First Nations in Canada touted as land-management leaders


mentalfloss
+2
#1
First Nations in Canada touted as land-management leaders

Amid the court challenges, war of words, sit-ins and street protests that have marked First Nations relations with Canada’s resource sector, it might surprise some Canadians that aboriginal land management in this country is being held up as a model to the world.

Members of three remote native communities are in Sydney, Australia, this week, where the World Parks Congress is holding its sixth international summit.

They’re part of a global movement showcasing ways to balance aboriginal rights, cultural protection, resource development and environmental stewardship.

“There’s some real leadership happening in Canada,” said Valerie Courtois, director of the Aboriginal Leadership Initiative for the International Boreal Conservation Campaign, before departing for Sydney this week.

Representatives of the Grand Cree of Quebec, the North West Territories’ Lutsel K’e and Manitoba’s Poplar River First Nation have been invited to the congress, which meets every 10 years to discuss biodiversity, conservation and the state of the world’s parks and protected areas.

This year, Canada has garnered global attention.

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When the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the Tsilhqot’in First Nation in B.C. had aboriginal title to more than 1,700 square kilometres of traditional territory, it’s fair to say the decision rattled the country’s resource sector.

“This is not merely a right of first refusal with respect to Crown land management or usage plans,” Chief Justice Beverly McLachlin wrote in the unanimous June 26 decision.

“Rather, it is a right to proactively use and manage the land.”

However that collective title was not unencumbered, said the court, and current generations must not make decisions “that would prevent future generations of the group from using and enjoying it.”

“Nor can the land be developed or misused in a way that would substantially deprive future generations of the benefit of the land,” McLachlin wrote.

The right-leaning Fraser Institute responded to the ruling with an analysis that warned, “There is a possibility that already existing economic development projects may be suspended or shut down.”

The Tsilhqot’in are among First Nations who are now drafting their own resource management and land stewardship policies.

“This is not about saying ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to development,” said Courtois, who will address a World Parks Congress forum on Saturday.

“It’s an artificial dichotomy. It’s really about how much is enough.”

The real goal is taking charge of managing your own land, she said. For Innu such as herself, for example, survival of the caribou is central to their way of life. If development fails to protect caribou, that’s a failed management strategy.

Aboriginal consent, she said, “allows for a dialogue” and should be seen in a positive light. “It’s a condition for ‘yes.’ ” Steven Nitah is the Lutsel K’e lead negotiator on the creation of the massive Thaidene Nene protected area in the Northwest Territories.

He says the Dene people have been stewards of the land for millennia. Negotiations for the protected area with the federal and territorial governments, now near conclusion, long predate the Tsilhqot’in court ruling.

“This is just a continuation [of historic practice], using modern tools and legislation,” said Nitah. “I think we were ahead of the game.”

Far to the east, along the Manitoba-Ontario border, Sophia Rabliauskas of Poplar River First Nation is among those pursuing World Heritage Site status for a huge range of boreal forest known as Pimachiowin Aki.

Their bid, which was deferred in 2013, has highlighted shortcomings in the assessment process and is seen as a global test case for new ways of recognizing “cultural landscapes” – indigenous people, their culture and their geography together. That’s on the agenda in Sydney this week as well.

Rabliauskas said she’s not anti-development, but resource developments can’t take place in Pimachiowin Aki and they must benefit the people who actually live in the developed area.

“When you stand up for your rights, it’s seen as difficult or confrontational,” she said. “It doesn’t have to be that way.”

Nitah noted the Lutsel K’e negotiated terms of the development of a zinc mine that borders the Thaidene Nene preserve, and Dene rangers will monitor the land for environmental damage.

“It’s not all doom and gloom because aboriginal people have rights now,” he said.

Indeed, for a federal government that has dramatically slashed Parks Canada funding and employment, empowering First Nations rangers or “guardians” to monitor remote land preserves may be seen as win-win.

The Lutsel K’e are training their rangers in traditional lore and land practices, which reinforces cultural bonds.

It’s a model that is already widely used in Australia, and aboriginal land managers from down under visited Lutsel K’e just this month to share best practices.

“In the end, we can’t fail in this,” said Courtois.

“If we fail, we fail our culture. The stakes are really high for us.”

