Wife pleads for Hamilton man's safe return


spaminator
+1
#91
Millard's gun dealer handed 11 years for peddling murder weapons
Sam Pazzano Courts Bureau
More from Sam Pazzano Courts Bureau
Published:
January 12, 2018
Updated:
January 12, 2018 10:48 PM EST
Matthew Ward-Jackson sold a gun to Dellen Millard (Twitter)
A Toronto man who sold multiple guns to convicted killer Dellen Millard, including the one used in Tim Bosma’s murder, was sentenced to 11 years in prison on Friday.
“Matthew Ward-Jackson falls into the category of one of the worst firearms offenders,” said Justice Jane Kelly in passing sentence on Millard’s 30-year-old acquaintance.
Dellen Millard
Ward-Jackson, wearing a blue track jacket and sporting prominent tattoos on his head and face, grumbled and shook his head in the prisoner’s box after hearing the sentence.
He pleaded guilty to nine weapons-related charges last year.
Kelly said if the repeat offender — who was already under a firearms prohibition at the time — hadn’t pleaded guilty she would have jailed him for “13 years or possibly more.”
His 11-year sentence was reduced by seven years, four months and two weeks after Kelly gave the gun dealer credit for time already served in prison and the harsh jail conditions. Ward-Jackson has three years, seven months and two weeks remaining on his sentence.
Ward-Jackson “claims he didn’t know that the firearms would result in the deaths of two people,” said Kelly.
Text messages between Millard and Ward-Jackson showed otherwise, she added.
Tim Bosma holds his daughter. The 32-year-old went missing from his Ancaster home after two men came to test drive his truck that was up for sale on May 6, 2013.
Between February and September of 2012, Ward-Jackson sold three handguns to Millard and knew one weapon was being used criminally, said Kelly. That gun, a Walther PPK handgun, was used to murder Bosma in 2013 as his killers went on a test drive of the Ancaster man’s truck.
Millard and Mark Smich were convicted of first-degree murder in 2016.
Supplied court exhibit image of Mark Smich from the Dellen Millard and Mark Smich first-degree murder trial in the death of Laura Babcock from the proceedings on November 9, 2017 at the court house at 361 University Ave. in Toronto, Ont.
In a text exchange following the sale, Millard asked Ward-Jackson if the gun was “clean,” and later texted that by the time he would return the weapon, “she’ll be a dirty girl.”
“That’s fine lol,” Ward-Jackson responded. “I can change her print.”
Ward-Jackson was “well entrenched” in the illegal firearms business, concluded Kelly.
Millard bought one gun on July 2, 2012, the day before Laura Babcock disappeared. Earlier that year, Babcock became entangled in a feud with Millard’s girlfriend Christina Noudga after revealing she was sleeping with Millard.
Laura Babcock went missing in July 2012.
Millard sent a text to Noudga stating how he would deal with Babcock: “First I’m going to hurt her. Then I’ll make her leave. I will remove her from our lives.”
In December, 2017, Millard and Smich were convicted of first-degree murder in Babcock’s death and will be sentenced Feb. 12 — which would have been Babcock’s 29th birthday.
spazzano@postmedia.com
Millard’s gun dealer handed 11 years for peddling murder weapons | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#92
Dellen Millard retains lawyer for third murder trial
Kevin Connor
More from Kevin Connor
Published:
January 22, 2018
Updated:
January 22, 2018 1:24 PM EST
Dellen Millard Facebook
TORONTO — Twice-convicted killer Dellen Millard has decided to be represented by legal counsel in the murder trial of his father.
Last month, Millard was found guilty, along with co-accused Mark Smich, in the July 2012 first-degree murder of Toronto woman Laura Babcock, with whom he was involved in a love triangle. The pair will be sentenced Feb. 12. Crown prosecutor Jill Cameron has said she’ll be seeking consecutive parole ineligiblity periods, which would mean both murderers would serve at least 50 years before they could apply for parole.
Millard acted as his own lawyer in that trial.
He and Smich had previously been convicted in Hamilton in the May 2013 first-degree murder of Tim Bosma, an Ancaster man who was trying to sell a truck the pair wanted to steal.
Dellin Millard’s lawyer Ravin Pillay arrives at the Tim Bosma murder trial in Hamilton on February 3, 2016. Michael Peake/Toronto Sun/
On Monday, Millard made a court appearance for the coming trial in the shooting death Wayne Millard, which was initially deemed a suicide. He officially retained defence lawyer Ravin Pillay, who was co-counsel for Millard at the Bosma trial, to defend him in his third murder trial. It is slated to start on April 3 and last eight weeks.
During his brief appearance, Millard showed no emotion, though he knew when to stand and bowed at the appropriate times to the judge.
He had on blue jeans, black runners, a grey jacket and black rimmed glasses. He was also sporting a single braid on the right side of his head.
kconnor@postmedia.com
Dellen Millard retains lawyer for third murder trial | Toronto Sun
 
JLM
#93
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

Dellen Millard retains lawyer for third murder trial
Kevin Connor
More from Kevin Connor
Published:
January 22, 2018
Updated:
January 22, 2018 1:24 PM EST
Dellen Millard Facebook
TORONTO — Twice-convicted killer Dellen Millard has decided to be represented by legal counsel in the murder trial of his father.
Last month, Millard was found guilty, along with co-accused Mark Smich, in the July 2012 first-degree murder of Toronto woman Laura Babcock, with whom he was involved in a love triangle. The pair will be sentenced Feb. 12. Crown prosecutor Jill Cameron has said she’ll be seeking consecutive parole ineligiblity periods, which would mean both murderers would serve at least 50 years before they could apply for parole.
Millard acted as his own lawyer in that trial.
He and Smich had previously been convicted in Hamilton in the May 2013 first-degree murder of Tim Bosma, an Ancaster man who was trying to sell a truck the pair wanted to steal.
Dellin Millard’s lawyer Ravin Pillay arrives at the Tim Bosma murder trial in Hamilton on February 3, 2016. Michael Peake/Toronto Sun/
On Monday, Millard made a court appearance for the coming trial in the shooting death Wayne Millard, which was initially deemed a suicide. He officially retained defence lawyer Ravin Pillay, who was co-counsel for Millard at the Bosma trial, to defend him in his third murder trial. It is slated to start on April 3 and last eight weeks.
During his brief appearance, Millard showed no emotion, though he knew when to stand and bowed at the appropriate times to the judge.
He had on blue jeans, black runners, a grey jacket and black rimmed glasses. He was also sporting a single braid on the right side of his head.
kconnor@postmedia.com
Dellen Millard retains lawyer for third murder trial | Toronto Sun

I understand all the bull shit about no death penalty in Canada, but I really can't see any point in keeping that f**king Millard on the planet. He rates right up there with that Garland Asshole in Calgary. You don't rehabilitate guys like that- they are just plain evil!
 
