Chavez: Here Comes Socialism


earth_as_one
#31
I wouldn't consider subsidizing 100,000,000 gallons of heating oil a token amount, especially since neither Bush nor Cheney have not offered to subsidize even a single gallon of heating oil for the poor.

If this is an example of an attack on the American government, then I say "Bring 'em on". I am not afraid of Venezuelan oil tankers loaded with subsidized heating oil for the poor.

Bush could learn a lesson or two from Chavez about how to attack other governments.
 
earth_as_one
#32
The only examples I can find of outright farm seizures in Venezuela were when the owners were convicted of using their land to smuggle drugs.

Parts of some farms were seized when the ownership was unclear. In those cases the government only seized the unused parts. The landowners did not loose any land they were currently using. The landowners can challenge the siezure in court and if they are able to prove they actually owned the land, then they will be compensated.

Quote:

...The recent government interventions, despite all the mass media hype about the violation of private property, have shown what the real purpose of the land reform is. Rather than denying the right to private property, in many ways the government has extended it to large numbers of poor people, those who have never had any productive property.

The government has made it clear that anyone who can prove their legal title to the land they claim will not have it confiscated. In the case of lands that have been confiscated so far, none of the so-called owners have been able to prove their legal title to the land. In many cases, these were large tracts of state-owned land that were occupied by and then passed down along the family line but never legally acquired.

In cases where land ownership can be proven, the government has repeatedly stated its willingness to negotiate with the landholder to discuss how they can work together to increase production...

http://www.worldpress.org/Americas/2161.cfm

I'm not saying I agree with this. Just clarifying Venzuela's land reform policies.
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by earth_as_one View Post

So were Nelson Mandela and Ghandi.

Chavez doesn't resemble any of these leaders.

Theere are similarities, but he he's simply a minor-league, little, power-hungry dictator. Kinda like Idi Amin Dada, Simon Bolivar, etc.
 
Toro
#34
Hugh has decided that the central bank should be under his total control.

Can you say "hyperinflation?"

Its like a bad re-run of the 1970s all over again.
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#35
Guess it won't be long before those poor people will be like we BCers whenever the NaiveDensePussies get in: "Oh, woe is me".
 
I think not
#36
Chavez is my hero.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+1
#37
Bush was once popular, too.

Today he looks like a beaten step child.
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not View Post

Chavez is my hero.

lol That sounds like a personal problem.
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#39
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

Bush was once popular, too.

Today he looks like a beaten step child.

Funny, I always thought he looked like a chimp : link
 
earth_as_one
#40
I was reserving judgement until I knew the terms under which Chavez intended to nationalize.

The news portrays Chavez's plans to nationalize CANTV as unfair. But its hard to say. If Venezuela pays less for the company to compensate for the company not paying employee pensions as they should have, then that would be fair.

I'm still reserving judgement.
 
Colpy
Conservative
#41
Quote: Originally Posted by earth_as_one View Post

I was reserving judgement until I knew the terms under which Chavez intended to nationalize.

The news portrays Chavez's plans to nationalize CANTV as unfair. But its hard to say. If Venezuela pays less for the company to compensate for the company not paying employee pensions as they should have, then that would be fair.

I'm still reserving judgement.

Congrats Earth as One.......that almost sounds sensible!
 
earth_as_one
#42
Quote: Originally Posted by Colpy View Post

Congrats Earth as One.......that almost sounds sensible!

Like I said I'm reserving judgement.

This is Chavez's first move with his new mandate to nationalize.

Notice Verizon climbed as the news broke.

Chavez:
Quote:

"I‘ll pay when the law dictates and in the form the government decides. I‘m going to tell them that CANTV was given away, and that they shouldn‘t come here saying it must be paid for at the international price," he said.

Sounds to me like this is far from settled. Chavez appears to lack the authority to dictate. The Venezuelan government committed the coup d'etat to CANTV's board of directors.

http://www.onelocalnews.com/whiteroc...47444&source=2

Chavez's power lies in appointing the new board of directors.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#43
The Corporate Media's 'Chavez'

Cool Observer
- Mickey Z. - I've been extremely fortunate to attract an amazing mix of regulars to my blog...a crew self-dubbed "The Expendables." The conversations range from serious to silly and often have nothing to do with my post for the day. The topic du jour on Friday, January 19 was a certain Venezuelan president.

www.mickeyz.net


The Corporate Media and Hugo Chavez

Mickey Z.


