Liberals to announce marijuana will be legal by July 1, 2018


Kreskin
+1
#91
The only thing I'm addicted to right now is sugar. I might take up smoking again to get rid of sugar fits.
 
Ludlow
No Party Affiliation
+1
#92
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

you gotta crush on her Ludlow?

just askin

I know I'd find her hawt too if I was really really really on acid or pcp

and a boxing glove full of viagra

Late friend of mine knew Hillary way back when. She told me that Mrs. Clinton was a brass balled biotch..No, I still have a crush on Audrey Hepburn. .
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#93
yeah good taste lives on

I kinda liked Grace Kelly myself
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#94
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Then you can keep yourself in the vegetative stage.

Grow or die that's what I alwys say, don't be in a hrurry to produce some little flower and have a bee get away with the whole thing. That is the law.

You know nothing about laws.
 
Curious Cdn
No Party Affiliation
#95
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Pain is weakness leaving the body.

A lot of pain may be life leaving the body.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
+1
#96
I drive dangerous goods. Jet fuel, gasoline, aviation gas, and diesel. I don't drink when I drive and I sure as hell wouldn't smoke pot when I drive.

As it stands now, I don't smoke pot because I am randomly tested for it. But I also suffer severe tinnitus and once it is legalized I will probably have a puff or two (as I have had in the past and found it to help) to help me sleep.
And I would probably occasionally use it in a recreational setting. But, like alcohol, I would not use it and drive. In fact I support more stringent testing for people who drive.

The present testing is useless because it is based on a minimum threshold that can go back a couple weeks after a person has used or ingested cannabis and is no longer impaired.

Legalizing the stuff isn't going to make more people drive stoned. Anyone stupid enough to smoke up and drive is already doing that. As it stands right now there is no credible testing, but they are working on a swab test.
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
#97
It'll take a year for Monsanto and palls to patent their Frankenweed and it will be sprayed with Roundup and be half the potency of street weed. They will regulate it to the point that the black market will barely notice a blip in sales. People can grow 4 plants but will it have to be government sanctioned Frankenweed? I guess we have to wait and see but I don't trust the Liberals to do the right thing.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+2
#98
Quote: Originally Posted by Ludlow View Post

Late friend of mine knew Hillary way back when. She told me that Mrs. Clinton was a brass balled biotch..No, I still have a crush on Audrey Hepburn. .


Yeah, but she's pretty dead!

Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_Soldier View Post

I drive dangerous goods. Jet fuel, gasoline, aviation gas, and diesel. I don't drink when I drive and I sure as hell wouldn't smoke pot when I drive.

As it stands now, I don't smoke pot because I am randomly tested for it. But I also suffer severe tinnitus and once it is legalized I will probably have a puff or two (as I have had in the past and found it to help) to help me sleep.
And I would probably occasionally use it in a recreational setting. But, like alcohol, I would not use it and drive. In fact I support more stringent testing for people who drive.

The present testing is useless because it is based on a minimum threshold that can go back a couple weeks after a person has used or ingested cannabis and is no longer impaired.

Legalizing the stuff isn't going to make more people drive stoned. Anyone stupid enough to smoke up and drive is already doing that. As it stands right now there is no credible testing, but they are working on a swab test.


I'm certainly no expert on the matter, BUT I've heard it said many times that there are many people who don't smoke pot solely because it is illegal and they are not the type of people who would deliberately break the law. I can understand that because if I know something is against the law, I won't do it. Thirty years ago that wouldn't have necessarily been the case. People's philosophy change as they age.
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I'm certainly no expert on the matter, BUT I've heard it said many times that there are many people who don't smoke pot solely because it is illegal and they are not the type of people who would deliberately break the law. I can understand that because if I know something is against the law, I won't do it. Thirty years ago that wouldn't have necessarily been the case. People's philosophy change as they age.