First Nations in Canada touted as land-management leaders - The Globe and Mail
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#2
Saying anything good about Indians is racist.
 
mentalfloss
#3
Indians?
 
gerryh
#4
He's apparently an injun so he's allowed to say that. Kinda like African Americans being allowed to say nig ger
 
Machjo
#5
'American Indian' is still used in the USA, just less so in Canada but still not offensive.
 
Zipperfish
No Party Affiliation
+5
#6  Top Rated Post
Meh. Many reserves I've been to are environmental disasters. Unregulated landfills filled with hazardous waste, leaking underground storage tanks, raw sewage pipes running into streams. By all means, give the aboriginal people of Canada the rights and title they are guaranteed in the Constitution, but let's not kid ourselves that they are any different than the rest of us.
 
petros
+3
#7
Can somebody please find out who these people are so they can come to North Central Regina and clean up the f-cking mess?
 
Tecumsehsbones
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Indians?

Sorry. Redskins.
 
grainfedpraiboy
+2
#9
The reserve system in Canada does not work and should be disbanded and a new self supporting system that integrates with society similar to Hutterite colonies should be implemented for those wishing to remain on reserve. Those who do not should be integrated into the broader society.

For those who live on reserves they deserve the same consideration over resource development that any farmer or other steward of the land would receive. Canada, given it's vast size and abundance of resources should set the global standard for sustainable resource extraction, environmental management and aboriginal cooperation.
 
petros
+2
#10
Forming political parties on the National and Provincial scale with each Rez as a Riding would work well.
 
Twila
+2
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Saying anything good about Indians is racist.

And will get you bombarded by excuses why natives are ALL screwed up and non can possibly be any good.

There doesn't appear to be any other race, currently, that has to fight so hard to have their upstanding members recognized. Every single time Natives get accolades or positive acknowledgement someone gets upset and has to denegrate the entire race via examples of those who've succumbed to failure. It's almost like we aren't quite able to acknowledge that Natives are also human and therefore are subject to ALL the same problems that all races of humans have. It's that or there is such an underlying sense of shame felt for what's been done to them at just the mere mention of this particular group of humans...
 
Tecumsehsbones
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

And will get you bombarded by excuses why natives are ALL screwed up and non can possibly be any good.

There doesn't appear to be any other race, currently, that has to fight so hard to have their upstanding members recognized. Every single time Natives get accolades or positive acknowledgement someone gets upset and has to denegrate the entire race via examples of those who've succumbed to failure. It's almost like we aren't quite able to acknowledge that Natives are also human and therefore are subject to ALL the same problems that all races of humans have. It's that or there is such an underlying sense of shame felt at the mere mention of this particular group of humans...

Whiny-a$$ crybaby liberal.
 
grainfedpraiboy
+3
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

There doesn't appear to be any other race, currently, that has to fight so hard to have their upstanding members recognized

I think both aboriginal and black women are the two most marginalized groups of people in NA.
 
Twila
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Whiny-a$$ crybaby liberal.

Too early, haven't a retort. Haven't even a tort...gawd I'm hungry...

Quote: Originally Posted by grainfedpraiboy View Post

I think both aboriginal and black women are the two most marginalized groups of people in NA.

I agree with you.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

Too early, haven't a retort. Haven't even a tort...gawd I'm hungry...

Here ya go. . .


 
Twila
+2
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Here ya go. . .


I was thinking something more along the lines of




hey, but if thats gin distilling, I'll take some of that TOO! Just got to locate the rasberry lemonade and ice...
 
Sal
No Party Affiliation
+2
#17
can it be rum...then all I need is the frozen banana a bit of honey and some coconut milk...if I use coconut milk and fruit I don't have wait until 5
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by grainfedpraiboy View Post

The reserve system in Canada does not work and should be disbanded and a new self supporting system that integrates with society similar to Hutterite colonies should be implemented for those wishing to remain on reserve. Those who do not should be integrated into the broader society.

For those who live on reserves they deserve the same consideration over resource development that any farmer or other steward of the land would receive. Canada, given it's vast size and abundance of resources should set the global standard for sustainable resource extraction, environmental management and aboriginal cooperation.

Better yet, give the land directly to the individuals and end the system that way.

That will put an immediate end to the graft, corruption and misuse of the land
 
Tecumsehsbones
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Better yet, give the land directly to the individuals and end the system that way.