spaminator
#94
MANDEL: Facebook defence fund for killer Dellen Millard?
Michele Mandel
More from Michele Mandel
Published:
February 2, 2018
Updated:
February 2, 2018 7:38 PM EST
This photo of twice convicted killer Dellen Millard was posted with an online fundraising campaign on Facebook that aims to raise money to help pay for his legal defence at his upcoming third murder trial.Facebook
It’s got to be a joke — and a bad one at that.
Dellen Millard, 32, is already twice convicted of murder: first for the slaying of Ancaster dad Tim Bosma and recently for the killing of his former Toronto girlfriend Laura Babcock.
He still faces a third murder trial in April on charges he killed his own father and made it look like suicide.
Millard was then set to inherit millions from his father’s aviation business.
Yet someone has actually started a Facebook fundraiser for the rich accused serial killer.
Called “Help raise money for Dellen Millard’s Defence,” the anonymous poster says they grew up with Millard — they’ve never known a “sweeter, more gentle person” — and there’s no way he killed his dad, Wayne Millard, in 2012.
“My dear friend Dellen Millard is being unjustly persecuted for the murder of his father, whom he loved dearly.” says the poster. “He has bravely withstood two unjust persecutions, one of which he had to endure alone, however his funds have run out.
“I make this page on his behalf, to hope that there are still good people out there, willing to see through the lies and realize the burdens this great man has (and continues to) endured through no fault of his own.”
It’s enough to make you lose your lunch.
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
The page has provoked outrage since its first posting on Jan. 26 and has garnered more than 1,500 signatures on an online petition calling on Facebook to shut it down.
“This is an insult to the families of the victims,” wrote Shelly Smith of Stratford in starting the crusade to have the page removed.
The reams of comments on both Facebook and change.org are rightly filled with anger and revulsion.
“Laura is my cousin and he is a murderer already guilty of two counts,” wrote Jamie Groote.
Added Brittany Hale, “I don’t agree with raising funds for a millionaire psychopath.”
Millard’s Facebook cheerleader has continued to come to his defence despite the wave of revulsion he’s unleashed.
“Some of the greatest men in history were greatly reviled and persecuted, until time showed otherwise,” they wrote. “Like Jesus of Nazareth and all the other saints and martyrs. Dellen’s time will come. We can only hope it’s sooner rather than later.”
Whoever’s behind this has a rather vile sense of humour. Whether it’s a hoax or not, one thing is certain: Millard doesn’t need to crowdfund to pay for a lawyer.
Millard had a legal team when he and co-killer Mark Smich were tried and convicted in 2016 of killing Bosma during a feigned truck test drive. Before the pair went on trial last fall for Babcock’s slaying, the aviation heir complained he couldn’t afford a lawyer this time and tried unsuccessfully to get Legal Aid.
Justice Michael Code (left to right), Mark Smich, Clayton Babcock and Dellen Millard are shown in this artist’s sketch at the first-degree murder trial of Millard and Smich in Toronto, Monday, Oct.23, 2017.
Justice Michael Code saw through his pleas of poverty. True, his inheritance was tied up while he faced murder charges but the judge insisted he apply to have some of the funds released so he could retain a lawyer. Last summer, he was granted access to $1 million of the $4.8 million in proceeds from the sale of the Millard Properties’ hangar in Waterloo.
Still, Millard stalled.
“Although his private resources were undoubtedly depleted to some extent in the Bosma trial in Hamilton, I am satisfied he remains a relatively wealthy individual who is able to retain counsel privately if that is his true wish,” wrote Code in a July pre-trial motion.
Instead, Millard decided to save his money and represent himself.
It didn’t go very well.
After the cocky Millard failed to convince the jury that he hadn’t murdered Babcock, he was convicted of first-degree murder for the second time. Crown attorney Jill Cameron is seeking a consecutive life term when sentencing is held Feb. 12 — and not one that runs concurrent to his life sentence with no parole for 25 years that he’s currently serving for Bosma’s murder.
Faced with living in a prison cell for the next half century, Millard suddenly found the money to hire one of his former lawyers, Ravin Pillay, for the sentencing hearing. He’s also retained him for his third murder trial.
Asked about the Facebook fundraiser, Pillay seemed genuinely shocked but had no comment.
So worry not for Millard’s defence fund.
As for the “good friend” soliciting on his behalf, our best bet is to save the outrage and ignore this troll.
mmandel@postmedia.com
http://facebook.com/pg/Help-raise-mo...18853378374089
http://change.org/p/facebook-have-fa...lard-s-defense
MANDEL: Facebook defence fund for killer Dellen Millard? | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#95
MANDEL: Throw away the key for double killers Dellen Millard and Mark Smich
Michele Mandel
More from Michele Mandel
Published:
February 8, 2018
Updated:
February 8, 2018 11:19 PM EST
Dellen Millard (left) and Mark Smich
There was a time, and not long ago, when murderers could get a volume discount for their crimes.
One first-degree murder conviction would net a life term with no parole for 25 years. Kill two or three or four and the penalty was the same. For a young multiple killer, possible freedom was only a quarter century away — no matter how many victims he’d amassed.
Thankfully, not anymore.
When double thrill killers Dellen Millard and Mark Smich appear Monday for a sentencing hearing for their murder of Laura Babcock — it would have been her 29th birthday that day — Crown attorney Jill Cameron will ask Justice Michael Code to impose a consecutive life term to the one the pair is already serving for the slaying of Tim Bosma.
If the judge agrees, as he should, Millard and Smich won’t be allowed to apply for parole for 50 years, instead of 25.
Their lawyers are expected to launch a constitutional challenge, arguing that having to serve back-on-back terms is “cruel and unusual punishment.” But that’s nothing compared to what these killers have done to the Bosma and Babcock families.
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
In 2011, the Harper government passed the Protecting Canadians by Ending Sentence Discounts for Multiple Murders Act. It’s not exactly a catchy title, but it promised no more free rides for murderers who went on a killing spree. The Criminal Code amendment allows judges the discretion to impose separate, 25-year periods of parole ineligibility for each additional victim — to be served consecutively and not simultaneously with the first — if justified by the “character of the offender, the nature of the offence and the circumstances surrounding its commission.”
Killers could no longer add to their tally for free; additional victims were no longer to be devalued and lumped in. We would hopefully see no more Clifford Olsons: the late serial killer murdered 11, yet served 11 simultaneous life sentences. It’s not that there was ever a chance that he would really be released after 25 years but the families of his victims still had to endure Olson’s bids for parole.
Justin Bourque was one of the first multiple killers to be sentenced under the new law. In 2014, a New Brunswick judge gave the 24-year-old life in prison with no chance of parole for 75 years for killing three RCMP officers — the longest sentence in Canadian history and the harshest since the death penalty was abolished.
Two Alberta judges followed suit last year: Triple murderer Douglas Garland was sentenced to life without parole for 75 years for the deaths of a Calgary couple and their five-year-old grandson last February and in August, Derek Saretzky was given the same sentence for killing a toddler, her father and a senior.
In Ontario, the first sentencing under the new law came in 2015, when Eaton Centre shooter Christopher Husbands was handed two consecutive life terms for second-degree murder, with no parole for 15 years on each. Husbands’ lawyer argued the new consecutive sentence provision was unconstitutional because it creates a “degrading loss of hope of release which is both cruel and unusual” and is an “affront to human dignity.”
Supplied court exhibit image of Mark Smich
It’s the same argument that could be used in the Millard and Smich hearing.
In the Husbands’ case, now-retired Superior Court Justice Eugene Ewaschuk dismissed his Charter application, ruling judges still have the discretion to craft fair sentences under the law. Hopefully, Code will find the same.
Any precedent set by Husbands’ 30-year parole ineligibility, the longest in Ontario history, was undone last summer when the appeal court ordered a new trial due to the judge’s error during jury selection.
Dellen Millard
For Millard and Smich, consecutive terms is the only just sentence for their cold-blooded murder and incineration of two innocent people — one a young father, the other a former friend. Why should they get a free pass for killing Babcock because they are already serving a life term for Bosma? How can her life be worth nothing in this horrific equation?
The evil duo should have to spend five decades behind bars before they even think about requesting release. Let them be old men in their 80s with their lives firmly behind them.
And if Millard is convicted of a third first-degree murder — he goes on trial in April on charges he killed his father — prison will be where he lives. And where he dies.
MANDEL: Throw away the key for double killers Dellen Millard and Mark Smich | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#96
Lock up thrill killers Dellen Millard and Mark Smich for at least 50 years: Crown
Sam Pazzano Courts Bureau
More from Sam Pazzano Courts Bureau
Published:
February 12, 2018
Updated:
February 12, 2018 8:50 PM EST
Dellen Millard (top right) and Mark Smich (bottom right) have been found guilty of first-degree murder in the death of Laura Babcock (left).
Aviation heir Dellen Millard and Mark Smich are thrill killers who deserve to spend 50 years in jail before they get a crack at parole, a Crown attorney told a packed courtroom Monday.
Millard and Smich are “selfish predators who delighted in murdering innocent people — Tim Bosma and Laura Babcock,” Crown attorney Jill Cameron told Justice Michael Code at the sentencing hearing for the first-degree murder of Babcock, 23, in July 2012.
Millard, 32, of Toronto, and Smich, 30, of Oakville, were first convicted in 2016 of first-degree murder in the May 2013 killing of Bosma and are already serving life sentences with no chance of parole for 25 years — until 2038. Both Bosma’s and Babcock’s remains were burned in the same animal incinerator — called The Eliminator.
Dellen Millard (left) and Mark Smich
A first degree murder conviction carries an automatic sentence of life with no parole for 25 years.
The Crown wants the sentence for Babcock’s murder to be consecutive to the time they are already serving. If granted, that means the murderous duo would have to spend 50 years in prison before they could apply for parole.
“They killed Ms. Babcock and Mr. Bosma for the thrill they needed,” said Cameron. If the court doesn’t impose the 50 years, insisted Cameron, they will remain unpunished for the second planned and deliberate murder.
Tim Bosma holds his daughter. The 32-year-old went missing from his Ancaster home after two men came to test drive his truck that was up for sale on May 6, 2013.
“They shouldn’t get a discount for the murder of Ms. Babcock. They shouldn’t get to do it again for free,” said Cameron.
“Anything but consecutive sentences would defy justice and would outrage our community.These tragic crimes defy explanation,” said Cameron.
Laura Babcock screenshot of video released in the trial of Dellen Millard and Mark Smich.
A jury concluded that Millard and Smich murdered Babcock because she became the odd woman out in a love triangle with Millard and his jealous girlfriend, Christina Noudga, in 2012.
She moved out of her parents’ home, was couch-surfing at friends’ homes. She asked Millard to stay at his home in early July 2012.
Millard bought the Eliminator just days before Babcock vanished in early July. Babcock’s body was burned in late July, the jury heard.
Millard’s lawyer, Ravin Pillay, argued against the consecutive sentences, saying it was “unduly harsh and unneccessary.
“There’s no telling when he’d be released on parole, maybe never,” said Pillay.
Smich’s lawyer, Tom Dungey also opposed the consecutive sentences, saying his client was manipulated by a “big brother type” in Millard, who ochestrated both planned executions.
Smich finished his Grade 12 education behind bars and has a responsible position as a food server in jail, added Dungey.
Code will pass judgment on Feb. 26.
Family learned to hate after Laura Babcock was killed, sentencing hearing told
The Babcock family should have been celebrating Laura Babcock’s 29th birthday on Monday, watching her dance and flash a dazzling smile.
Instead, parents Linda and Clayton Babcock and their son, Brent, vented anger and hatred at killers Dellen Millard and Mark Smich at a sentencing hearing in a Toronto courtroom.
“We have agonized over our loss for 2,050 days,” said Crown attorney Jill Cameron in reading the family’s joint victim impact statement Monday.
It was so poignant and eloquent that Cameron paused as emotions overcame her briefly.
Clayton Babcock, Laura Babcock’s father, stands next to his wife, Linda, outside a downtown courthouse. (JACK BOLAND, Toronto Sun)
“We hate you for taking Laura’s life away from her,” the family wrote. “She should be laughing, dancing and enjoying life.
“We always taught our children not to use the word ‘hate.’ It is too horrible and destructive, but you men have made us hate,” said the Babcocks’ victim impact statement. “We’ve learned to hate.”
Laura Babcock could “light up a room with her infectious smile or her laugh,” added her aunt, Cathy Babcock, who read a statement.
Babcock, who has no children of her own, treated Laura “like her own daughter,” saying she took any opportunity to spoil her niece.
“People who Laura thought were her friends took her life for ‘the thrill of it.’ Horrific events, such as Laura’s murder, only happen on TV, not in real life, not in our family,” stated Babcock.
Lock up thrill killers Dellen Millard and Mark Smich for at least 50 years: Crown | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#97
Double murderers lauded by family and — in one case — a cellmate
Sam Pazzano Courts Bureau
More from Sam Pazzano Courts Bureau
Published:
February 13, 2018
Updated:
February 13, 2018 8:39 PM EST
Dellen Millard (left) and Mark Smich
Double murderer Dellen Millard was the world’s youngest flyer when he was licensed at the age of 14.
Millard’s mom, Madeleine Burns, revealed her only child was precocious, reading “globally by age 2, doing instant math and skiing in Lake Placid alone at age 5.”
At age 14, Mark Smich was getting high on grass and crashing at school because he had learning disorders, both reading comprehension and ADHD, which went undiagnosed.
Smich grew up in an immigrant family with a single but hard-working mom. His family says he has blossomed in jail, finishing Grade 12.
The untold stories of both men — now each twice-convicted of first-degree murder — were revealed in character reference letters filed by their families at the Laura Babcock murder sentencing.
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
Millard and Smich will be sentenced for the murder of Laura Babcock on Feb. 26. The duo are already serving sentences of life with no parole for 25 years for killing Ancaster father Tim Bosma in May, 2013.
Millard’s cellmate, Achint Ranhotra, who will be sentenced April 16 for second degree murder, also praised Millard and shares something in common with him: He is also facing a life sentence for murdering girlfriend Vilanong Douangphachanh, 26. Ranhotra and Millard were in their respective sentencing hearings in the same Toronto courthouse on Monday.
“Dellen’s perseverance and determination to keep going with his fight with the Canadian justice system has given me some hope,” wrote Ranhotra, 32, who shot his live-in girlfriend in the head.
“Death is inevitable but as Dellen says, ‘Why invite it early and not live it out to see what it has to offer,’” wrote Ranhotra, a former Rogers IT employee,.
“I am a friend of Dellen’s and the outcome of that has been very good. He has been my personal friend since 2016,” wrote Ranhotra.
“We have all made decisions in our life that we regret and some that are unforgivable … I had nothing to lose but to give a fair chance to him to live up to certain expectation of a decent human being in jail. It’s a decision I don’t regret to this day,” wrote Ranhotra.
When sentencing Millard and Smich, Justice Michael Code will decide whether they must wait either 25 or 50 years before getting a first crack at parole.
“We are all very well aware of the fact that we are doing to die in jail. However the number (for a first chance at parole) represents a tiny glimpse of hope that someday this would all be over, but will it?” wrote Ranhotra.
spazzano@postmedia.com
Double murderers lauded by family and
 