There are so many laws that you can't make it through a single day without breaking at least one. The powers that be are very selective about which ones they enforce but if they want to get you, they aren't too fussy how. People have been busted on obscure laws that nobody even knew were there.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#100
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

There are so many laws that you can't make it through a single day without breaking at least one. The powers that be are very selective about which ones they enforce but if they want to get you, they aren't too fussy how. People have been busted on obscure laws that nobody even knew were there.


Yep, probably has something to do with the old adage "Ignorance of the law is no excuse for breaking it"
 
Jinentonix
No Party Affiliation
#101
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Well, the last time you heard "the bee's knees" was this morning, so there!

"Spare a square" is semi-ironic nostalgia-speak. The person you heard it from probably didn't know the origin either.

About half the Black people I ran across in Minneapolis.

Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

I understand that, and that might be a time when I'd take an opiod. I'm just saying that I'd take it only as a last resort. Again, I'm not arrogant enough to believe that I'm somehow immune to addiction.

That's how I use my oxys, as a last resort. For those days when it hurts to move anything including my chest and back simply from the movement of my breathing. Fortunately I have fewer of those than I used to so my doc isn't reluctant to prescribe oxys to me. Normally, a 20 count script will last me 6-8 months, sometimes longer. Plus I hate the damn things so addiction isn't much of a concern.
 
JamesBondo
#102
For those days where it hurts to move, I remember that I got to this place because I didn't move enough. So I get up and I move what I can. Because I can.
 
Curious Cdn
No Party Affiliation
#103
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

About half the Black people I ran across in Minneapolis.

Did you stop to check to see if any of them were hurt or did you just keep driving?
 
Johnnny
No Party Affiliation
+1
#104
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_Soldier View Post

I drive dangerous goods. Jet fuel, gasoline, aviation gas, and diesel. I don't drink when I drive and I sure as hell wouldn't smoke pot when I drive.

As it stands now, I don't smoke pot because I am randomly tested for it. But I also suffer severe tinnitus and once it is legalized I will probably have a puff or two (as I have had in the past and found it to help) to help me sleep.
And I would probably occasionally use it in a recreational setting. But, like alcohol, I would not use it and drive. In fact I support more stringent testing for people who drive.

The present testing is useless because it is based on a minimum threshold that can go back a couple weeks after a person has used or ingested cannabis and is no longer impaired.

Legalizing the stuff isn't going to make more people drive stoned. Anyone stupid enough to smoke up and drive is already doing that. As it stands right now there is no credible testing, but they are working on a swab test.

swab test works, ive seen it used in a field camp in Northern Sask...
 
JamesBondo
#105
I don't use the stuff because I think it is for losers.
 
Ludlow
No Party Affiliation
#106
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

About half the Black people I ran across in Minneapolis.

That's how I use my oxys, as a last resort. For those days when it hurts to move anything including my chest and back simply from the movement of my breathing. Fortunately I have fewer of those than I used to so my doc isn't reluctant to prescribe oxys to me. Normally, a 20 count script will last me 6-8 months, sometimes longer. Plus I hate the damn things so addiction isn't much of a concern.

I haven't got a new script and have gone about six weeks without. I was taking 4 5mg a day for some time. Sometimes I get sharp pains in my leg that feel like a knife slashing through but I've been taking tylenol. I can't take ibuprophen or aleve. The Lyrica helps with the neuropothy pain.

Percosets take away the pain but you get use to them and you get to needing more and more.
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#107
My buddy just spent two weeks on the couch puking his guts out and pooping through a straw getting off of Dr prescribed perks.

Dr prescribed downers, ssri's, and opiates are far worse then weed.
FIFTH ESTATE
Billions wasted on drug spending in Canada, research shows
Billions wasted on drug spending in Canada, research shows - Health - CBC News

far fikking worse

"What I didn’t know was that my time in medical school had coincided with a boom in the prescribing of narcotics by outpatient doctors, driven partly by the pharmaceutical companies that sold those drugs. Between 1999 and 2010, sales of these “opioid analgesics”—medications like Vicodin, Percocet, and OxyContin—quadrupled.

