The Cold Truth: Icy Temps Can Slash An Electric Car's Range By More Than Half


petros
+2
#1
Heated garages are awesome for the environment!

Anyhoo I doubt the author has experienced the 5 or 6 annual Polar Vortices a real Canadian experiences.

Talk about a rough winter. Here we are approaching the end of March and Jack Frost’s icy grip still has a stranglehold on many parts of the country. And while the extreme elements already tend to exact a toll on the average car, many electric-vehicle owners may be feeling the worst of it.

That’s because an EV’s operating range on a charge can be diminished by an average of 57 percent based solely on the ambient temperature, according to the results of a study conducted by the AAA Automotive Research Center in Southern California. That could leave, for example, the owner of a Nissan Leaf with an EPA-certified range of 84 miles with a depleted battery after driving a mere 36 miles in cold weather.

Fortunately that’s still within the daily range of most drivers – according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data 68 percent of U.S. commuters travel 30 miles or less to and from work. What’s more, reasonably temperate Los Angeles and San Francisco feature the highest concentration of plug-in vehicle buyers in the nation according to Polk registration data. Still, the “low battery” warning can come up quickly – and with harsh consequences – for unprepared EV motorists traversing longer routes on chilly days.

Electric motors provide smooth operation, strong acceleration, require less maintenance than internal combustion engines, and for many motorists offer a cost effective option,” says John Nielsen, managing director, AAA Automotive Engineering and Repair. “However, EV drivers need to carefully monitor driving range in hot and cold weather.”

The AAA tested three different EVs under controlled circumstances to gauge their performance in stop-and-go-traffic according to cold, moderate and hot climactic conditions. While the test found the three models averaged a range of 105 miles at an ambient temperature of 75 degrees, this plummeted to just 43 miles when the thermometer dipped to 20 degrees. Scorching temperatures likewise adversely affected the tested vehicles, though a bit more moderately, limiting the average range to 69 miles on a charge at 95 degrees.

This probably isn’t breaking news to EV owners living north of the Mason-Dixon line, but it does help quantify what’s been a well-publicized bugaboo, namely that cold temperatures negatively affect a battery’s performance and can even hamper its ability to accept a charge under extreme conditions. Frigid temperatures also limit so-called regenerative braking, which recovers energy that would otherwise be lost during decelerating or stopping and sends it back to the battery.

And this is despite the fact that all EVs include provisions to help heat (and/or cool) the battery; usually this is via liquid or forced-air heating and/or cooling, though the Nissan Leaf uses an electric heater to keep the battery warm when the car is tethered to the power grid.

But the biggest draw on an EV battery in cold weather, again no surprise here, is the cabin heater. While gasoline engines tend to generate large amounts of heat that can be harvested to warm a car’s interior, an EV must rely on an electric-powered heater to keep a driver’s toes toasty. One solution would be to wear a heavier coat and gloves while driving and keep the climate control switched off, though that’s a sacrifice we’re willing to guess few EV drivers would be willing to make.

According to the MIT Technology Review, thermal storage materials are being developed that can be heated while an electric car is plugged in, then deliver heat to the battery for the duration of a drive, though that solution is likely years away for being ready for widespread use. In the meantime, automakers may turn to improved insulation and specific coatings on the windows to trap heat within the cabin and help minimize reliance on the heater.

And guess what? EV owners aren’t the only ones who take a hit whenever the mercury plummets. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, gasoline-powered vehicles likewise suffer diminished range (in terms of reduced fuel economy) in the cold. A conventional auto’s gas mileage in city driving is typically 12 percent lower at 20 degrees than it would be at a balmier 77 degrees, with gas/electric hybrid vehicles suffering an even greater drop of around 31 to 34 percent under the same conditions.

While none of us can do anything about the elements, the EPA says all drivers can help minimize the adverse effects of cold weather on their vehicles’ mileage by following a few simple tips:

Park the vehicle in a garage to raise the temperature of the car’s engine or battery and cabin.

Combine trips whenever possible to minimize driving with a cold engine or battery.

Avoid lead-footed acceleration, heavy braking and high-speed driving.

Don’t let the car sit at idle to warm the cabin before driving – preheat an EV’s cabin only while its plugged into a charger.

Limit use of seat warmers or defrosters (though it’s recommended EV owners use the seat warmers instead of the cabin heater to help maximize range).

Check the tire pressure regularly and maintain the optimal psi as determined by the automaker (under-inflated tires can reduce gas mileage by 0.3 percent for every 1 psi drop in pressure of all four tires).

With conventional or hybrid autos, use the type of oil recommended by the manufacturer for cold weather driving.

Remove accessories that adversely affect a vehicle’s aerodynamics, like roof racks, when not in use. As it is, more than half of an engine’s efforts goes to cutting through wind resistance at highway speeds, but colder air is denser, and it takes more effort to overcome drag.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimgorz...ore-than-half/



36 mile range in a Nissan Leaf in sub 0C?

It would take me over 9 days to drive to Winnipeg from Regina
Last edited by petros; Jan 10th, 2018 at 05:59 AM..
 
petros
#2
Why would anyone in Canada?
 
mentalfloss
#3
Beyond lithium — the search for a better battery
 
petros
#4
Which cities will they be stuck in?
 
petros
+1
#5
With cold being problematic the West Coast is the logical answer.

Will the reefers be propane or electric from the truck battery?
 
petros
#6
Company trucks would probably be perpetually on the move.

The distribution center here supplies 250 stores throughout western Canada.