Cool Observer
Jan 22 2007


Paul M. wrote: "Hello all Expendables. What do you make of the latest accusations leveled at Chavez?"
Paul was referring a BBC News report, "Rule by decree passed for Chavez" (Subtitled: "Venezuela's National Assembly has given initial approval to a bill granting the president the power to bypass congress and rule by decree for 18 months"). The article began: "President Hugo Chavez says he wants 'revolutionary laws' to enact sweeping political, economic, and social changes." In the name of strengthening his "Bolivarian revolution," it seems Chavez has said he wants to "nationalize key sectors of the economy and scrap limits on the terms a president can serve." He also wants to see "major Venezuelan power and telecoms companies come under state control ... (and) an end to foreign ownership of lucrative crude oil refineries in the Orinoco region."
Paul M. added: "I totally oppose authoritarianism in all its forms, and idiotic Socialists/Marxists are always susceptible to this, but I'm wondering if it's the BBC reporting a lot of **** again."
My response: "Who knows? I certainly don't trust the corporate media as an objective source, re: official U.S. enemies. But, of course, Chavez is human and thus capable of such behavior. What does everyone else think?"
Here's a sampling of Expendable comments (based on what was known on Jan. 19):
Deb: "It initially looks bad, but I'd want to hear perspectives from the people in Venezuela. One thing I've noticed is that Chavez keeps giving to the people - the poor people. That is one big reason the fathead leaders will view him with suspicion and try to make him sound like a tyrant. We 'democratically' elect our tyrants who continually take from the poor to give to the rich. Is an authoritarian leader who takes from the rich to give to the poor really a worse choice? I don't have much of an opinion on the latest from the BBC until I hear what the people in Venezuela have to say. I just don't know enough of the situation to be able to see on my own what the BBC isn't saying."
Zenprole: "If there is any truth to this Chavez story, I think he's making a big mistake. In the past, he has used presidential power to blunt antidemocratic efforts to undermine the Bolivarian program (firing oil industry provocateurs, for instance), but has wisely and strongly kept within the Constitutional framework (unlike some presidents we could mention). Whatever the reason for this decree power (if the story is accurate), it likely won't outweigh the rationalizations it will give the U.S. to ramp up attacks. And this may just be another case of an independent government being under such constant pressure that this is a response rather than an initiative. I'd like to learn more about this. Thanks for the link, Paul."
Edson: "As for Chavez, I don't see what the big deal is. The West always preaches about what a great system we have because there are checks and balances on power and those who wield it. So then, how to explain the absolute mess we've made of this planet? Where are the checks and balances to the greed of the ruling oligarchy? I'd rather have a guy like Chavez or Castro in charge than a democratic government like Harper's (up here in Canuckistan) or Bush's."
RMJ: "I agree with Edson. Chavez is a lot better than most. As far as ruling by decree goes, I think a Benevolent Monarchy would be better than the corrupt, oppressive, bought-and-paid-for Predatory Capitalism that exists in the USA. A Benevolent Monarchy would be an improvement over a Corpocracy. Chavez gave U.S. citizens some oil to heat their homes. The U.S. government says, 'Let 'em freeze to death'."
And finally, JOS summed up: "Long live the Bolivarian Revolution! I am sure his congress is littered with scum-elected on CIA money and U.S. propaganda-that would simply block him from completing the steps the people elected him to accomplish. Taking back businesses and resources from foreign corporate multi-nationals sounds like a great thing."
That's what some of us think...how about you?



I hope he nationalizes everything , watercoolers, pencil sharpeners and sex.








 
cortex
#44
yepp
 
I think not
#45
What are you guys using as a model? North Korea? Cuba? Vietnam?
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#46
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not View Post

What are you guys using as a model? North Korea? Cuba? Vietnam?

And quess who's meddled in each of these countrys with the cost of about six million deaths not counting the stiff yanks it produced.
 
I think not
#47
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

And quess who's meddled in each of these countrys with the cost of about six million deaths not counting the stiff yanks it produced.

Nice dodge. I didn't think you would have a well thought response.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#48
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not View Post

Nice dodge. I didn't think you would have a well thought response.

I expended roughly the same thought as you did with your question, the laws of conservation apply.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+1
#49
Strange isn't it, how right wingers object to socialism in Venezuela but applaud it in Israel.
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#50
Another strange one is how people can pick one side to support when both sides are screwy. lol

Kinda like one person supporting 2+2=3 and the other person supporting 2+2=5 so they argue while 2+2=4 stands there laughing at the both of them.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+1
#51
selectivity = proof of prejudice
 
vinod1975
#52
 
Tonington
#53
Quote: Originally Posted by L Gilbert View Post

Another strange one is how people can pick one side to support when both sides are screwy. lol

Kinda like one person supporting 2+2=3 and the other person supporting 2+2=5 so they argue while 2+2=4 stands there laughing at the both of them.

Yeah, that about sums it up. Next they argue which came first, 3 or 5.
 
vinod1975
#54
Where the situation is like 2+2 = 5 or 2+2 = 4 what I think the correct party needs to keep silent untill and unless there is need of argument
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#55
Laughing is more fun the keeping clam. Humor = good medicine.
 
vinod1975
#56
When u have to laugh then before that u need to check on whom u are laughing

All respect
No Offence
 
L Gilbert
No Party Affiliation
#57
Good point. Then in that case, one needs to be diplomatic and explain that it was the situation not the people that inspired the mirth.
 
vinod1975
#58
one or the other time yes you have to be diplomatic
 
Walter
#59
The Disciples of Keynes Are Today's 'Flat Earthers'
https://www.realclearmarkets.com/art...es_103847.html

So true.
 

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