Canada's cell phone plans are among the most expensive


Tony The Bot
#1
Canada's cell phone plans are among the most expensive
Posted via Canadian Content

The New America Foundation's Open Technology Initiative has published a report which lists Canada as the most expensive place to own a cell phone. The list compared 11 countries including the US, the UK, Japan among others which found that the countries with the cheapest plans were Hong Kong, Sweden and India.

Canada has topped the list, followed by the United States and the UK.

The average price Canadians paid for voice, text and data plans was US $67.50 with the US a little bit cheaper, but not much at $59.99. Compare that to India where Indians pay an average price of only US $12.90. The same level of service in a first world country like Sweden is considerably cheaper at US $34.05.

“Cost structures and business models undoubtedly vary as a result of the level of competition and innovation in each country,” the OTI report said.

Despite an entry of several new players in the Canadian market, we ended up paying the highest amount for services of which many might consider sub-standard.

In contrast to many other countries in the world such as Asian and European countries, Canadians and Americans pay the cost of both incoming and outgoing voice calls and starting around 5 years ago, most Canadians also pay the cost of incoming text messages.

There's still hope on the horizon, though since 10 months ago Canada saw the first new comer in a decade with the premier of Wind Mobile followed by Mobilicity and Videotron.

The newcomers are mainly no-contract services and the dominating incumbents Bell, Rogers and Telus have either rebranded or launched competing services.


Original Article: http://www.canadiancontent.net/commt...sive_1004.html
 
Praxius
#2
This doesn't surprise me and it's one of the main reasons why I have yet to sign any cell phone contracts in this country. My wife even sees just how bad it is here with costs and contracts that she's still using her Australian cell phone here because their text plan allows her to text anywhere in the world with no penalties that I'm aware of..... try using your Canadian contracted cell phone to make a text message in some other country, let alone another province, and see how much skin they'll peel off you in your next bill.

The only reason why cells are so expensive with crap service here in Canada is simply because we allow it to happen and they know many of us will pay whatever they tell us to pay.
 
JLM
#3
I'm on a "Pay and Talk" plan with Telus and it's definitely a ripoff, but seems not much I can do about it. 99% of my cell phone use is for emergencies and when I'm travelling. I recently was away for 3 days and my total talk time was less than 1 hour which cost me $37. I pay $10 + taxes per month for this service. Since this situation only happens 3 or 4 times a year, it's probably cheaper in the long run than going on another plan, but still I feel ripped off.
 
karrie
#4
“Cost structures and business models undoubtedly vary as a result of the level of competition and innovation in each country,” the OTI report said.

Well, just reading which countries have cheaper plans, I'm going to go out on a limb and say that billable customers per tower is the MAIN difference in the price of the bills. The fact that our cell plans are so similar compared to the much more densely populated US is actually surprising to me.
 
JLM
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

“Cost structures and business models undoubtedly vary as a result of the level of competition and innovation in each country,” the OTI report said.

Well, just reading which countries have cheaper plans, I'm going to go out on a limb and say that billable customers per tower is the MAIN difference in the price of the bills. The fact that our cell plans are so similar compared to the much more densely populated US is actually surprising to me.

I would amend that to "A" difference, my recent use was in Vancouver, where there would be several users on that tower.
 
karrie
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I would amend that to "A" difference, my recent use was in Vancouver, where there would be several users on that tower.

The cell phone company does not pay just for the cell towers in Van though... they pay for the cell towers in BC, so what's the person/tower ratio in all of BC? To provide proper coverage they have to put tower where practiaclly no one lives, as well as where they do.
 
JLM
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

The cell phone company does not pay just for the cell towers in Van though... they pay for the cell towers in BC, so what's the person/tower ratio in all of BC? To provide proper coverage they have to put tower where practiaclly no one lives, as well as where they do.

I didn't realize that towers were that expensive to establish and maintain. Can anyone provide costs?
 
petros
#8
We subsidize the people would never have phones without wireless.$3 a month in some places.


Feel good about yourself. You're helping the poor be connected to family, security and health advice.
 
lindabythewater
#9
OK. I understand it's expensive to live in Canada - few people, big country, expensive infrastructure. But why are roaming charges so expensive? Even in Europe where the rates are lower, roaming charges are extortionate. I always end up getting a local SIM card and airtime, then jump through hoops to get it to work on my unlocked phone.
Quote: Originally Posted by Tony The Bot View Post

Canada's cell phone plans are among the most expensive
Posted via Canadian Content

The New America Foundation's Open Technology Initiative has published a report which lists Canada as the most expensive place to own a cell phone. The list compared 11 countries including the US, the UK, Japan among others which found that the countries with the cheapest plans were Hong Kong, Sweden and India.

Canada has topped the list, followed by the United States and the UK.

The average price Canadians paid for voice, text and data plans was US $67.50 with the US a little bit cheaper, but not much at $59.99. Compare that to India where Indians pay an average price of only US $12.90. The same level of service in a first world country like Sweden is considerably cheaper at US $34.05.

“Cost structures and business models undoubtedly vary as a result of the level of competition and innovation in each country,” the OTI report said.

Despite an entry of several new players in the Canadian market, we ended up paying the highest amount for services of which many might consider sub-standard.

In contrast to many other countries in the world such as Asian and European countries, Canadians and Americans pay the cost of both incoming and outgoing voice calls and starting around 5 years ago, most Canadians also pay the cost of incoming text messages.

There's still hope on the horizon, though since 10 months ago Canada saw the first new comer in a decade with the premier of Wind Mobile followed by Mobilicity and Videotron.

The newcomers are mainly no-contract services and the dominating incumbents Bell, Rogers and Telus have either rebranded or launched competing services.


Original Article: Canada's cell phone plans are among the most expensive

 
Trotz
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

We subsidize the people would never have phones without wireless.$3 a month in some places.


Feel good about yourself. You're helping the poor be connected to family, security and health advice.

It has to be less than that,
because there are African tribals and Somalians who have access to cell phones and they do not even earn an income.

Much like international food aid from the Prairies and the Mid-west are probably feeding 3/4 of this planet (and no doubt feeding our enemies as well).

Unfortunately, even though we do make large incomes in Canada, our CPI indexes are incomparable and through the roof. You can often buy the same identical good, even high end electronics, for fractions of the price in Latin America and Asia. In short, the middle man is ripping us off big time.

The Government knows this, hence there are restrictions in doing things like importing foreign cars. If Government claims it wishes to be a proponent of free trade than I think it's only fair that we should be allowed to purchase goods from abroad without restrictions from customs.

Granted, a Chinese death trap automobile which costs $1100 might not be safe in an accident (I've seen the video clips) it nevertheless would provide a form of transportion for those in Canada who cannot afford an automobile.
 

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