Walmart Canada doesn't run their own trucks.

Bison (CPR) is their contractor.
 
petros
#7
Maybe US? Bison is Canadian
 
Cannuck
-1
#8
Well, if Pete thinks it's a bad idea, that's good enough for me.
 
captain morgan
+3
#9  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Beyond lithium — the search for a better battery

Dilithium crystals.

Give Scotty from the USS Enterprise a call, he can hook you up

Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

With cold being problematic the West Coast is the logical answer.

Will the reefers be propane or electric from the truck battery?

That is a big issue along with energy consumption on grades through steeper elevations. I'd imagine that a Tesla tractor/trailer would have to stop to recharge at least once (probably more) to climb the Coq
 
JamesBondo
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Which cities will they be stuck in?

Yes. due to limited range.
 
darkbeaver
+1
#11
Eventually electric vehicles will be powered directly from the planets magnetic field, but not before or untill the bankers are dismissed. A rural person like me would not at this time purchase one of these global warming feelgood set of wheels.
 
petros
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Well, if Pete thinks it's a bad idea, that's good enough for me.

Is it a bad idea?

With you, chances are excellent you are lying again.

Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Dilithium crystals.

Give Scotty from the USS Enterprise a call, he can hook you up



That is a big issue along with energy consumption on grades through steeper elevations. I'd imagine that a Tesla tractor/trailer would have to stop to recharge at least once (probably more) to climb the Coq

Dynamic braking charges the battery downhill.
 
darkbeaver
+1
#13
Everybody knows the west is litered with hills. insert smiley It will take three hills chargeing to get up the next hill, math is against this idea.
 
JamesBondo
+2
#14
dynamic braking produces a large amount of power over a short period of time. The only thing that a person can do with it is burn it off on a heater grid.

Charging is possible, but only at a safe charge current for the batteries.
 
Danbones
#15
90 % battery, 10 % load
 
darkbeaver
+2
#16
One way to overcome this power deficiet is to install a small wood gasifier to run a generator in addition to a wood storage compartment next to the glove box.
 
mentalfloss
#17
In cold weather, all cars get less efficient. For gasoline-powered cars, factors like cold engine oil and increased idling can reduce fuel economy in freezing conditions by 20% or more. Overall, electric cars are more efficient than gasoline cars because an electric motor is much more efficient in turning stored electricity into motion than an internal combustion engine is in converting the chemical energy of gasoline to mechanical energy.

Do Electric Cars Work in Cold Weather? Get the Facts…

 
mentalfloss
#18
Yea, that's about right.

Pretty decent mileage.
 
darkbeaver
+2
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

In cold weather, all cars get less efficient. For gasoline-powered cars, factors like cold engine oil and increased idling can reduce fuel economy in freezing conditions by 20% or more. Overall, electric cars are more efficient than gasoline cars because an electric motor is much more efficient in turning stored electricity into motion than an internal combustion engine is in converting the chemical energy of gasoline to mechanical energy.

The efficiency of the electric motor is not being questioned, battery capacity is .
 
mentalfloss
#20
People are buying, and loving, EVs in cold places

So how do EVs work in the real world for people in cold climes? The EV fleet management company Fleet Carma has tracked trips in the Nissan LEAF in Canada and the U.S. and found that overall range drops from close to 80 miles in shirtsleeve weather to 50-60 miles when driven in below freezing conditions.

This is a noticeable drop, but still leaves enough range for many drivers. For example, our survey of U.S. drivers found that 54% reported daily driving of less than 40 miles and 69% drive less than 60 miles on the average day. For a longer range EV, like the Tesla Model S or the upcoming Chevy Bolt, the impact of cold weather is likely to be less of an issue. These cars have more total range available, so any loss of range will impact driving utility less and offer drivers ample battery capacity to run both the motor and heaters for extended drives. For example, Telsa reports that their Model S 70D model loses about 19% range when driving in 0 degree Fahrenheit weather with the heater on, reducing the range to 195 miles.

Do Electric Cars Work in Cold Weather? Get the Facts…
 
Cannuck
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Is it a bad idea?

Did you not understand my post?
 
darkbeaver
+1
#22
I couldn,t plow my driveway here today with an electric vehicle if we had any snow. This would mean I would have to wait out a chargeing interruption resulting in not making the beer store on time and any electric efficiency cost saving would be wiped out by the bootlegger. So after careful evaluation I have decided to postpone any purchase of said vehicle untill and if the charge and capacity is vastly improved.
 
taxslave
+1
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Beyond lithium — the search for a better battery

FUel cells like GM is using in military vehicles.

Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

I couldn,t plow my driveway here today with an electric vehicle if we had any snow. This would mean I would have to wait out a chargeing interruption resulting in not making the beer store on time and any electric efficiency cost saving would be wiped out by the bootlegger. So after careful evaluation I have decided to postpone any purchase of said vehicle untill and if the charge and capacity is vastly improved.

Just wait for Globull warming to kick in. Should be any century now.
 
Hoid
#24
A minor engineering problem.
 
taxslave
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

A minor engineering problem.

Maybe, but it has been the one that has held back electric cars for over 100 years now.
 
darkbeaver
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

A minor engineering problem.

I have a minor engineering solution, burn your house, the solution of several hundred million, the grid is everything, I,m forcesed to guess.
You must be connected or face the consequimnces/ consequencies, fuk I JUST CAN,T SPELL THAT WORD

The Spanish inquizition, when will the world be rid of this infestation>?
 

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