By 2010, the United States, with about five per cent of the world’s population, was consuming ninety-nine per cent of the world’s hydrocodone (the narcotic in Vicodin), along with eighty per cent of the oxycodone (in Percocet and OxyContin), and sixty-five per cent of the hydromorphone (in Dilaudid).

As narcotics prescriptions surged, so did deaths from opioid-analgesic overdoses—from about four thousand to almost seventeen thousand. Studies have shown that patients who receive narcotics for chronic pain are less likely to recover function, and are less likely to go back to work. The potential side effects of prescription narcotics include constipation, sexual dysfunction, cognitive impairment, addiction, and overdosing. When patients receive narcotics for long periods, they can even become more sensitive to pain, a condition called hyperalgesia. (J. David Haddox, the vice-president of health policy at Purdue Pharma—the manufacturer of OxyContin—acknowledged “opioid analgesics have sometimes been associated with diminished pain relief in the face of increasing doses.”)

And then there are the real-life Walter Whites. I once helped care for a patient with lung cancer who wasn’t taking his narcotics, unbeknownst to his doctors. This patient’s cancer had spread to his bones and other organs, which can be incredibly painful. But he was selling his prescription narcotics to help support his wife and himself. So when given these high-dose narcotics in the hospital, he overdosed—though not fatally, fortunately.

What’s more, no medication reliably eliminates pain in all patients, and narcotics are no exception. And there isn’t good evidence that the prescription of narcotics to treat chronic, non-cancer pain is effective over long periods: most studies of prescription narcotics last only twelve to sixteen weeks.

The use of prescription narcotics, and the problems associated with them, are so pervasive that, last month, the Food and Drug Administration recommended tightening regulations for how doctors prescribe some of the most commonly used narcotic painkillers.

How did doctors, who pledge to do no harm, let the use of prescription narcotics get so out of hand?"
http://www.newyorker.com/business/cu...-pill-epidemic

MONEY

oh yeah then there is the record dope production in afghanistan over seen by the US troops who took over for the Taliban who would cut your head off for growing it.
GREED, STUPIDITY and MONEY

Quote: Originally Posted by JamesBondo View Post

I don't use the stuff because I think it is for losers.

Do you know how pot works as an antihistamine, and reduces certain types of crippling inflammation?
I'm guessing no...


...not to mention some of the most successful art ever produced was created by people who use the stuff.

some of them are considered winners
Last edited by Danbones; Apr 1st, 2017 at 08:48 AM..
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#108
Quote: Originally Posted by Kreskin View Post

The only thing I'm addicted to right now is sugar. I might take up smoking again to get rid of sugar fits.


Would it be wise to try switching to honey before smoking?
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#109
Quote: Originally Posted by JamesBondo View Post

I don't use the stuff because I think it is for losers.

Do you drink alcohol?
 
captain morgan
No Party Affiliation
+2
#110


Weird orgies and wild parties?

... Well, I'm sold - count me in on this
 
Ludlow
No Party Affiliation
+1
#111
The govt. will tax the livin shyt out of it like eveything else. Tobacco has killed millions yet provides all that tax money so fukk the consumer.Same with this shyt.

Quote: Originally Posted by JamesBondo View Post

I don't use the stuff because I think it is for losers.

Get you some pain that feels like a knife is being stuck in your leg azzhole and then ridicule those seeking relief.
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#112
seeking relief is how the bastards get us
 
Jinentonix
No Party Affiliation
#113
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Did you stop to check to see if any of them were hurt or did you just keep driving?

Ran across, not over.

Quote: Originally Posted by Ludlow View Post

The govt. will tax the livin shyt out of it like eveything else. Tobacco has killed millions yet provides all that tax money so fukk the consumer.Same with this shyt.

