Pharmaceutical GMO crops contaminating food supply


Karlin
#1
Beyond the GMO [gentically modified] crops that are Round Up ready - modified so "Round Up" herbicide can be sprayed on them - some GMO crops are grown to produce drugs for the pharmaceutical industry, actual drugs growing in the plants.

These include protiens, vaccines, and anti-bodies{link:
http://www.ucsusa.org/food_and_envir...fm?pageID=1373

These special crops are, of course, contaminating other crops that are intended to be eaten {link: http://www.ucsusa.org/food_and_envir...fm?pageID=1372

quote: "Seeds of traditional crop varieties are contaminated with genetically engineered (GE) DNA. Among the many implications of this finding, one has potentially serious human health consequences—the possibility that DNA from crops engineered to produce pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals ("pharma" crops) may contaminate the seed supply for food crops."

K - Paxil in your corn flakes anyone?
Monsanto and the Pharmaceutical industry work together on these projects, and dare I say they conspire with the FDA to allow this to happen 'on purpose'? A great experiment to get us all on drugs, or just a lack of concern about consumer choice to facilitate using the cheapest development costs for these "drug plants"?

quote: "The federal government's regulations of pharma crops do not address the possibility that pharma crops could contaminate seed production. Without stronger federal oversight, the contamination scenario depicted in this example is likely to come to pass."

K - Its not like contamination isn't a well-known issue, its been in the papers and the legal system. There is that case of the Canadian seed producer who was charged by Monsanto for "stealing" their GMO seed, which was found in his canola seed crop.

The farmer says he didn't put it there, Monsanto denies that contamination can occur.

The case went to court several times, and ultimately the farmer lost his farm over it, which had been producing high-quality canola seed for his neighbors for over 40 years. They never did declare the potential of contamination or not, legal fees wiped him out.

Monsanto now owns that farm. Monsanto is the biggest land owner in North America, with the bulk of its aqusititions coming in the past 20 years.

So we can expect no protection from the government
...but we can expect phamaceutical substances showing up in our food supply.

Even if we stick to eating organically produced foods, there is a risk of contamination, but it is much much less since organics are grown with about a 3km[?] barrier from anyone using chemicals. [GMo crops are sprayed, so that barrier would include GM croplands].
Consumers could protest by demanding labeling of Gm foods, and boycotting anything without that kind of label. That would really hit them hard if we could possibly do it, but what would we buy? - it would have to be food products with voluntary "NON-GM labelling, and "whole foods" [which are best for health anyhow].


------------------------------
Some of the compounds we will be eating besides pharmaceuticals and anti-bodies are:

Industrial Chemicals
Compounds used in the manufacture of products such as paper, plastics, personal care items, and laundry detergents.
Examples are trypsin and laccase.

Research Chemicals:
Substances used in investigative and diagnostic laboratories. Examples are avidin and beta-glucuronidase.

Vaccines
against non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, rabies, cholera, piglet diarrhea, and foot-and-mouth disease, hepatitis B, measles, polio, and various types of viral diarrhea.

http://www.ucsusa.org/food_and_envir...fm?pageID=1561

Karlin
 
Karlin
#2
Beyond the GMO [gentically modified] crops that are Round Up ready - modified so "Round Up" herbicide can be sprayed on them - some GMO crops are grown to produce drugs for the pharmaceutical industry, actual drugs growing in the plants.

These include protiens, vaccines, and anti-bodies{link:
http://www.ucsusa.org/food_and_envir...fm?pageID=1373

These special crops are, of course, contaminating other crops that are intended to be eaten {link: http://www.ucsusa.org/food_and_envir...fm?pageID=1372

quote: "Seeds of traditional crop varieties are contaminated with genetically engineered (GE) DNA. Among the many implications of this finding, one has potentially serious human health consequences—the possibility that DNA from crops engineered to produce pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals ("pharma" crops) may contaminate the seed supply for food crops."

K - Paxil in your corn flakes anyone?
Monsanto and the Pharmaceutical industry work together on these projects, and dare I say they conspire with the FDA to allow this to happen 'on purpose'? A great experiment to get us all on drugs, or just a lack of concern about consumer choice to facilitate using the cheapest development costs for these "drug plants"?

quote: "The federal government's regulations of pharma crops do not address the possibility that pharma crops could contaminate seed production. Without stronger federal oversight, the contamination scenario depicted in this example is likely to come to pass."

