before you die. One of them is "See the glaciers before they melt." And it always makes me think something like "Come on, mate, the glaciers aren't melting. They'll still be here, fine and dandy, centuries from now. They are not going to disappear during Karl Pilkington's lifetime. There's nothing wrong with the glaciers. We shouldn't be rushing out to see them before they all disappear."
 
Cliffy
-1
#25
Earth's Relentless Warming Just Hit a Terrible New Threshold

The number of climate records broken in the last few years is stunning. But here's a new measure of misery: Not only did we just experience the hottest April in 137 years of record keeping, but it was the 12th consecutive month to set a new record.
It's been relentless. May 2015 was the hottest May in records dating back to 1880. That was followed by the hottest June. Then came a record July, August, September, October, November, December, January, February, March—and, we learned from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Wednesday—the hottest April. In an age of rising temperatures, monthly heat records have become all too common. Still, a string of 12 of them is without precedent.
Perhaps even more remarkable is the magnitude of the new records. The extremes of recent months are such that we're only four months into 2016 and already there's a greater than 99 percent likelihood that this year will be the hottest on record, according to Gavin Schmidt, who directs NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies.



Earth's Relentless Warming Just Hit a Terrible New Threshold - Bloomberg


Climate Change - Bloomberg QuickTake
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#26
Its been plenty cool over in these parts.
 
Walter
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Earth's Relentless Warming Just Hit a Terrible New Threshold

The number of climate records broken in the last few years is stunning. But here's a new measure of misery: Not only did we just experience the hottest April in 137 years of record keeping, but it was the 12th consecutive month to set a new record.
It's been relentless. May 2015 was the hottest May in records dating back to 1880. That was followed by the hottest June. Then came a record July, August, September, October, November, December, January, February, March—and, we learned from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Wednesday—the hottest April. In an age of rising temperatures, monthly heat records have become all too common. Still, a string of 12 of them is without precedent.
Perhaps even more remarkable is the magnitude of the new records. The extremes of recent months are such that we're only four months into 2016 and already there's a greater than 99 percent likelihood that this year will be the hottest on record, according to Gavin Schmidt, who directs NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies.



Earth's Relentless Warming Just Hit a Terrible New Threshold - Bloomberg


Climate Change - Bloomberg QuickTake

Piffle.
 
darkbeaver
+2
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

‘Fundamentally unstable’: Scientists confirm fears on E. Antarctica’s biggest glacier

The Totten Glacier holds back more ice than any other in East Antarctica, which is itself the biggest ice mass in the world by far. Totten, which lies due south of Western Australia, currently reaches the ocean in the form of a floating shelf of ice that’s 90 miles by 22 miles in area. But the entire region, or what scientists call a “catchment,” that could someday flow into the sea in this area is over 200,000 square miles in size — bigger than California.

Moreover, in some areas that ice is close to 2.5 miles thick, with over a mile of that vertical extent reaching below the surface of the ocean. It’s the very definition of vast.

Warmer waters in this area could, therefore, ultimately be even more damaging than what’s happening in West Antarctica — and the total amount of ice that could someday be lost would raise sea levels by as much as 13 feet.

“This is not the first part of East Antarctica that’s likely to show a multi-meter response to climate change,” said Alan Aitken, the new study’s lead author and a researcher with the University of Western Australia in Perth. “But it might be the biggest in the end, because it’s continually unstable as you go towards the interior of the continent.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...ggest-glacier/

Glaciers break off at the sea end because of upstream accumulations of ice. What in fukk do you think pushes rivers into the sea. They flow to the sea, it's called glacial evolution. I will mail you a clue next tuesday.
 
Cliffy
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Piffle.

I realize facts are not your strong suit Wally. But facts is facts and your not believing in them doesn't change a thing.
 
darkbeaver
+1
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Earth's Relentless Warming Just Hit a Terrible New Threshold

The number of climate records broken in the last few years is stunning. But here's a new measure of misery: Not only did we just experience the hottest April in 137 years of record keeping, but it was the 12th consecutive month to set a new record.
It's been relentless. May 2015 was the hottest May in records dating back to 1880. That was followed by the hottest June. Then came a record July, August, September, October, November, December, January, February, March—and, we learned from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Wednesday—the hottest April. In an age of rising temperatures, monthly heat records have become all too common. Still, a string of 12 of them is without precedent.
Perhaps even more remarkable is the magnitude of the new records. The extremes of recent months are such that we're only four months into 2016 and already there's a greater than 99 percent likelihood that this year will be the hottest on record, according to Gavin Schmidt, who directs NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies.


Unrecorded climate records (BILLIONS OF YEARS) (WE ARE TOLD) versus recorded climate records= STATISTICAL INSIGNIFIGANCE, YOU,VE BEEN STUNNED. BY GOOBLEDIGOOP! MANUFACTURED MUSH. SAND PANCAKES,

Scientists fear loosing thier income if they don't toe the establish line.