I've already submitted a proposal showing how they could tax marijuana at 5x the rate they currently tax tobacco, and still keep it well below street prices.
Tobacco kills millions because it's a carcinogen, even in the form of chaw.
Marijuana as a carcinogen is highly debatable. Yes, one could conceivably get lung cancer from smoking it but there are also ways around that.
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#114
you forget liebarrel INVESTORS
Liberal CFO could rake in marijuana money with legalization

Chuck Rifici co-founded Tweed Marijuana Inc., buying the abandoned Hershey chocolate factory in Smiths Falls, and acquiring Canada's first license to produce medical marijuana in Jan., 2014.

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He may volunteer in his role as chief financial officer with the Liberal Party of Canada, but Chuck Rifici is in line for a big pay day, thanks to one of the party's key platforms.

Rifici, who has been a member of the Liberal national board of directors since 2011, is also the co-founder of Tweed Marijuana Inc., Canada's biggest full-scale producer of government-sanctioned pot producer, which is based in Smiths Falls, ONT.

Ont.

"I'm simply a shareholder," said Rifici in an e-mail to the Sun on Wednesday.

In the midst of the recent election campaign, Rifici branched out with two new ventures.

He was named director of the only licensed medicinal marijuana grower in Alberta, and launched a new company that seeks to cash in on the legal marijuana trade in the U.S., where business is booming.

The sum of his work in the industry has critics suggesting his cozy relationship with the governing party could constitute a conflict of interest, especially if any of his private business interests are rewarded with fat contracts once new marijuana legislation is passed.

Rifici brushed off concerns about his political connections.

"As for my volunteering as CFO (of) the Liberal Party, I have no role in policy making nor in policy decisions, no role in the transition, no future role in government and, as incorrectly previously reported, I am not an adviser to Justin Trudeau nor am I close to him," he said.

Rifici had come under fire a year ago while serving both as CFO of the party and CEO of Tweed, with a spokesman for former public safety minister Steven Blaney telling Postmedia that legalization "would benefit Mr. Trudeau's close millionaire friends that are marketing marijuana to Canadians."

Rifici stepped down as Tweed CEO, insisting at the time the move had nothing to do with political connections.

However he is still listed as the single largest shareholder.

While Tweed currently deals strictly in medicinal cannabis, the operation is poised to expand its reach if Trudeau follows through on his campaign pledge to legalize recreational marijuana.

Rifici is already richer -- by nearly $5 million -- since election day.

With 7.8 million shares to his name in the newly renamed Canopy Growth Corp., Rifici watched the once-slumping stocks soar in the days following the election.

Shares that were trading at $2 at the opening bell on Oct. 19 spiked to $2.58 by week's end, with the value of Rifici's stake in the company jumping from $15 million to $20 million overnight.

But the Liberal party denied any conflict of interest in an emailed statement that closely resembled Rifici's own.

A party spokesman said Rifici's role "consists strictly of assisting the board on finance-related matters," and that he has no role in policy decisions, with "thousands" of Liberals adopting the resolution to legalize and regulate marijuana at the party's January 2012 convention.

"Our official position is rooted in the democratic will of our members and has nothing to do with Mr. Rifici's personal views on the matter," said spokesman Olivier Duchesneau.

Health Canada expects the number of Canadians using medicinal marijuana to rise tenfold, to 450,000 people, over the next decade.

Companies such as Canopy, though, are eyeing a much more lucrative market.

"We're excited about where we're sitting, because we are the biggest production platform in Canada, and probably in the world for legally available marijuana," said current Canopy CEO Bruce Linton, whose three growhouses in Smiths Falls, Toronto and Niagara are ready and waiting for the green light to open the supply lines to a vast recreational marijuana market.

"We have 500,000 square feet of production facility, which is, by any account, an awful lot. And so we feel kind of like the next race is starting, and all this effort and building and acquisition and construction -- it's a race and that puts us in the pole position."

It's put Rifici in a good position right from the firing of the starting gun.

In August, Rifici was named to the board of directors at Aurora Cannabis Inc., a Western Canada marijuana grower with similar aspirations.

And in September, with the election campaign in full sway, Rifici launched Nesta Holding Co., an investment firm specializing in "acquiring, cultivating and monetizing cannabis businesses for the U.S. market."