K - Its not like contamination isn't a well-known issue, its been in the papers and the legal system. There is that case of the Canadian seed producer who was charged by Monsanto for "stealing" their GMO seed, which was found in his canola seed crop.

The farmer says he didn't put it there, Monsanto denies that contamination can occur.

The case went to court several times, and ultimately the farmer lost his farm over it, which had been producing high-quality canola seed for his neighbors for over 40 years. They never did declare the potential of contamination or not, legal fees wiped him out.

Monsanto now owns that farm. Monsanto is the biggest land owner in North America, with the bulk of its aqusititions coming in the past 20 years.

So we can expect no protection from the government
...but we can expect phamaceutical substances showing up in our food supply.

Even if we stick to eating organically produced foods, there is a risk of contamination, but it is much much less since organics are grown with about a 3km[?] barrier from anyone using chemicals. [GMo crops are sprayed, so that barrier would include GM croplands].
Consumers could protest by demanding labeling of Gm foods, and boycotting anything without that kind of label. That would really hit them hard if we could possibly do it, but what would we buy? - it would have to be food products with voluntary "NON-GM labelling, and "whole foods" [which are best for health anyhow].


------------------------------
Some of the compounds we will be eating besides pharmaceuticals and anti-bodies are:

Industrial Chemicals
Compounds used in the manufacture of products such as paper, plastics, personal care items, and laundry detergents.
Examples are trypsin and laccase.

Research Chemicals:
Substances used in investigative and diagnostic laboratories. Examples are avidin and beta-glucuronidase.

Vaccines
against non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, rabies, cholera, piglet diarrhea, and foot-and-mouth disease, hepatitis B, measles, polio, and various types of viral diarrhea.

http://www.ucsusa.org/food_and_envir...fm?pageID=1561

Karlin
 
Karlin
#3
Beyond the GMO [gentically modified] crops that are Round Up ready - modified so "Round Up" herbicide can be sprayed on them - some GMO crops are grown to produce drugs for the pharmaceutical industry, actual drugs growing in the plants.

These include protiens, vaccines, and anti-bodies{link:
http://www.ucsusa.org/food_and_envir...fm?pageID=1373

These special crops are, of course, contaminating other crops that are intended to be eaten {link: http://www.ucsusa.org/food_and_envir...fm?pageID=1372

quote: "Seeds of traditional crop varieties are contaminated with genetically engineered (GE) DNA. Among the many implications of this finding, one has potentially serious human health consequences—the possibility that DNA from crops engineered to produce pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals ("pharma" crops) may contaminate the seed supply for food crops."

K - Paxil in your corn flakes anyone?
Monsanto and the Pharmaceutical industry work together on these projects, and dare I say they conspire with the FDA to allow this to happen 'on purpose'? A great experiment to get us all on drugs, or just a lack of concern about consumer choice to facilitate using the cheapest development costs for these "drug plants"?

quote: "The federal government's regulations of pharma crops do not address the possibility that pharma crops could contaminate seed production. Without stronger federal oversight, the contamination scenario depicted in this example is likely to come to pass."

K - Its not like contamination isn't a well-known issue, its been in the papers and the legal system. There is that case of the Canadian seed producer who was charged by Monsanto for "stealing" their GMO seed, which was found in his canola seed crop.

The farmer says he didn't put it there, Monsanto denies that contamination can occur.

The case went to court several times, and ultimately the farmer lost his farm over it, which had been producing high-quality canola seed for his neighbors for over 40 years. They never did declare the potential of contamination or not, legal fees wiped him out.

Monsanto now owns that farm. Monsanto is the biggest land owner in North America, with the bulk of its aqusititions coming in the past 20 years.

So we can expect no protection from the government
...but we can expect phamaceutical substances showing up in our food supply.

Even if we stick to eating organically produced foods, there is a risk of contamination, but it is much much less since organics are grown with about a 3km[?] barrier from anyone using chemicals. [GMo crops are sprayed, so that barrier would include GM croplands].
Consumers could protest by demanding labeling of Gm foods, and boycotting anything without that kind of label. That would really hit them hard if we could possibly do it, but what would we buy? - it would have to be food products with voluntary "NON-GM labelling, and "whole foods" [which are best for health anyhow].