spaminator
#98
Killers Millard and Smich to serve at least 50 years in jail
Sam Pazzano Courts Bureau
More from Sam Pazzano Courts Bureau
Published:
February 26, 2018
Updated:
February 26, 2018 7:01 PM EST
Dellen Millard (top right) and Mark Smich (bottom right) have been found guilty of first-degree murder in the death of Laura Babcock (left).
A courtroom erupted in applause and cheering after a judge ordered double killers Dellen Millard and Mark Smich to serve 50 years before they can apply for parole.
A jury found Dellen Millard, 32, and Mark Smich, 30, guilty of first-degree murder in the July 2012 death of Laura Babcock in December and Justice Michael Code passed consecutive parole ineligibility periods — totalling 50 years — on Monday. The duo were already serviing a life sentence — with no parole for 25 years — following a 2016 conviction for murdering Tim Bosma, near Hamilton, in 2013.
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
“If there was ever a reason for punishment to the full extent of the law, this was it,” said Laura Babcock’s father, Clayton, who added “justice has been served.”
“We’re saddened that the trial is over because it kept Laura in the forefront. But she’ll always be cherished by us,” said Babcock, flanked by his family, Crown attorneys and police. “Six years have passed and the pain is as great as ever.”
During the prolonged cheering and hugging by the family and friends of Babcock and Bosma, Millard appeared glassy eyed and upset by the boisterous celebrations, while Smich asked for a Kleenex.
First-degree murder carries a mandatory sentence of life in prison with no parole for 25 years.
Code decided Monday that the parole eligibility of 25 years for the Babcock murder would be consecutive to the one imposed on Millard and Smich for Bosma’s killing.
“This repetition of two planned and deliberate murders also arguably requires separate punishment … to deter potential serial murderers (from second homicides),” said the judge.
Millard unsuccessfully attempted to show there was a good side to his personality and his eventual rehabilitation would be aided by a concurrent sentence, said Code.
Dellen Millard (left) and Mark Smich
“The overwhelming weight of evidence … is that he’s profoundly amoral and dangerous,” he added.
While Smich lacked the “advantage of Millard’s privileged upbringing,” he had a loving supportive mother and two older sisters, said Code.
Millard wanted to kill Babcock partly because she was an irritant in his relationship with girlfriend Christina Noudga. Smich was motivated by a desire to “adopt a gangster persona” and join Millard’s criminal conspiracy, said Code.
The photographing of the incineration of Babcock’s remains and Smich’s “boastful” celebration of the murder — by composing and performing a rap song for friends — were aggravating factors, the judge determined.
spazzano@postmedia.com
Killers Millard and Smich to serve at least 50 years in jail | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#99
MANDEL: Should we prosecute killer Dellen Millard for third time?
Michele Mandel
More from Michele Mandel
Published:
March 6, 2018
Updated:
March 6, 2018 10:06 PM EST
Dellen Millard is pictured in a police photo.
Dellen Millard is already a twice-convicted murderer serving two consecutive life terms in prison for killing Laura Babcock and Tim Bosma. Chances are good the cold-blooded killer will never walk our streets again, even in his old age.
For the once-spoiled aviation heir, there will be no more helicopter flights or jeep races across the desert or chartered yachts on the Mediterranean. But there is one hobby that still remains: his stage at the downtown courthouse.
In May, Millard goes on trial again — this time for allegedly killing his father, Wayne. The question is why?
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
In this time of overcrowded courts and sparse resources, of Charter applications that can see cases tossed for unreasonable delay, should we really be tying up the justice system to prosecute Millard yet again when another possible guilty verdict will change little? And do we really want to give this sick narcissist more attention?
Or are we obligated to hold him publicly accountable for one of the most heinous accusations one can face: murdering your own father? His late dad surely deserves justice as well.
We just might not have the luxury to do so. Last week, a multi-million dollar fraud case was put in jeopardy when Justice John McMahon regretfully acknowledged that he doesn’t have a Superior Court judge available for the three-month trial until next January — five years after the charges were first laid and well after the limits set by the Supreme Court.
The frustrated Crown attorney suggested room might have opened on the docket after a planned four-week trial had just fallen through in Justice Maureen Forestell’s court. McMahon reminded the prosecutor that Forestell is next set to preside on a case “by the name of Mr. Millard.
“I don’t think I could free her up unless the Crown will stay the charge against Mr. Millard,” the judge said, “and I don’t think they want to do that.”
Apparently not. But should they?
On Nov. 29, 2012, at about 7:25 p.m., Toronto Police responded to a sudden death call at the Millard family home at 5 Maple Gate Court in Etobicoke. On arrival, they found 71-year-old Wayne Millard in his bed, dead from a single gunshot wound to his left eye. Next to him, officers found a .32-calibre Smith & Wesson revolver.
Initially, the police concluded his death was a suicide. The case was closed.
Dellen Millard
Five months later, when his son was under investigation for Bosma’s death, the investigation was reopened. After further examination of the Smith & Wesson allegedly revealed Dellen Millard’s DNA on its handle, he was charged with the first-degree murder of his father.
Two separate juries have already convicted him of two other heinous slayings. Along with pal Mark Smich, he murdered Babcock, his former girlfriend, in July 2012, burning her remains in the animal incinerator on his farm. The following May, the pair thrill-killed Bosma, a Hamilton father, during a test drive of his truck and cremated his body in The Eliminator as well.
For this third murder charge, Millard, 32, is accused of acting alone. His trial, originally scheduled for April 3, has been pushed back to May 31 to give his lawyer, Ravin Pillay, more time to prepare after Millard decided to retain him rather than going it alone again, as he did in the Babcock trial. He also asked to be tried by a judge alone — which should shorten the timeline.
Still, even if it is just four weeks of court time — is it necessary?
For someone who relishes the limelight and the notoriety of being an accused serial killer, aren’t we just playing into his hands by holding a third trial?
Or is the Crown right to hedge their bets. As unlikely as it seems, there are no iron clad guarantees that Millard wouldn’t be able to successfully appeal his previous convictions. This third trial could be a necessary insurance policy to ensure this monster remains behind bars — even if it means having to stomach his repugnant performance once more time in the downtown courthouse.
mmandel@postmedia.com
MANDEL: Should we prosecute killer Dellen Millard for third time? | Toronto Sun

'GETS A FAIR TRIAL': Dellen Millard granted judge-alone trial for dad’s alleged murder
Sam Pazzano Courts Bureau
More from Sam Pazzano Courts Bureau
Published:
March 6, 2018
Updated:
March 6, 2018 1:41 PM EST
Dellen Millard is pictured in a police photo.
TORONTO — In a surprise move, double convicted killer Dellen Millard will be tried for the first-degree murder of his father Wayne Millard at a judge-alone trial.
Millard, 32, who is already serving a life sentence with no chance of parole for another 45 years, will stand trial before Justice Maureen Forestell of Ontario Superior Court of Justice on May 31.
He was arraigned in his father’s murder before Justice John McMahon so that the accused could officially choose — with the Crown’s consent — to be tried by judge alone. Almost all murder trials are tried by judge and jury.
“In light of the notoriety from other trials and the difficulty getting a jury, this will ensure he gets a fair trial,” McMahon said Tuesday.
The change from a judge-and-jury requires the consent of either the province’s attorney general or his designate, Andrew Locke, director of Crown operations for Toronto. Locke consented to the rare move.
Killers Millard and Smich to serve at least 50 years in jail
Double murderers lauded by family and — in one case — a cellmate
MANDEL: Throw away the key for double killers Dellen Millard and Mark Smich
Wayne Millard, 71, died of a single gunshot wound to the eye in a Nov. 29, 2012, death that Toronto Police initially deemed a suicide.
The trial, expected to last four weeks, was to begin in April. But Millard and his newly retained lawyer, Ravin Pillay, requested a later date to give Pillay time to prepare.
In December, a jury found Millard and Mark Smich, 30, guilty of first-degree murder in the July 2012 death of Laura Babcock. The duo, who have so far spent five years in custody, were already serving a life sentence following a 2016 conviction for murdering married Ancaster father Tim Bosma in 2013.
Last week, Justice Michael Code ruled that the parole eligibility of 25 years for the Babcock murder would be consecutive to the 25-year one imposed on Millard and Smich for Bosma’s killing — totalling 50 years.
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
“This repetition of two planned and deliberate murders also arguably requires separate punishment … to deter potential serial murderers (from second homicides),” Code said.
Millard unsuccessfully attempted to show there was a good side to his personality and his eventual rehabilitation would be aided by a concurrent sentence, the judge noted.
“The overwhelming weight of evidence … is that he’s profoundly amoral and dangerous,” he added.
Code said Millard wanted to kill Babcock partly because she was an irritant in his relationship with girlfriend Christina Noudga. Smich was motivated by a desire to “adopt a gangster persona” and join Millard’s criminal conspiracy, the judge noted.
After the death of his father in November 2012, Millard inherited a multimillion-dollar aviation business — Millardair — that was initially launched by Millard’s grandfather, Carl Millard, in the 1960s.
Millard, who represented himself at the Babcock trial, had initially said he was going to represent himself for his father’s case. But he changed his mind in January and retained Pillay, who represented him during the Bosma murder trial.
— With files from Canadian Press
spazzano@postmedia.com
‘GETS A FAIR TRIAL’: Dellen Millard granted judge-alone trial for dad
 