Several American jurisdictions have already legalized marijuana. Massive commercialization of the product in Colorado netted an estimated $700 million in revenue from recreational marijuana in 2014 alone.

Meanwhile, medicinal marijuana prescriptions in the state have tripled, attributed to the social acceptance that comes along with legalization.

Health Canada has estimated the medicinal marijuana market could be worth $1.3 billion in Canada in 10 years, and those estimates predate Trudeau's legalization pledge. There have been no reliable estimates on how much the recreational market might be worth if legislators end prohibition and regulate the drug in a manner similar to alcohol.

Chuck Rifici's Resume

1995-2005: By the time he obtained his MBA from Queen's in 2005, Rifici had already launched or acquired several telecom companies, including internet service provider Cyberus, and worked as a CFO with Select Start Studios, later sold to Shopify.

2011: appointed CFO of Liberal Party of Canada by interim party leader Bob Rae, an appointment upheld by incoming Liberal leader Justin Trudeau.

2013: co-founded Tweed Marijuana Inc., buying the abandoned Hershey chocolate factory in Smiths Falls, and acquiring Canada's fifth license to produce medical marijuana in Jan., 2014.

2014: went public in April, with Tweed becoming the first marijuana company trading on the TSX.

- named to top Forty under 40 by Ottawa Business Journal, alumnus of the year by the University of Ottawa faculty of engineering, and exceptional new business award by Ottawa Chamber of Commerce.

- stepped down as CEO of Tweed shortly after Minister of Public Safety Steven Blaney criticized the relationship between Rifici and Liberal leader Justin Trudeau.

Aug. 2015: appointed to the board of Aurora Cannabis, Inc., an Alberta-based licensed marijuana producer.

Oct. 2015: launched Nesta Holding Co., focused on “acquiring, cultivating and monetizing cannabis businesses for the U.S. market.

Liberal CFO could rake in marijuana money with legalization | Ottawa & Region |
 
petros
#115
Strange that I have never heard a single Ecofascist complain about all the energy consumed to grow weed indoors in Canada.

It's a product that is the furthest from being "green" on the market.
 
Curious Cdn
No Party Affiliation
#116
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Strange that I have never heard a single Ecofascist complain about all the energy consumed to grow weed indoors in Canada.

Good point. Those grow-ops suck a lot of current. Add hydroponics gear and they aren't green, at all.

I wonder if GM weed is out there, now ... some post-grad's little project?
 
petros
#117
Quote:

Chuck Rifici co-founded Tweed Marijuana Inc., buying the abandoned Hershey chocolate factory in Smiths Falls, and acquiring Canada's first license to produce medical marijuana in Jan., 2014.

Prairie Plant was the first licensed grower. They grew in a mine I once worked in.
 
Curious Cdn
No Party Affiliation
#118
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Prairie Plant was the first licensed grower. They grew in a mine I once worked in.

Uranium?
 
petros
#119
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Good point. Those grow-ops suck a lot of current. Add hydroponics gear and they aren't green, at all.

I wonder if GM weed is out there, now ... some post-grad's little project?

Indoors hydroponic or in dirt it's about the same.
 
Jinentonix
No Party Affiliation
+1
#120
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

My buddy just spent two weeks on the couch puking his guts out and pooping through a straw getting off of Dr prescribed perks.

Dr prescribed downers, ssri's, and opiates are far worse then weed.
FIFTH ESTATE
Billions wasted on drug spending in Canada, research shows
Billions wasted on drug spending in Canada, research shows - Health - CBC News

....

That's also the beauty of weed, it's not physically addicting. No nasty withdrawal symptoms when you decide to give a it a break for a while. It's also not water soluble, which means unlike alcohol, cocaine, opiates and even the off the shelf pain relievers, it doesn't get filtered through your liver and kidneys.
Every time I have to take one of my pills, I keep wondering how much more damage I'm doing to my liver and kidneys.