------------------------------
Some of the compounds we will be eating besides pharmaceuticals and anti-bodies are:

Industrial Chemicals
Compounds used in the manufacture of products such as paper, plastics, personal care items, and laundry detergents.
Examples are trypsin and laccase.

Research Chemicals:
Substances used in investigative and diagnostic laboratories. Examples are avidin and beta-glucuronidase.

Vaccines
against non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, rabies, cholera, piglet diarrhea, and foot-and-mouth disease, hepatitis B, measles, polio, and various types of viral diarrhea.

http://www.ucsusa.org/food_and_envir...fm?pageID=1561

Karlin
 
peapod
#4
Thanks for those links Karlin. I read this a few weeks ago.

UK: January 18, 2005


LONDON - Growing drugs inside plants -- instead of making them in factories -- could soon be big business with the US market alone potentially worth $2.2 billion by 2011, according to a report on Monday.


A number of companies are currently looking at ways to make complex drugs, such as antibodies and vaccines, inside genetically modified corn and other farm crops.
The first commercially available drugs made this way could be available around 2006, according to consultancy firm Frost & Sullivan.

"There is currently a shortfall in biopharmaceutical manufacturing facilities, which leaves great market potential for biopharmaceuticals produced from plants," Frost & Sullivan analyst Phil Webster said.

A number of start-up biotechnology companies are working in the area and some large multinational firms, such as Switzerland's Syngenta AG and US-based Dow Chemical Co, have also invested in the idea.

But so-called biopharming faces significant challenges -- not least overcoming public fears that creating new crops engineered to make medicines could jeopardise the food supply.

The nascent biopharming business suffered a setback in 2002 when plants from a test crop grown by US firm ProdiGene Inc contaminated a soybean crop grown for food the following year.



REUTERS NEWS SERVICE
 
peapod
#5
Thanks for those links Karlin. I read this a few weeks ago.

UK: January 18, 2005


LONDON - Growing drugs inside plants -- instead of making them in factories -- could soon be big business with the US market alone potentially worth $2.2 billion by 2011, according to a report on Monday.


A number of companies are currently looking at ways to make complex drugs, such as antibodies and vaccines, inside genetically modified corn and other farm crops.
The first commercially available drugs made this way could be available around 2006, according to consultancy firm Frost & Sullivan.

"There is currently a shortfall in biopharmaceutical manufacturing facilities, which leaves great market potential for biopharmaceuticals produced from plants," Frost & Sullivan analyst Phil Webster said.

A number of start-up biotechnology companies are working in the area and some large multinational firms, such as Switzerland's Syngenta AG and US-based Dow Chemical Co, have also invested in the idea.

But so-called biopharming faces significant challenges -- not least overcoming public fears that creating new crops engineered to make medicines could jeopardise the food supply.

The nascent biopharming business suffered a setback in 2002 when plants from a test crop grown by US firm ProdiGene Inc contaminated a soybean crop grown for food the following year.



REUTERS NEWS SERVICE
 
peapod
#6
Thanks for those links Karlin. I read this a few weeks ago.

UK: January 18, 2005


LONDON - Growing drugs inside plants -- instead of making them in factories -- could soon be big business with the US market alone potentially worth $2.2 billion by 2011, according to a report on Monday.


A number of companies are currently looking at ways to make complex drugs, such as antibodies and vaccines, inside genetically modified corn and other farm crops.
The first commercially available drugs made this way could be available around 2006, according to consultancy firm Frost & Sullivan.

"There is currently a shortfall in biopharmaceutical manufacturing facilities, which leaves great market potential for biopharmaceuticals produced from plants," Frost & Sullivan analyst Phil Webster said.

A number of start-up biotechnology companies are working in the area and some large multinational firms, such as Switzerland's Syngenta AG and US-based Dow Chemical Co, have also invested in the idea.

But so-called biopharming faces significant challenges -- not least overcoming public fears that creating new crops engineered to make medicines could jeopardise the food supply.

The nascent biopharming business suffered a setback in 2002 when plants from a test crop grown by US firm ProdiGene Inc contaminated a soybean crop grown for food the following year.



REUTERS NEWS SERVICE
 
Twila
#7
So does this mean we'll be charged for the product, taxed and then charged a dispensing fee?
 
Twila
#8
So does this mean we'll be charged for the product, taxed and then charged a dispensing fee?
 
Twila
#9
So does this mean we'll be charged for the product, taxed and then charged a dispensing fee?
 

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