spaminator
#100
Mark Smich appeals Babcock first-degree murder conviction
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
March 15, 2018
Updated:
March 15, 2018 8:45 AM EDT
Dellen Millard (left) and Mark Smich
TORONTO — An Ontario man found guilty of killing a young Toronto woman who vanished five years ago is appealing his first-degree murder conviction and sentence, saying the verdict was unreasonable and the sentence too harsh.
Mark Smich, 30, of Oakville, and his friend Dellen Millard, 32, of Toronto, were found guilty in December of murdering Laura Babcock, with a judge ruling last month that the pair would not be eligible for parole for 50 years.
The 23-year-old Babcock disappeared in 2012 and her body has not been found. The pair’s trial heard Millard and Smich burned her body in an animal incinerator days after she went missing.
Laura Babcock screenshot of video released in the trial of Dellen Millard, 32, of Toronto, and Mark Smich, 30 of Oakville.
Millard and Smich have also been convicted of killing Tim Bosma — a Hamilton man who went missing in May 2013 after going with the pair for a test drive of a truck he was trying to sell online.
The judge in the Babcock trial ordered life sentences in the two murder cases to be served consecutively, leading to the 50 year parole ineligibility period.
Smich’s grounds for appeal, written in four bullet points, all in capital letters, reads: the “verdict was unreasonable; misapprehension of the evidence; errors of law;” and “consecutive sentence too harsh.”
Babcock’s mother scoffed at Smich’s reasons.
“The appeal is expected,” Linda Babcock told The Canadian Press. “I don’t think he’s going to get very far.”
Clayton Babcock (right) and Linda Babcock read a statement outside a Toronto courthouse on Monday, February 26, 2018, after a sentencing hearing for Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, who were convicted of the first degree murder of their daughter Laura Babcock. (Chris Young/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
Appeal Court documents show Smich filed his inmate notice of appeal on Feb. 27, one day after a courtroom erupted into cheers and a standing ovation as he and Millard were sentenced for Babcock’s murder.
At a sentencing hearing, the Crown said the pair’s true motive for Babcock’s death was to satisfy an urge to kill.
During sentencing, Justice Michael Code said “Smich was enthusiastically involved in the murder of Laura Babcock.”
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
He said Smich’s motivation to commit both Babcock’s and Bosma’s murders “is tied up with his apparently determined efforts to adopt a gangster persona and with his adherence to a broader general criminal conspiracy with Millard.”
Millard has not yet filed an appeal in the case, but his lawyer, Ravin Pillay, said his client will appeal both the conviction and the sentencing decision.
Both Millard and Smich are also appealing their convictions for the murder of Bosma.
Millard alone is set to face another first-degree murder trial in late May for the death of his father, aviation heir Wayne Millard. Police initially deemed his death a suicide in November 2012. That trial will be heard by a judge alone.
Mark Smich appeals Babcock first-degree murder conviction | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#101
MANDEL: Double murderer Dellen Millard files appeal, claims he was forced to represent himself
Michele Mandel
More from Michele Mandel
Published:
March 28, 2018
Updated:
March 28, 2018 8:19 PM EDT
Dellen Millard Facebook
Double murderer Dellen Millard is appealing his second murder conviction and the consecutive life sentence that prevents him from seeking parole for 50 years.
From his current home at the Toronto East detention centre where he’s awaiting his third murder trial — this time accused of killing his father — Millard has filed his inmate notice of appeal to his first-degree murder conviction in the death of former girlfriend Laura Babcock, insisting the verdict is unreasonable and the punishment “unduly harsh and also unconstitutional.”
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
But the real kicker is this: The millionaire aviation heir has the nerve to blame Justice Michael Code for his poor decision to play lawyer at the Babcock trial.
“The learned trial judge erred in denying me the right to counsel and forcing me to represent myself,” Millard wrote in neat printing.
Yet he can’t help himself from still using his new legalese, stating his appeal will include “other injudicious errors, which the record will reveal, and I shall further advise.”
Millard, 32, and best pal Mark Smich, 30, were convicted in December of murdering Babcock and burning her body in an animal incinerator in July 2012. Already serving life for the 2013 thrill-kill and cremation of Tim Bosma, the pair was sentenced to a consecutive life sentence for Babcock’s slaying, making them ineligible for parole for 50 years.
Smich filed his inmate notice of appeal Feb. 27, the day after the downtown courtroom erupted in cheers at their sentencing. Millard didn’t file his until March 23, right under the 30-day appeal deadline.
There was no doubt he’d appeal. What’s outrageous is Millard’s accusation that it was Code’s fault he went it alone at trial. In reality, the judge repeatedly urged him to hire a lawyer. It was the cocky killer who ignored that advice.
The heir to millions from his father’s aviation company, Millard claimed he couldn’t access the funds. Legal Aid turned him down. His trial date was continually postponed to give him more time to free up money to retain a lawyer. Last July, he was granted access to $1 million from the $4.8 million sale of the Millard Properties’ Waterloo hangar.
Dellen Millard
Still, he stalled about hiring a lawyer. Code refused another adjournment.
“Although his private resources were undoubtedly depleted to some extent in the Bosma trial in Hamilton, I am satisfied he remains a relatively wealthy individual who is able to retain counsel privately if that is his true wish,” wrote Code in a pre-trial ruling.
The arrogant Millard decided he’d represent himself. Throughout the trial, though, he whined about how his incarceration interfered with his ability to prepare for court. An exceedingly patient Code accommodated his many requests, ensuring Millard had speedy transportation back to jail to prepare for the next day’s witness and even scheduling long weekends during the trial.
That didn’t stop Millard’s constant griping until even the ever-patient judge lost his temper. “You’re self-represented by your own choice,” Code sternly reminded him. “You could have had a team of lawyers.”
And now Millard dares to blame his egotistical folly on the judge who tried to save him from himself.
mmandel@postmedia.com
MANDEL: Double murderer Dellen Millard files appeal, claims he was forced to represent himself | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#102
MANDEL: Convicted killer Dellen Millard goes on trial for third time
Michele Mandel
More from Michele Mandel
Published:
May 29, 2018
Updated:
May 29, 2018 8:44 PM EDT
Dellen Millard Facebook
This time, charged with patricide, convicted murderer Dellen Millard stands alone.
On Thursday, the notorious thrill killer who murdered friend Laura Babcock and stranger Tim Bosma goes on trial for the third time — now accused of shooting his own father and making it look like a suicide. But unlike Millard’s other two trials, wingman Mark Smich is not charged, as well.
Instead, only Millard is accused of this heinous crime.
In the evening of Nov. 29, 2012, aviation scion Wayne Millard, 71, was found dead in his bed at 5 Maple Gate Crt.ourt in Etobicoke. The cause of death was a gunshot wound that entered his left eye and lodged in his brain. A .32-calibre Smith & Wesson revolver was found on the floor beside the bed.
According to court documents filed in advance of the judge-alone trial, that gun was purchased by his son in July 2012 and his DNA was allegedly on its handle.
Millard told Toronto Police that he last saw his father the day before his death and spent the night at Smich’s Oakville home. At about 6:30 p.m. on Nov. 29, he’d come home to get a sweater and when he entered his father’s bedroom, saw blood and called his mother. She came over and they called 911.
Asked if his father had guns, Millard told officers his dad used to have a few pistols but gave them away to a friend a few years earlier.
The case was quickly ruled a suicide.
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
“He was a good man in a careless world. He was my father,” Millard had written in his rather odd obituary. “Many who knew Wayne Millard, knew him as a pilot. Rightfully so, as he defined himself by the responsibilities of the trade. I now carry his pilot’s license in my wallet. It’s a good photo.”
Six months later, Hamilton Police charged Millard with the senseless killing of Bosma, an Ancaster father who had gone with Millard and Smich on a test drive of his pick-up truck– but never returned. Remains of Bosma’s badly-burned body had been found in an animal incinerator on Millard’s farm.
That murder probe led Toronto homicide to reopen the Wayne Millard case. When further examination allegedly found Millard’s DNA on the gun, he was charged with the first-degree murder of his father. Renewed investigation into his ties to his missing friend also led police to charge him, along with Smich, with killing Babcock.
Following two sensational jury trials, Smich and Millard are currently serving two consecutive life sentences for the murders of Babcock and Bosma. Both have filed appeals.
Dellen Millard (left) and Mark Smich
Now Millard must answer to accusations he has killed a third time.
The Crown will argue Millard’s father wasn’t suicidal — the head of MillardAir had recently finished building a 55,000-square-foot hangar at Waterloo Regional Airport and had just won his long-sought Transport Canada licence to run a Maintenance Repair Overhaul (“MRO”) operation for large aircraft. According to court filings, Wayne Millard told his employees he’d created the business “for Dellen Millard to carry on the legacy of MillardAir.”
But as two juries have heard, his playboy heir was too busy going on heists or amassing a collection of hot rods to work at the family business.
Wayne Millard also had a new romance in his life that makes suicide unlikely, prosecutors Jill Cameron and Ken Lockhart will contend.
Long divorced from Millard’s mother, he’d recently begun a relationship with Janet Campbell. They’d been discussing plans for her upcoming birthday and the day before he died, he told her that he wanted to move some of his clothes into her house.
According to court documents, Campbell is also expected to testify she spent hours talking to him through the night of Nov. 28 and until about 3 a.m. on Nov. 29, 2012 — “basically right up until his death.”
The trial is expected to last four weeks. After his unsuccessful attempt at defending himself at the Babcock trial, Millard is being represented by lawyer Ravin Pillay.
mmandel@postmedia.com
MANDEL: Convicted killer Dellen Millard goes on trial for third time | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#103
MANDEL: Dellen Millard doesn't flinch at photos of dead dad
Michele Mandel
More from Michele Mandel
Published:
May 31, 2018
Updated:
May 31, 2018 8:04 PM EDT
In this artist's sketch, Dellen Millard (left) appears in court in Toronto on May 31, 2018 for his judge-only trial for the murder of his father, Wayne Millard. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)
Save for the gruesome blood and the blackened skin, Wayne Millard looks like he is sleeping.
Dellen Millard’s father lies on his left side in an undershirt and underwear — a dried river of dark red running from his left eye, along his orange pillow and down the white sheet to the floor. His right arm is bent and his hand is tucked under his left cheek.
A sleeping repose that seems strangely peaceful.
Black gunshot residue is on the pillow. On the floor is a Lululemon shopping bag, a wood-handled .32-calibre, six-shot revolver carefully lies on top with what the Crown will argue is Dellen Millard’s DNA allegedly on the handle.
His son steals furtive peeks at the graphic police forensic photos of his dead father and then continues diligently taking his notes, not a glimmer of emotion crossing those cold, cold eyes. But then there’s no jury to play to in this judge-alone trial.
Dellen Millard is pictured in a police photo.
Perhaps we have the laser vision of hindsight, but how did his father’s death not look suspicious? Did the aviation executive shoot himself in the left eye, carefully put the gun down on the floor and then tuck himself into a virtual fetal position?
Yet a coroner would deem it a suicide. Case closed — until his playboy heir was charged with murdering stranger Tim Bosma in May 2013 and authorities wondered whether he had killed before and made it look like a suicide.
Now Millard, 32, is facing murder charges for the third time, still sporting the small braid behind his right ear, some kind of Aboriginal pouch around his neck and looking unfortunately unscathed despite serving two consecutive life terms for killing Bosma and Laura Babcock.
The alleged murder weapon at the trial of Dellen Millard, who is accused of killing his father. (Court supplied photo)
“Not guilty,” he pleaded on a charge of first-degree murder in the death of his father on Nov. 29, 2012.
When paramedic William Smith arrived at 5 Maple Gate Crt. at 7 p.m., he said the man’s son told him he’d tried to get hold of his father for a few days before finding him dead in bed. The elder Millard was cold to the touch and skin was dark. “He was beyond assistance,” he said.
Janet Campbell had last spoken to him about 15 hours earlier. First cousins through adoption, the pair had rekindled their friendship in 2012 and by November, they were dating and he’d spent the night at her home.
She described the elder Millard as a recluse — “he wasn’t a social animal” — whose passion was flying. “He was a pilot and he loved it,” she recalled with a smile.
He’d inherited MillardAir from his father, Carl, and told her he and his son were transforming the business into a Maintenance Repair Overhaul (“MRO”) operation to service large aircraft. They packed a lunch and he showed her around his new 55,000-square-foot hangar at Waterloo Regional Airport. “He was quite proud of that, actually.”
He was also smitten. “He said he loved me, that he adored me.”
The Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. (Court supplied image)
He’d already made plans for her birthday on Dec. 4: Clearing his calendar, buying a card and purchasing a gift he warned she might not like initially but would eventually love. After his death, Dellen Millard gave her the present his dad had chosen for her: A series of flying lessons.
“He was much more excited for my birthday than I was,” she recalled.
Despite defence lawyer Ravin Pillay’s attempts to suggest Wayne Millard suffered from depression, Campbell painted a portrait of a man who suddenly had a lot to live for: A new relationship, plans to explore their family roots together and a company that had just been awarded the Transport Canada licence it needed.
They’d spend hours talking on the phone and chatted until about 3 a.m. on the day of his death. While he had a drinking problem, she didn’t hear him slur his words that night.
“Was he upset or anxious?” asked assistant Crown attorney Jill Cameron.
“No, not to the best of my knowledge,” Campbell replied. “He wasn’t a sad person.”
When she couldn’t reach him the next day, she became increasingly worried. His son finally replied to her frantic e-mails. “He said, ‘My father is dead, and it would appear by his own hand.’”
“I was stunned. I was totally, absolutely stunned.”
The trial continues.
mmandel@postmedia.com
MANDEL: Dellen Millard doesn’t flinch at photos of dead dad | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#104
MANDEL: Dellen Millard allegedly emotionless after discovering dead father in bedroom
Michele Mandel
More from Michele Mandel
Published:
June 1, 2018
Updated:
June 1, 2018 9:29 PM EDT
Dellen Millard Facebook
When Toronto Police Sgt. Richard Nimmo responded to a “sudden death” call at the large Etobicoke home of aviation executive Wayne Millard six years ago, he found the dead man’s ex-wife sobbing and visibly distraught.
And the man’s only child, Dellen Millard?
“I don’t recall him having any overt emotional reaction,” Nimmo told his murder trial before Superior Court Justice Maureen Forestell.
In this artist’s sketch, Dellen Millard (left) appears in court in Toronto on May 31, 2018 for his judge-only trial for the murder of his father, Wayne Millard. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)
Nor did his demeanour change during their several interactions that evening. “I recollect he wasn’t showing any overt signs of emotion like his mother.”
Two years after it was initially ruled a suicide, Millard, 32, would be arrested for murder in the death of his 71-year-old father. The aviation heir — along with buddy Mark Smich — is already serving two consecutive life terms for the murders of former lover Laura Babcock and stranger Tim Bosma.
He’s now one conviction away from being considered a serial killer.
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
But there was much that was Keystone Kops about this investigation that may help his case.
Nimmo agreed with defence lawyer Ravin Pillay that in his notes on that November evening he’d written “nothing appeared suspicious.”
Seriously?
Nimmo had been taken into the bedroom by a paramedic and saw Wayne Millard lying on his left side, his right hand tucked under his left cheek, blood on his face and hands as well as staining his pillow and sheets. He was told the amount of blood wasn’t uncommon for an alcoholic — as he’d been described by his ex-wife.
The veteran sergeant saw no sign of a firearm or a gunshot wound.
It would be the coroner, arriving a full hour later, who actually discovered the revolver in or on – it wasn’t clear which – a black Lululemon bag that was wedged between the mattress and the dresser. And it was Dr. David Evans who alerted them to the bullet wound to Millard’s left eye.
Supplied evidence photos from Toronto Police at the Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. In the bag, beside the bed is gun.
Nimmo had left the room at that point and Const. Doug Leonard testified he was with the coroner when he picked up the bag and showed it to him.
“He pulled it out and said there’s a gun,” Leonard recalled.
“Did you touch the firearm?” asked assistant Crown attorney Ken Lockhart.
“I don’t recall,” the officer replied.
Nimmo said he was called back in by Leonard and told the coroner had located the wooden-handled revolver as well as discovered Millard had been shot.
“This was new information,” he noted.
The gun used in Wayne Millard’s death is shown at the murder trial of Dellen Millard. (Court supplied photo)
When asked to look at police identification photos later taken of the gun beside the bed, he told the court that it appeared to have been moved further out from where he had seen it wedged.
“I don’t recall seeing it out like it is in the photo,” he said.
So much for not disturbing evidence — something Nimmo testified is basic to any police investigation.
“I don’t have to tell that to any other officers. That’s their training,” he explained. “Nobody was picking it up and waving it around.”
It also didn’t seem strange to any of the officers that the elder Millard had somehow suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound to his left eye while curled up and resting on his hand? Yet the police were looking for a suicide note and quickly discounting any possibility of foul play.
Not even when the dead man’s son seemed strangely unperturbed at learning they’d found a gun by his dead father’s bedside despite telling officers his dad had given away his registered firearms to a friend several years before.
Dellen Millard (left) and Mark Smich
“He said, ‘Is it a revolver?’” Nimmo recalled. “He didn’t seem surprised or any other emotion regarding that statement.”
The Crown will argue that he knew very well it was a revolver — he’d purchased it several months before. And it was his DNA allegedly on its handle.
No one knew that at the time, of course. Though no one seemed to do much of an investigation to find out.
“You didn’t believe anyone had committed a criminal offence?” asked Millard’s lawyer.
“I had no reason to believe that, no,” the sergeant replied.
The trial continues.
mmandel@postmedia.com
MANDEL: Dellen Millard allegedly emotionless after discovering dead father in bedroom | Toronto Sun