That will put an immediate end to the graft, corruption and misuse of the land

Better yet, condemn it and auction it off.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#20
I suppose that as long as the 'owners' are good with that...
 
Tecumsehsbones
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

I suppose that as long as the 'owners' are good with that...

True. Gotta check with the oil companies.
 
grainfedpraiboy
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Better yet, give the land directly to the individuals and end the system that way.

That will put an immediate end to the graft, corruption and misuse of the land

I used to believe that and also strongly advocated property rights for reserve members as it is the best form of intergenerational wealth transfer going and is at the heart of what makes countries like Canada so much economically better off than countries like Peru.

Having said that, the very basis of being part of a collective is at the heart of most aboriginal societies and imposing one more western value such as individualism will likely lead to more failure.

At the end of the day the option of choices is what is needed most while ndns find themselves and their place and transition over the next several hundred years.
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
+2
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Better yet, give the land directly to the individuals and end the system that way.

That will put an immediate end to the graft, corruption and misuse of the land

That won't happen as long as those in charge are getting rich off the current system. More to the OP, it's pretty easy to turn your back on resource development when you have other revenue streams

Quote: Originally Posted by grainfedpraiboy View Post

Having said that, the very basis of being part of a collective is at the heart of most aboriginal societies and imposing one more western value such as individualism will likely lead to more failure.

I know aboriginals that are every bit as individualistic as I am. If it's wrong to impose our values on them, is it also wrong for them them to impose their values on each other as well?
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+1
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by grainfedpraiboy View Post

Having said that, the very basis of being part of a collective is at the heart of most aboriginal societies and imposing one more western value such as individualism will likely lead to more failure.

The various FN communities have already adopted select Western practices/values. Those in power have the unique ability to pick and choose, however, it comes at the direct expense of many of the folks in their community.

The system is presently broken and there are many that are paying a very steep price for the comfort and enrichment of the few in leadership positions

Quote: Originally Posted by grainfedpraiboy View Post

At the end of the day the option of choices is what is needed most while ndns find themselves and their place and transition over the next several hundred years.

The best option, in my opinion is to deliver an asset to the individual(s) and families. You can't dictate what they do with it, but it is easier to educate people on the options that exist as a result
 
Tecumsehsbones
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

The best option, in my opinion is to deliver an asset to the individual(s) and families. You can't dictate what they do with it, but it is easier to educate people on the options that exist as a result

Good idea. By the time they're done suing each other and the government over the distribution, guess who'll have all the money?

I'm gonna have to start buying my Mercedeses by the six-pack.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#26
So, the plan is to extend the suffering for as long as possible, and when it hits critical mass, then take action?
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

So, the plan is to extend the suffering for as long as possible, and when it hits critical mass, then take action?

That's generally when we can steal the most. . . um. . . help people the most.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

That's generally when we can steal the most. . . um. . . help people the most.


Oh, I know!

Put a 10 million year moratorium on selling the land to anyone other than direct family.

Problem solved
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Oh, I know!

Put a 10 million year moratorium on selling the land to anyone other than direct family.

Problem solved

Good idea. Tell them what they can and cannot do with "their" land.

Don't forget to kidna. . . um. . . educate their kids in residential schools so they can be almost as good as real people.
 
grainfedpraiboy
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

The various FN communities have already adopted select Western practices/values. Those in power have the unique ability to pick and choose, however, it comes at the direct expense of many of the folks in their community.

The system is presently broken and there are many that are paying a very steep price for the comfort and enrichment of the few in leadership positions

The best option, in my opinion is to deliver an asset to the individual(s) and families. You can't dictate what they do with it, but it is easier to educate people on the options that exist as a result

We are probably pretty close on opinion here except that I don't believe it is a good idea to transfer wealth or property to some members of a community that have no idea how handle or manage it having not been raised in that type of culture.

For sure there are many ndns that owning property would be a fantastic foundation to build solid wealth, security and stable families from but many others would be worse off as they squandered it. I have tremendous respect for FNs people but I am not so starry eyed that I don't recognise that a solid majority are incapable at this point in responsibly and effectively managing their own assets and that would have to be addressed.

Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Oh, I know!

Put a 10 million year moratorium on selling the land to anyone other than direct family.

Problem solved

Then you'd have 10 years of unscrupulous family members acquiring extra cheap property.
 

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