MANDEL: Dellen Millard's dad recluse but not 'sad person,' girlfriend tells trial
Michele Mandel
More from Michele Mandel
Published:
June 1, 2018
Updated:
June 1, 2018 8:16 AM EDT
Dellen Millard is pictured in a police photo.
Save for the gruesome blood and the blackened skin, Wayne Millard looks like he is sleeping.
Dellen Millard’s father lies on his left side in an undershirt and underwear — a dried river of dark red running from his left eye, along his orange pillow and down the white sheet to the floor. His right arm is bent and his hand is tucked under his left cheek.
A sleeping repose that seems strangely peaceful.
Black gunshot residue is on the pillow. On the floor is a Lululemon shopping bag, a wood-handled .32-calibre, six-shot revolver carefully lies on top with what the Crown will argue is Dellen Millard’s DNA allegedly on the handle.
His son steals furtive peeks at the graphic police forensic photos of his dead father and then continues diligently taking his notes, not a glimmer of emotion crossing those cold, cold eyes. But then there’s no jury to play to in this judge-alone trial.
Supplied evidence photos from Toronto Police at the Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. In the bag, beside the bed is gun.
Perhaps we have the laser vision of hindsight, but how did his father’s death not look suspicious? Did the aviation executive shoot himself in the left eye, carefully put the gun down on the floor and then tuck himself into a virtual fetal position?
Yet a coroner would deem it a suicide. Case closed — until his playboy heir was charged with murdering stranger Tim Bosma in May 2013 and authorities wondered whether he had killed before and made it look like a suicide.
Now Millard, 32, is facing murder charges for the third time, still sporting the small braid behind his right ear, some kind of Aboriginal pouch around his neck and looking unfortunately unscathed despite serving two consecutive life terms for killing Bosma and Laura Babcock.
“Not guilty,” he pleaded on a charge of first-degree murder in the death of his father on Nov. 29, 2012.
The Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. (Court supplied image)
When paramedic William Smith arrived at 5 Maple Gate Crt. at 7 p.m., he said the man’s son told him he’d tried to get hold of his father for a few days before finding him dead in bed. The elder Millard was cold to the touch and skin was dark. “He was beyond assistance,” he said.
Janet Campbell had last spoken to him about 15 hours earlier. First cousins through adoption, the pair had rekindled their friendship in 2012 and by November, they were dating and he’d spent the night at her home.
She described the elder Millard as a recluse — “he wasn’t a social animal” — whose passion was flying. “He was a pilot and he loved it,” she recalled with a smile.
He’d inherited MillardAir from his father, Carl, and told her he and his son were transforming the business into a Maintenance Repair Overhaul (“MRO”) operation to service large aircraft. They packed a lunch and he showed her around his new 55,000-square-foot hangar at Waterloo Regional Airport. “He was quite proud of that, actually.”
He was also smitten. “He said he loved me, that he adored me.”
The gun used in Wayne Millard’s death is shown at the murder trial of Dellen Millard. (Court supplied photo)
He’d already made plans for her birthday on Dec. 4: Clearing his calendar, buying a card and purchasing a gift he warned she might not like initially but would eventually love. After his death, Dellen Millard gave her the present his dad had chosen for her: A series of flying lessons.
“He was much more excited for my birthday than I was,” she recalled.
Despite defence lawyer Ravin Pillay’s attempts to suggest Wayne Millard suffered from depression, Campbell painted a portrait of a man who suddenly had a lot to live for: A new relationship, plans to explore their family roots together and a company that had just been awarded the Transport Canada licence it needed.
They’d spend hours talking on the phone and chatted until about 3 a.m. on the day of his death. While he had a drinking problem, she didn’t hear him slur his words that night.
Supplied evidence photos from Toronto Police at the Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard.
“Was he upset or anxious?” asked assistant Crown attorney Jill Cameron.
“No, not to the best of my knowledge,” Campbell replied. “He wasn’t a sad person.”
When she couldn’t reach him the next day, she became increasingly worried. His son finally replied to her frantic e-mails. “He said, ‘My father is dead, and it would appear by his own hand.’”
“I was stunned. I was totally, absolutely stunned.”
The trial continues.
mmandel@postmedia.com
MANDEL: Dellen Millard’s dad recluse but not ‘sad person,’ girlfriend tells trial | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#105
Dellen Millard says dad was depressed, stressed
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
June 4, 2018
Updated:
June 5, 2018 7:41 AM EDT
Dellen Millard is pictured in a police photo.
TORONTO — A twice-convicted killer on trial for allegedly murdering his father, whose death was initially ruled a suicide, said his dad was depressed, an alcoholic and under a great deal of stress because of a new aviation business the two were working on together, court heard Monday.
Prosecutors showed a 55-minute interview of Dellen Millard with two police detectives hours after Wayne Millard was found dead in his home on Nov. 29, 2012.
Dellen Millard, 32, has pleaded not guilty for first-degree murder of his father. The case was re-opened after he was arrested for the murder of Hamilton man Tim Bosma in May 2013.
Dellen Millard told detectives his father had depression, but never sought treatment for it.
“He carried some great sadness with him throughout life that I never knew — he never wanted to share that with me,” Dellen Millard said in the interview with police.
Dellen Millard Facebook
Earlier that day, Millard told police he came home and found his father dead in his bedroom at about 6:30 p.m. He told police the last time he saw Wayne Millard alive was the previous day at about noon.
Both Millards were in the final stages of re-launching Millardair, taking it from a company that rented out aircraft hangars to an aircraft repair operation at a new hangar at the Region of Waterloo International Airport.
Dellen Millard said he saw his father dead with blood on the pillow. He said he left the room, got his phone and called his mother, Madeleine Burns.
“She started screaming on the phone,” Millard said with a sniffle. He said he stayed on the phone with her until she arrived from her home north of Toronto. Then Burns went inside the house alone for about 10 minutes, then returned outside to her son and called 911.
Dellen Millard told detectives the business was causing a considerable amount of stress to the elder Millard and it had “more than a chance” of failing.
The Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. (Court supplied image)
He said Wayne Millard had “a very strong liver” because he “drank lots.”
“I don’t like to say the word alcoholic, but it fits, he was a regular drinker, like every night,” Dellen Millard said.
Det. James Hutcheon was one of two detectives who interviewed Millard and also investigated the home.
He said the coroner, Dr. David Evans, examined Wayne Millard’s body “and advised me the suicide appeared to be suspicious.”
Hutcheon said he notified homicide about the case, but was told by a homicide detective they wouldn’t go to the scene, but would “follow up in the morning.”
Hutcheon said Burns, Wayne Millard’s ex-wife, was shaken but Dellen Millard’s demeanour was different.
“He was very calm, and didn’t appear upset at all,” he said.
Supplied evidence photos from Toronto Police at the Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. In the bag, beside the bed is gun.
The coroner testified earlier Monday that he believed there was a “reasonable chance” Wayne Millard killed himself, but noted it was possible someone else pulled the trigger of the gun found beside the man.
He said he ruled the death a suicide within two days of Millard’s body being found in his home in late November 2012, and stuck by his findings in his final report more than six months later despite knowing Toronto police had re-opened the case.
“Looking at the scene, the trajectory of the bullet, the position of his left hand, the powder marks on his hand and his pillow, it would appear this death is consistent with suicide,” Evans said.
An autopsy found Wayne Millard died from a bullet to the brain that entered at his left eye and became lodged in the back of his head on the right side, Evans said.
“The soot on the hand and what I saw on the pillow and how his left hand was, I thought there was reasonable chance he had done this himself,” Evans said, but added that he had never seen a bullet through an eye in a suicide case.
Crown attorney Jill Cameron asked Evans if someone else could have pulled the trigger of the gun found.
The gun used in Wayne Millard’s death is shown at the murder trial of Dellen Millard. (Court supplied photo)
“At the time, I felt it was more consistent with a suicide,” Evans said. “In retrospect, one can say that’s a possibility.”
Evans noted, however, that he believed Wayne Millard may have turned the gun around to point it at his eye and pulled the trigger with his thumb.
The trial heard that when Evans entered the bedroom, he followed the trail of blood on Wayne Millard’s bed to a black gym bag on the floor and saw a revolver when he moved it — something police hadn’t noticed. Then he looked closer at the blood on Millard’s face, he said.
“I noticed the left eye was absent,” Evans said, adding that the death occurred at least 18 hours before he completed his investigation at about 11 p.m.
Court documents show Dellen Millard’s DNA was found on the gun’s handle. Last year, a gun trafficker pleaded guilty to selling Millard the revolver.
Dellen Millard was charged in his father’s death in April 2014.
Millard and his friend Mark Smich have been convicted of first-degree murder for the deaths Bosma and Toronto woman Laura Babcock.
Dellen Millard says dad was depressed, stressed | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#106
Judge excludes 'gruesome' photo of Dellen Millard from trial
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
June 11, 2018
Updated:
June 11, 2018 1:06 PM EDT
Dellen Millard is pictured in a police photo.
TORONTO — A judge at the first-degree murder trial of an aviation executive allegedly killed by his son has deemed a “gruesome” image of the accused inadmissible.
The prosecution wanted to put into evidence a photograph of Dellen Millard that shows the 32-year-old with a bloody eye. The image, which court heard did not appear to involve real blood, was purportedly uploaded by Millard to a gaming website just two weeks before Wayne Millard died on Nov. 29, 2012.
Wayne Millard’s death was initially ruled a suicide and the trial has heard his cause of death was a bullet through his left eye.
The Crown has argued that the photograph of Dellen Millard, used as his profile picture on the gaming site, was not just a coincidence.
Dellen Millard says dad was depressed, stressed
MANDEL: Dellen Millard allegedly emotionless after discovering dead father in bedroom
MANDEL: Dellen Millard’s dad recluse but not ‘sad person,’ girlfriend tells trial
They say a forensic audit of his computers show the image was taken in 2005, but used between Nov. 10, 2012, until May 6, 2013, the same day Millard killed Hamilton man Tim Bosma.
But Millard’s lawyer says the image is too prejudicial and not relevant at the judge-alone trial where his client has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder.
Justice Maureen Forestell called the image “gruesome” and said it will be excluded from evidence. Her reasons for doing so are expected to be detailed in a later written decision.
A retired provincial police forensic officer is expected to testify later today about an analysis of Millard’s computers found at his home after he was arrested for Bosma’s death.
Millard and his friend, Mark Smich, are currently serving life sentences for the first-degree murders of Bosma and Toronto woman Laura Babcock.
Judge excludes ‘gruesome’ photo of Dellen Millard from trial | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#107
Dellen Millard bought gun found next to dad, trial told
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
June 12, 2018
Updated:
June 12, 2018 8:58 AM EDT
Dellen Millard is pictured in a police photo.
TORONTO — Dellen Millard bought the handgun found next to his dad’s body from a weapons dealer a few months earlier, his trial heard Monday.
Jim Falconer, a retired forensic officer with the Ontario Provincial Police, took the court through text messages between Millard and a man who pleaded guilty last summer to selling the 32-year-old three handguns.
In one of them, Matthew Ward Jackson discusses a gun Millard might like, court heard.
“.32 but its really nice compact piece I’m sure ud like it,” Ward-Jackson wrote to Millard in a text on July 1, 2012. “But it’s gonna cost a lil. Thay’ve been prohibited for 30 yrs here now. So u got a very rare thing lucky u.”
“That’s great news!” Millard texted back. Court heard he bought the gun.
Dellen Millard says dad was depressed, stressed
MANDEL: Dellen Millard allegedly emotionless after discovering dead father in bedroom
MANDEL: Dellen Millard’s dad recluse but not ‘sad person,’ girlfriend tells trial
The messages were among hundreds found on Millard’s electronic devices and submitted as evidence at the judge-alone trial. Millard has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in his father’s death.
Wayne Millard, a wealthy aviation executive, died of a single gunshot wound through the eye in November 2012, court has heard.
The gun Dellen Millard bought from Ward Jackson — a .32-calibre Smith and Wesson revolver — was later found by a coroner next to the bed where Wayne Millard’s body lay, the trial heard. Documents show Dellen Millard’s DNA was found on the gun’s handle.
The trial has heard that the younger Millard told police he found his father dead on Nov. 29, 2012. He also told police the last time he saw Wayne Millard alive was the previous day at about noon.
Matthew Ward-Jackson sold a gun to Dellen Millard (Twitter)
An agreed statement of facts filed at the trial by the prosecution shows data indicating one of Dellen Millard’s phones moving from his friend Mark Smich’s house around 1 a.m. on Nov. 29, 2012, to his father’s home where it stayed until shortly after 6 a.m.
Court also saw numerous text messages between Millard and Smich discussing money problems. Millard had been propping the unemployed Smich up, paying for his cell phone bill and giving him spending money.
Earlier Monday, the prosecution tried to put into evidence a photograph of Millard that showed him with a bloody eye. The image, which court heard did not appear to involve real blood, was purportedly uploaded by Millard to a gaming website just two weeks before Wayne Millard died.
Crown attorney Ken Lockhart argued that the photograph, used as Dellen Millard’s profile picture on the gaming site, was not just a coincidence.
Supplied evidence photos from Toronto Police at the Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. In the bag, beside the bed is gun.
He argued a forensic audit of Millard’s computers show the image was taken in 2005, but used between Nov. 10, 2012 until May 6, 2013, the same day Millard killed Hamilton man Tim Bosma.
“If it was suicide, common sense would say this was an upsetting event and that Dellen Millard would not sit there and look at a bloody eye picture for hours on end,” Lockhart said.
But Millard’s lawyer, Ravin Pillay, said the image was too prejudicial and not relevant.
Justice Maureen Forestell, who called the image “gruesome,” sided with Pillay and excluded the image from evidence.
Millard and Smich have been convicted of first-degree murder for the deaths Bosma and Toronto woman Laura Babcock.
Dellen Millard bought gun found next to dad, trial told | Toronto Sun

Dellen Millard blamed dad for family business woes, trial told
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
June 12, 2018
Updated:
June 12, 2018 1:50 PM EDT
Dellen Millard Facebook
TORONTO — Dellen Millard called his dad a failure and blamed him for the family company’s financial woes in the days around his death.
Millard has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in the death of his father, Wayne Millard, whose passing was initially ruled a suicide.
Retired provincial police forensic detective Jim Falconer has presented scores of text messages in court from Dellen Millard around the time his father died on Nov. 29, 2012.
The texts were recovered from one of Millard’s computers found at the home he shared with his father in Toronto’s west end.
The younger Millard texted his girlfriend in the early morning hours of Nov. 30, 2012 — the day after his father’s body was found — that his dad had depression and shot and killed himself.
The Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. (Court supplied image)
In the texts read out by Falconer, Millard tells Christina Noudga his world has never been so upside down and adds that he told his father he blamed him for problems faced by Millardair, the family’s aviation business.
“The last time I spoke to him, I told him the company’s financial troubles were his doing and that he was a failure,” Millard wrote in the text read in court. “Usually he tells me not to worry. But this time he said maybe I was right.”
On Dec. 4, 2012 Dellen Millard fired everyone working at Millardair and wound the burgeoning company down, court has heard.
Wayne Millard had taken out a multimillion-dollar loan to build a new hangar at the Region of Waterloo International Airport in an effort to revamp the business and turn it into an operation that serviced, repaired and maintained aircraft, the trial has heard.
Supplied evidence photos from Toronto Police at the Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. In the bag, beside the bed is gun.
Just weeks before his death, Millardair had been approved by Transport Canada to operate the business.
The trial has heard that Dellen Millard told police he found his father dead in bed around 6 p.m. on Nov. 29, 2012. It has also heard that the younger Millard bought the handgun found next to his father’s body from a weapons dealer and Dellen Millard’s DNA was found on the handle of the gun.
Millard told police he last saw his father alive around noon the day before and said he stayed the night at his friend Mark Smich’s house. Phone records indicate one of Millard’s phones moved from Smich’s house around 1 a.m. on Nov. 29, 2012, to his father’s home where it stayed until shortly after 6 a.m.
Dellen Millard blamed dad for family business woes, trial told | Toronto Sun
Last edited by spaminator; Jun 13th, 2018 at 04:02 AM..
 
spaminator
#108
Dellen Millard's dad died immediately after being shot at close range, trial told
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
June 13, 2018
Updated:
June 13, 2018 1:21 PM EDT
Dellen MillardFacebook
TORONTO — A forensic pathologist says an aviation executive whose death was initially ruled a suicide died immediately after being shot in the face at close range.
Dr. Jayantha Herath says a bullet went through Wayne Millard’s left eye, travelled at an angle and ended up lodged in the right side of the brain above the ear.
Dellen Millard, 32, who has previously been convicted of two murders, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in his 71-year-old father’s death.
Herath says he performed an autopsy on Wayne Millard on Dec. 1, 2012, two days after his death.
Dellen Millard blamed dad for family business woes, trial told
Dellen Millard bought gun found next to dad, trial told
Dellen Millard says dad was depressed, stressed
He says the elder Millard’s eye was likely closed at the time and the muzzle of the gun was either touching the eye or within one centimetre when the gun went off.
Herath said no one could survive such an injury.
“He would die immediately within seconds,” Herath told court.
Herath showed court graphic images from his autopsy of Wayne Millard’s body. The judge warned the court beforehand and one woman left after a photograph of the destroyed eye was displayed.
Court has heard that the younger Millard called his father a failure and blamed him for the family company’s financial woes shortly before his death.
The trial has heard that Dellen Millard bought the handgun found beside his father’s body from a weapons dealer months earlier. The younger Millard told police he found his father dead in bed around 6 p.m. on Nov. 29, 2012 at the home the two shared in Toronto’s west end.
He told police he last saw his father alive around 12 p.m. the day before.
Court documents show Millard’s DNA was found on the handle of the gun.
Dellen Millard’s dad died immediately after being shot at close range, trial told | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#109
Dellen Millard trial hears gruesome details from dad's autopsy
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
June 14, 2018
Updated:
June 14, 2018 7:32 AM EDT
Dellen MillardFacebook
TORONTO — The trial of a twice-convicted murderer heard Wednesday from a forensic pathologist who described the gruesome details of the autopsy of the man’s father, whose death was initially ruled a suicide.
Dr. Jayantha Herath testified that Wayne Millard, 71, had his eyes closed when he was shot in the face at close range — the bullet entering his left eye at an angle and becoming lodged in the right side of his brain.
No one could survive that injury, Herath said. “He would die immediately within seconds.”
Dellen Millard blamed dad for family business woes, trial told
Dellen Millard bought gun found next to dad, trial told
Dellen Millard says dad was depressed, stressed
Millard’s son, 32-year-old Dellen Millard, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in the death of his father on Nov. 29, 2012. It’s the third murder trial for the younger Millard, who is serving two consecutive life sentences for killing a former lover and a Hamilton man who went missing in May 2013.
Justice Maureen Forestell warned the court before Herath showed graphic images from the autopsy. Gasps filled the courtroom and one woman walked out after a photograph of Wayne Millard’s eye wound was displayed on large-screen televisions.
Dellen Millard, seated in the prisoner’s box wearing a grey blazer with his customary side braid, recoiled at the image.
The pathologist also examined Wayne Millard’s liver, which he said was fatty and inflamed. The most common cause is due to alcohol abuse, he testified, but it could also be from excessive fat in the body or from painkillers such as opioids.
A woman who was dating Wayne Millard at the time of his death previously told court he was an alcoholic, but was working to decrease his alcohol consumption. Dellen Millard also told police that his father was an alcoholic, depressed and stressed out from his recently transformed family aviation company, Millardair.
The Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. (Court supplied image)
The coroner ruled Wayne Millard’s death a suicide within two days and stuck with that conclusion in his final report seven months later. Dr. David Evans previously told court that he believed there was a “reasonable chance” Wayne Millard killed himself, but noted it was possible someone else pulled the trigger.
Court has heard that the younger Millard called his father a failure and blamed him for Millardair’s financial woes shortly before his death.
The trial has heard that Dellen Millard bought the handgun found beside his father’s body from a weapons dealer months earlier. He told police he found his father dead in bed around 6 p.m. on Nov. 29, 2012 at the home the two shared in Toronto’s west end.
Supplied evidence photos from Toronto Police at the Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. In the bag, beside the bed is gun.
He also told police he last saw his father alive around 12 p.m. the day before.
Court documents show Millard’s DNA was found on the handle of the gun.
A crime scene reconstruction expert is expected to testify Thursday.
The Crown is winding down its case, with its last witness expected to testify on Friday.
Dellen Millard trial hears gruesome details from dad’s autopsy | Toronto Sun

MANDEL: Expert crime reconstructionist doubts Wayne Millard shot himself
Michele Mandel
More from Michele Mandel
Published:
June 14, 2018
Updated:
June 14, 2018 8:51 PM EDT
two-time convicted killer Dellen Millard is currently on trial for his father's murder.Facebook
At his third murder trial, convicted killer Dellen Millard leans in from the prisoner’s box, closely following the testimony of a crime scene reconstruction expert who could be his undoing.
Unlike the bungling police officers who first came on the scene and bought the suicide story, Det.-Const. Grant Sutherland doesn’t believe the gunshot residue indicates that Millard’s father shot himself on Nov. 29, 2012.
From the way Wayne Millard was positioned on his blood-soaked bed, it would have taken a contortionist to hold the grip of the .32 calibre Smith and Wesson revolver practically upside down to shoot himself in the left eye.
The .32 calibre Smith and Wesson revolver that ended Wayne Millards life in 2012.
“I don’t believe that he did,” Sutherland told Crown attorney Jill Cameron of the suicide theory.
If he didn’t shoot himself, then someone else pulled the trigger. And prosecutors argue that person is his own son, which would make the murderer of Tim Bosma and Laura Babcock a triple killer.
Millard, 32, has pleaded not guilty in the judge-alone trial before Justice Maureen Forestell. He’s currently serving two consecutive life sentences.
In 2014, a year after Millard’s arrest for Bosma’s murder, Sutherland was called in by Toronto homicide detectives to revisit the suicide of the suspect’s father. Asked to review the scene photos and autopsy report, the expert with the firearms analysis and investigation unit said he noticed early on that there was something about the gunshot residue staining on the pillow that didn’t make sense.
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
Millard told police he found his 71-year-old father dead in the family’s Etobicoke home. The wealthy aviation scion was lying on his left side, his right hand tucked under his face, his left arm outstretched. The gun was found nearby on the floor.
Court has heard the younger Millard had purchased the Smith and Wesson several months earlier from gun dealer Matthew Ward Jackson and that his DNA was found on its grip.
Sutherland opened the evidence box and held up the small wood-handled revolver, explaining how the bullets discharge from the six-chamber cylinder and the blow back soot they leave behind.
If his father had shot himself with his left hand, as the original investigators had concluded, Sutherland said he would have expected to see the dark stain on the opposite side of the pillow from where it was. There also would have been gunshot residue on the senior Millard’s left hand – but there was none.
At the Ontario Police College in November 2015, Sutherland ran a series of videotaped test fires to see what position it would take to end up with the same pattern of gunshot residue found on the dead man’s pillow. He used the same revolver found at the scene and a styrofoam head and mannequin arms to try to replicate Millard’s position when the muzzle had been placed at or very close to his left eye.
Supplied evidence photos from Toronto Police at the Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. In the bag, beside the bed is gun.
“Very few suicides are by gunshot to the eye,”Sutherland noted before defence lawyer Ravin Pillay stood to object. Pillay is expected to argue that none of this evidence should be considered by the judge.
The position of the revolver that most closely resulted in the same gunshot residue pattern had the gun on its left side, the barrel pointing toward the top of the pillow, he testified. It wasn’t impossible for Millard’s dad to have held it like that in his left hand, but it would be upside down, “very, very difficult” and “very unlikely.”
The prosecutor asked him to demonstrate. By the end, the officer looked like a pretzel – and the Crown attorney’s point had been made.
Millard’s lawyer is set to cross-examine Sutherland on Friday.
mmandel@postmedia.com
MANDEL: Expert crime reconstructionist doubts Wayne Millard shot himself | Toronto Sun
Last edited by spaminator; Jun 15th, 2018 at 03:08 AM..
 
spaminator
#110
MANDEL: Desperate defence effort to destroy damning evidence at Millard murder trial
Michele Mandel
More from Michele Mandel
Published:
June 15, 2018
Updated:
June 15, 2018 8:58 PM EDT
Dellen Millard Facebook
When Toronto Police arrived at the Millard family home on a November night in 2012, they quickly assumed the wealthy patriarch had shot himself in the eye and with the coroner’s agreement, closed the case as a suicide.
Fast forward almost six years, twice-convicted killer Dellen Millard is on trial for murdering his father and staging it as a fatal, self-inflicted gunshot wound. The Crown’s key witness has testified forensic testing shows it’s unlikely the 71-year-old Millard could have managed to shoot himself.
To avoid a conviction trifecta — the aviation heir is already serving two consecutive life sentences for the murders of Tim Bosma and Laura Babcock — it was imperative for Millard’s lawyer to discredit that damning testimony.
And Ravin Pillay certainly earned his pay.
Dellin Millard’s lawyer Ravin Pillay arrives at the Tim Bosma murder trial in Hamilton on February 3, 2016. (Michael Peake/Toronto Sun/ Postmedia Network)
Unfortunately Det.-Const. Grant Sutherland was being asked to answer for the sleepy police investigation done years before he was called in.
For hours upon hours, Sutherland was on his feet in the witness box, grilled by Millard’s defence lawyer about his evidence. Despite the tough and often impatient questioning, the bespectacled expert never wavered in respectfully and patiently standing by his conclusion that suicide didn’t forensically make sense.
By looking at scene photos of the dead man’s position and the location of gunshot residue on hs pillow, he’d run almost two dozen firing tests into a styrofoam head with the same gun to try to see what angle would replicate the black soot pattern.
The .32 calibre Smith and Wesson revolver that ended Wayne Millards life in
By his estimation — with the senior Millard lying on his left side with his right hand tucked under his head and left arm extended — the gun would have been positioned on its left side against the pillow, the barrel pointing toward his left eye. Sutherland concluded the only way he could have pulled the trigger in that position was by having the .32 calibre revolver practically upside down in his left hand.
Pillay challenged it all.
Assuming it was a suicide, police had never seized the pillow into evidence and so the officer had nothing to examine. Pillay accused Sutherland of not even knowing if it was a regular or king size when he purchased new pillows for his firing tests. He agreed that was the case.
The lawyer suggested he didn’t know whether anything had been moved before the police photos had been taken.
“I had no reason to believe there was contamination of the scene,” Sutherland replied.
No ruler was placed in any of the photos, a basic in forensic photography.
“You have no accurate measurement of anything in the scene, correct?” Pillay demanded.
Sutherland agreed, but insisted he still had “points of reference.”
Pillay questioned why he hadn’t sourced the exact same bullets for his tests. The officer maintained that he’d found similar ones by the same manufacturer and the results would not have been any different.
The defence lawyer accused him of having a police bias bent on proving this wasn’t a suicide from the beginning.
“I hadn’t ruled out suicide,” he said.
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
Pillay’s best shot came near the end of the gruelling day.
He put up a photo of the gun position that Sutherland had drawn the previous afternoon, showing where his tests indicated the revolver would have been angled up through Millard’s left eye. Pillay then showed an X-ray of the deceased man’s head which showed the trajectory of the bullet was actually pointing down, not up.
“I suggest your orientation of the firearm must be wrong,” he insisted. “You missed this, didn’t you?”
“I disagree,” the officer replied.
Sutherland went on to explain that the recovered bullet was deformed at the tip, suggesting it hit something in the skull that deflected it from travelling in the straight line trajectory assumed by the lawyer.
“Where’s that in your report?” Pillay demanded again.
Sutherland explained — for the umpteenth time — that he wasn’t asked to reconstruct the shooting or the path of the bullet, but to determine the position of the gun when it was fired.
Had Pillay done enough to discredit him? If not, he has one last chance. In this judge-alone trial, the defence lawyer will argue next week that Sutherland’s evidence shouldn’t be admissible at all.
mmandel@postmedia.com
MANDEL: Desperate defence effort to destroy damning evidence at Millard murder trial | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#111
MANDEL: Judge rules out crucial Crown evidence in Millard trial
Michele Mandel
More from Michele Mandel
Published:
June 22, 2018
Updated:
June 22, 2018 7:17 PM EDT
Dellen Millard Facebook
It would be his first big win, but nobody much cares about killer Dellen Millard anymore.
As the double murderer stands trial a third and final time – now for allegedly shooting his father in the left eye and making it look like a suicide – the downtown courtroom is practically empty and far from the capacity crowds that lined up to see him and Mark Smich tried for slaying stranger Tim Bosma and former girlfriend Laura Babcock.
The only stalwarts are a few curious spectators and Babcock’s mother.
Already serving two consecutive life sentences, not much changes if the aviation heir is found guilty a third time other than losing access to his inheritance. And there’s not much he can do with it while he lives out his days behind bars.
How it must hurt the narcissist to look around and see so few still interested in his evil ways.
When Wayne Millard, 71, was discovered dead in his bed by his son in the family’s Etobicoke home in November 2012, the coroner quickly ruled it a suicide. The case was reopened after Millard was arrested for the murders of Bosma and Babcock and he was soon charged with his dad’s death as well. Millard, 32, has pleaded not guilty.
The .32 calibre Smith and Wesson revolver that was found next to Wayne Millard’s body.
After cheaping out and representing himself at the Babcock trial — which obviously didn’t go well for him — he now has Ravin Pillay defending him at the judge-alone proceedings.
And the defence lawyer scored a large victory Friday when Ontario Superior Court Justice Maureen Forestell threw out key prosecution evidence. The Crown’s shooting reconstructionist had testified that the elder Millard wouldn’t have been able to shoot himself in the left eye but she found Det. Const. Grant Sutherland was “unable or unwilling to offer impartial evidence.”
Was that a ghost of a smile crossing the cocky killer’s face?
Sutherland had been called in by Toronto homicide two years after the senior’s death to examine the only evidence they still had: the gun and scene photos of the body, pillow and bed. The wealthy aviation executive was lying on his left side, his right hand tucked under his face, his left arm outstretched, looking as if he’d been asleep.
The pillow was stained with gunshot residue and the revolver was found nearby on the floor.
Using the same .32 calibre revolver — which Dellen Millard had purchased from a gun dealer several months before his father’s death — Sutherland had conducted almost two dozen firing tests into styrofoam heads, trying different gun positions to replicate the black residue pattern. To get the same shaped stain, he said the father would have had to shoot himself with the gun virtually upside down.
The judge excluded much of it.
Under cross-examination, Sutherland had been tripped up by Pillay. He insisted that he’d based his reconstruction on the scene photos and nothing had come between Wayne Millard and the gun to interrupt the gunshot residue patterning.
But Pillay took him to photos of a blanket by the dead man’s feet, its corner stained with blood. At some point, that blanket must have been pulled up and by his head.
The Etobicoke home of Wayne Millard. (Court supplied image)
Pillay accused the forensics officer of completely missing those photos when reaching his conclusions and that’s why the blood on the blanket isn’t even mentioned in his notes. The judge assumed worse – that Sutherland had failed to disclose it because it didn’t fit with his “biased” point of view.
“I have concluded that Det. Const. Sutherland failed to disclose his awareness of evidence that could have undermined his conclusions,” Forestell said.
She allowed generic testimony about how the gun is fired and where residue would exit the firearm. But that’s about it.
“The balance of his evidence is not admissible,” she ruled. “His opinion on the likelihood of Wayne Millard firing the gun is not admissible.”
With that victory, Pillay asked to confer with his client and returned to inform the judge that he wouldn’t be calling any defence evidence. Why risk putting the playboy killer on the stand now?
Closing arguments are scheduled for Monday.
mmandel@postmedia.com
MANDEL: Judge rules out crucial Crown evidence in Millard trial | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#112
Millard had means, motive, opportunity to kill dad: Crown
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
June 25, 2018
Updated:
June 25, 2018 8:28 PM EDT
Dellen Millard is pictured in a police photo.
TORONTO — A Toronto man killed his aviation executive father to access millions in inheritance, prosecutors alleged at the trial of the twice-convicted murderer on Monday, while the defence argued the death was a simple case of suicide.
The assertions were presented in closing arguments at the first-degree murder trial of Dellen Millard, 32, who has pleaded not guilty to killing his father, 71-year-old Wayne Millard.
The older Millard died on Nov. 29, 2012. Court has heard he was found with a bullet lodged in his brain after being shot through his left eye. The coroner and police initially concluded he died by suicide.
“Wayne Millard did not kill himself,” Crown lawyer Jill Cameron said. “Dellen Millard carried about a calculated plan to murder his father and cover it up.”
Wayne Millard had a $10-million plan to transform the family’s aviation business, Millardair, into a maintenance shop for passenger jets, the judge-alone trial heard. He told many people he was creating the business for his son.
“Wayne Millard was spending the family money creating a legacy for Dellen Millard that he didn’t want,” Cameron said.
Shortly after Wayne Millard died, his son — a co-owner of Millardair — fired all employees and returned a crucial license from the federal government to operate the company, the Crown said.
“(Dellen Millard) now had money, power, freedom and control,” Cameron said.
Dellen Millard’s defence lawyer argued, however, that Wayne Millard was depressed, an alcoholic and “drowning” underneath the stress of the business, echoing what his client told police shortly after his father died.
“There is an overwhelming body of evidence that points to suicide,” Ravin Pillay said.
“It was a suicide then, it is a suicide now.”
The Crown said Dellen Millard’s plan to murder his father crystallized on Nov. 1, 2012, when the family aviation business received a maintenance, repair and overhaul certificate from Transport Canada.
“The plan was hatched as soon as that licence came through for a business he didn’t want,” Cameron said. “Money was being funnelled out, his inheritance being spent.”
That’s the same day the younger Millard bought a second cellphone, the Crown said.
Court has heard that phone was used to call a cab from the home of Millard’s friend, Mark Smich, in Oakville, Ont., early on Nov. 29, 2012. Records show that phone was at the home Millard shared with his father at about 1 a.m. that day, and then back at Smich’s house at 6 a.m.
Pillay countered that there was no proof that Millard was travelling with that phone and that it wouldn’t make sense to use a phone that was still registered in his name, if this was, in fact, murder.
Millard left behind his main phone and a credit card so Smich and his girlfriend could buy pizza, the Crown alleged. Cameron said it was all a ruse to create a false alibi.
The coroner put Wayne Millard’s death between 3 a.m. and 5 a.m., court heard.
The Crown said Wayne Millard was not suicidal, but hopeful for the future, and had made plans for the day after he had been found dead, as well as plans to teach his girlfriend how to fly.
“Everything was coming up Wayne,” Cameron said.
She also said Wayne Millard couldn’t have physically shot himself in the face because of his position in his bed, where he was found lying on his side with a revolver nearby.
Pillay said it’s impossible to reconstruct the moment of shooting with any certainty.
The judge-alone trial has heard Dellen Millard bought the revolver found next to his father’s body from a gun dealer, and that his DNA was found on the weapon.
Pillay said the DNA on the gun could have simply come from his client buying it.
Ultimately, Pillay concluded, suicide is a complex issue and, in this case, misunderstood by the Crown.
“With years of untreated depression compounded by decades of alcohol abuse, Wayne Millard was driven to a final impulsive act,” he said.
Wayne Millard’s entire life was devoted to his son, Pillay said. And when Dellen Millard told his father that he was a failure and the reason behind the company’s financial troubles, Wayne Millard broke down.
“That must have been very painful,” Pillay said.
Millard is currently serving two life sentences for the deaths of Toronto woman Laura Babcock and Hamilton man Tim Bosma.
The judge said she may have a verdict by July 19, but the decision may come in September due to her caseload.
Millard had means, motive, opportunity to kill dad: Crown | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#113
Dellen Millard killed dad to get millions in inheritance: Crown | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#114
Verdict date set for Dellen Millard in dad's death
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
July 19, 2018
Updated:
July 19, 2018 1:57 PM EDT
Dellen Millard Facebook
TORONTO — A Toronto judge says she will deliver a decision in late September at the trial of a man accused of killing his father, whose death was initially deemed a suicide.
Dellen Millard, 32, of Toronto, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in the death of 71-year-old Wayne Millard.
Dellen Millard killed dad to get millions in inheritance: Crown
MANDEL: Judge rules out crucial Crown evidence in Millard trial
Dellen Millard trial hears gruesome details from dad’s autopsy
The judge-alone trial heard that Wayne Millard was found dead in his bed with a bullet in his brain on Nov. 29, 2012.
The Crown alleges the younger Millard killed his father because millions in potential inheritance money was being squandered on a new aviation business for the family company, Millardair.
The defence says Wayne Millard’s death was a suicide.
Justice Maureen Forestell says she will rule on the case on Sept. 24.
The murder trial is the third for Dellen Millard, who has been convicted of first-degree murder for the deaths of Toronto woman Laura Babcock and Hamilton man Tim Bosma.
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...-in-dads-death
 
spaminator
#115
MANDEL: Dellen Millard a serial killer after conviction for murdering his dad
Michele Mandel
Published:
September 24, 2018
Updated:
September 24, 2018 7:41 PM EDT
Dellen Millard always thought he was the smartest man in the room. With that infamous smirk, the spoiled rich kid believed he could get away with whatever he wished — even murder.
Now he sat slumped in the prisoner’s box in the downtown Toronto courtroom after being found guilty for the third time of first-degree murder — this time of his own father. The “mastermind” playboy criminal was unmasked as nothing more than a sloppy serial killer who will serve so many life terms that he’ll never know freedom again.
He had it all. And his father wanted to give him even more. Instead, his only child put a bullet in his eye.
Along with his partner-in-crime, Mark Smich, the former aviation heir is already doing two consecutive life sentences for killing ex-girlfriend Laura Babcock of Toronto and stranger Tim Bosma of Ancaster.
The .32-calibre Smith and Wesson revolver that was found next to Wayne Millard’s body.
But this murder he did alone. And thanks to a bungling police and coroner investigation, Millard very nearly got away with it.
When he called police to his family home on 5 Maple Gate in Etobicoke on Nov. 29, 2012, they found Wayne Millard’s cold body in bed with a gunshot wound through his eye.
It was quickly ruled a suicide.
He was only charged in 2014 after detectives began investigating Millard in connection to Bosma’s death during a test drive and Babcock’s disappearance.
After the verdict, Toronto Police Det.-Sgt. Mike Carbone wouldn’t comment on mistakes made by the original police investigation that almost allowed him to escape justice.
And go on to kill again.
The parents of his victims were in the packed courtroom as Superior Court Justice Maureen Forestell found Millard guilty of patricide, as well.
“I am satisfied beyond a reasonable doubt that Dellen Millard killed his father by shooting him in the eye as he slept,” the judge said in a ruling that ran almost two hours.
Unlike the other murder cases against him, this one depended on circumstantial evidence. At first, the judge seemed to suggest the 71-year-old Millard took his own life: He was suffering from alcoholism and the financial pressures of building a multi-million dollar airplane maintenance hangar in Waterloo to leave to his son.
But Forestell went on to itemize the “reasonable inferences” she could draw that all pointed to his being murdered by his own progeny, including cellphone tower data showing Millard near his father’s home that night when he told police he was in Oakville as well as his DNA on the revolver used in the shooting.
“To conclude that this constellation of circumstances — the false alibi, Dellen Millard near the Millard home and the use of Dellen Millard’s gun — occurred coincidentally on the day that Wayne Millard was killed would be irrational and fanciful.”
Millard, 33, hung his head when he realized the judge was going to convict him of his third murder.
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
He thought he could get away with it. He counted on inheriting his father’s wealth. But once again, the cell tower data would be his undoing.
The courtroom erupted in applause as the serial killer was handcuffed and taken away.
“This has been another emotional day for many people,” said Babcock’s father, Clayton.
“It’s been proven that not only the Bosmas and ourselves have lost a loved one, the Millard family must live with the fact that this heinous individual murdered his own father. We feel for Wayne’s relatives — save for one.”
He said his wife Linda attended the trial every day even though she never met Wayne Millard and it was so difficult to see her daughter’s killer every day.
“But she had to be there to represent all of his victims. She wanted to make sure that Wayne always had someone in court who cared about him and the results of the trial.”
Dogged Crown attorneys Jill Cameron and Ken Lockhart, who also successfully prosecuted Millard for Babcock’s slaying, said they’ll be seeking a third consecutive life term during sentencing submissions Nov. 16. To critics who argue that consecutive life sentences are too harsh, Babcock’s father said they haven’t endured their kind of pain.
“We live with a cloud of sadness and loss over us every day,” he told reporters. “Like all people who have lost a close loved one through tragedy, there will not be a day in our lives when the loss of Laura, Tim or Wayne won’t be felt.”
It’s the kind of love that a psychopath like Millard would never understand.
mmandel@postmedia.com
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Oxk_cznPqPo
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...ath-of-his-dad
 
Walter
#116
May he rot.
 
Curious Cdn
#117
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

May he rot.

... in Hell, eventually.
 
spaminator
#118
MANDEL: Crown wants triple killer Dellen Millard jailed until at least age 102
Michele Mandel
Published:
November 16, 2018
Updated:
November 16, 2018 6:56 PM EST
Dellen Millard is shown in a police handout photo.THE CANADIAN PRESS
Model prisoner. Ruthless serial killer.
Which should trump which?
The answer is easy for most of us. No matter how well he may be behaving at the Toronto East detention centre, triple killer Dellen Millard should have to serve a third, consecutive life sentence for murdering his father in addition to the two he’s already netted for killing former lover Laura Babcock and stranger Tim Bosma.
Laura Babcock, left, and Tim Bosma were murdered by Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, juries found.
But his lawyer, Ravin Pillay, had the uphill battle of trying to convince Ontario Superior Court Justice Maureen Forestell why the smug aviation heir shouldn’t be burdened with a further 25-year parole ineligibility on top of the current 50 years he’s doing for the senseless killings of Babcock and Bosma.
As it stands now, Millard, 33, isn’t eligible for parole until 2063 when he will be 77. A third consecutive, rather than concurrent, life term for killing Wayne Millard would make him ineligible for parole until he’s the ripe old age of 102.
Meaning he’d be getting out of prison in a pine wood box.
Pillay tendered a thin file of four documents in support of the convicted killer: A “certificate of participation” in the Native Spirituality Program run by the John Howard Society at the Toronto East – which would explain the Native medicine pouch he always wears around his neck – as well as a supportive letter from the liaison officer who runs the program; a letter from his mom Madeleine Burns and one from the Toronto East security manager who says Millard is respectful and has no issues with other inmates.
Triple killer Dellen Millard’s certificate of participation in the Native Spirituality Program run by the John Howard Society at the Toronto East detention centre. (court exhibit)
“He has been a model inmate and demonstrates capacity for rehabilitation,” Pillay insisted.
That’s his job to say those things. That his devoted mother is still in denial is hard to believe.
Burns decries the “distortions” about her son.
“As a child, a teenager and a young man, he empathically served others in need,” says the delusional mother of the man convicted of killing three and burning two of their bodies in an animal incinerator.
Supplied court exhibit image with the filename – eliminator – from the Dellen Millard and Mark Smich first-degree murder trial in the death of Laura Babcock.
Millard rescued injured wildlife and stray cats and dogs, Burns says. He was the generous guy who picked up the cheque.
“Dellen was sensitive to those who needed support: the elderly, little people who needed attention and fun and those struggling in life.”
Funny, that statement. “Little people?” What does that even mean?
And does the elderly she speaks of include Millard’s 71-year-old father who battled alcoholism and was shot in the eye, his death staged as a suicide?
Did those “struggling in life” include Babcock, his first murder victim, who was homeless and strung out when she turned to Millard for help?
“To my view,” she writes, “Dellen is an empath and does not in the least fit the damaging profile of those invested in selling newspapers or those making money off hateful blogs in the name of journalism.”
No, ma’am, don’t blame the messenger for your sad excuse for a son.
Crown attorney Jill Cameron was right when she told the judge there’s nothing positive to say for Millard.
His father had gambled everything on his new aviation maintenance business so he could leave a legacy for his only child. For that devotion, his son lay in wait for hours until he fell asleep and then, up close and personal, shot him right in the face.
MANDEL: Dellen Millard’s dad recluse but not ‘sad person,’ girlfriend tells trial
MANDEL: Dellen Millard a serial killer after conviction for murdering his dad
The elder Millard had just found love with a former childhood sweetheart.
“I was his first love, he was mine,” Janet Campbell wrote in her victim impact statement. “We had been engaged as young adults. I still have that ring. That young man still remained within him.”
They were planning their future together; he’d been teasing her about the gift he’d bought for her birthday. But that all ended Nov. 29, 2012.
“Any hope for his future was callously snuffed out by an ungrateful and selfish son,” Cameron said.
And where some can blame their crimes on a deprived childhood or tough breaks, she said that’s not the case with the privileged Millard.
“There is no explanation for his crimes other than pure entitlement, depravity and evil,” she told the court. “Is there anyone he wouldn’t kill?”
Millard declined an opportunity to speak other than to say “the facts of the other cases are very much in dispute.”
Forestell has reserved her decision until Dec. 18.
mmandel@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...-least-age-102
 
Curious Cdn
#119
A trash compactor would be too good an end for him. With a little luck, another prisoner will cut his throat and save the Canadian taxpayer the millions to keep his sorry hide alive through the 21st century.
 

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