Passengers on grounded Arctic cruise ship to fly out, ice and weather permitting


petros
+3
#1
Ice Free Since 2013...

KUGAARUK, Nunavut -- Dozens of passengers from an Arctic cruise ship that ran aground last week were expected to be flown back south Saturday night, weather and sea ice permitting.

"We're considering it," said Catherine Lawton of One Ocean Expeditions tour company.

"Right now, everything's dependent on weather and ice. What we're trying to do is watch the variables and put possible options in place."

The Akademic Ioffe, operated by One Ocean, ran aground Friday morning in Pelly Bay about 70 kilometres north of Kugaruuk, on the Simpson Peninsula on Canada's eastern Arctic coast.

The ship, a 117-metre ice-strengthened vessel that has made many Arctic cruises, has since been refloated.

"There is some damage to the vessel," said Chris Krepski of the Transportation Safety Board.

Lawton said the ship owners have told her the damage to the hull is "contained and limited."

The Ioffe's 102 passengers and 24 staff have been transferred to the Ioffe's sister ship, the Akademik Sergey Vavilov.

"They picked up all the passengers this morning in search and rescue operations with the Canadian Coast Guard," Cpl. Serge Yelle of the Kugaruuk RCMP detachment said Saturday.

Lawton said there's plenty of room aboard the Vavilov, which has 83 passengers of its own. Onboard programming was continuing Saturday.

If conditions on the ocean remain stable, between 80 and 90 passengers were expected to be flown to Yellowknife Saturday night in a chartered plane. Those remaining from the Ioffe were to spend the night on the Vavilov and will be flown south on Sunday.

The Canadian Coast Guard confirmed Saturday that the icebreaker Canadian Coast Guard Ship Amundsen and its helicopter were at the scene, while a second vessel, Canadian Coast Guard Ship Pierre Radisson, would arrive later in the day.

Coast Guard spokeswoman Lauren Solski said the ship still appears seaworthy despite the accident, although an inspection was underway Saturday.

"It is floating and very stable. No injuries or oil leaks have been reported," said Solski.

Lawton said there had been no report of any environmental concerns.

The tour company said the captain had reported the incident to the relevant federal and territorial agencies.

Krepski said the board hasn't yet decided whether it will send an investigation team to the scene.

"We're following it closely for now," he said.

Solski confirmed travel arrangements for the ship would be determined once the Coast Guard and Transport Canada had finished investigating its condition.

On its website, the tour operator describes the Akademik Ioffe as a "modern, comfortable, safe and ice-strengthened" vessel that can host 96 passengers and 65 staff and crew.

"We regret the inconvenience to our passengers and are working closely with the captain, ship owner and all relevant agencies to resolve the situation as quickly and safely as possible," Lawton said in an earlier statement.

Canada's Arctic seas remain poorly charted.

In 2012, a 200-passenger ship ran aground in the Northwest Passage, although the weather was calm. Everyone was helped off safely.

https://beta.ctvnews.ca/national/can...1_4067789.html
 
MHz
#2
How do you ground a modern ship?
 
petros
+3
#3
Easy, "uncharted sea ice" that been gone in summer for 5 years forcing real time course changes.
 
MHz
#4
You could have just admitted you didn't know.
 
petros
+2
#5
I read the article.

Give it a try. If you run into big words, just ask what they mean.
 
MHz
#6
You forgot to mention who I should ask on the forum.
 
petros
+2
#7
Anyone but Hoid.
 
bill barilko
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

How do you ground a modern ship?

Even in an age where we can fly to the moon oceans contain uncharted rocks-if this vessel had forward looking sonar then maybe this could have been prevented but that technology is rare outside military craft.


$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
 
Curious Cdn
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

How do you ground a modern ship?

You hit a reef/outcropping/shelf/shallows/beach/point/island/wreck/rock ... why would the vessel's modernity make any difference?

They can't lauch those AOPS shops fast enough.
 
MHz
#10
Are you telling me the charts are a white piece of paper? That doesn't seem right. Could there be an 'uplifting that made the charted depth wrong?
Did you see any pic of Russia's newest ice breaker. From the pic available it breaks the ice when the ship is backing up so the heavest part of the ship hits the ice and it just gets turned to mush.
 
Curious Cdn
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Are you telling me the charts are a white piece of paper? That doesn't seem right. Could there be an 'uplifting that made the charted depth wrong?
Did you see any pic of Russia's newest ice breaker. From the pic available it breaks the ice when the ship is backing up so the heavest part of the ship hits the ice and it just gets turned to mush.

Tell us about all that extensive hydrological work that's been done in Arctic waters. How much do you think is charted? 10%? The magic fairies fill in charts?
 
MHz
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

You hit a reef/outcropping/shelf/shallows/beach/point/island/wreck/rock ... why would the vessel's modernity make any difference?

They can't lauch those AOPS shops fast enough.


Up to date charts and GPS navigation should eliminate driving into the ground in open water.



https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ku...4722!4d-89.825


Never mind, it was not 'open water' , nice boat. I wonder if they are interested in fishing in the Bay? Fish and seals can be co-farmed
 
Curious Cdn
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Up to date charts and GPS navigation should eliminate driving into the ground in open water.

"Up-to-date charts" on what is essentially a newly navigable waterway (a large and complex one) do not exist, yet.

What do you think?

Should the Navy and Coast Guard be patrolling and surveying this new frontier? The Navy hasn't been in the Arctic much snce the 1950s. Maybe, there's a connection?

http://youtu.be/fxTab4gh93s
 
MHz
#14
Send in a drone sub capable of hi-rez mapping. There is a lot of coastline in the north, if we can't map it from space then underwater is the next best option. Drones are more suitable than a manned vessel. Since it is some of the oldest rock in the world it could hold the same types of treasures that were found in South Africa. They are running out of gold.


If you are in uncharted how can you even insure a boat if you are navigating blindly?
With the right hi-tech clothing life at -40C is still possible. It is too cold for it to even snow. Welcome to Mars
 
Danbones
#15
In a bay like that I bet the tides are pretty varied.
We just had the full moon


Spring Tides
When the moon is full or new, the gravitational pull of the moon and sun are combined. At these times, the high tides are very high and the low tides are very low.
The Moon And Tides

there is your trouble. That's why the boat is now afloat.
 
Walter
+2
#16
Stoopid global warming causing all that ice.
 
Curious Cdn
+1 / -1
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Stoopid global warming causing all that ice.

No, stupid global warming caused passenger cruise ships to be sailing in waters that were inaccessible a couple of decades ago.
 
pgs
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

No, stupid global warming caused passenger cruise ships to be sailing in waters that were inaccessible a couple of decades ago.

When did the RCMP boat the St. Roche sail through the northwest passage ?
 
Curious Cdn
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

When did the RCMP boat the St. Roche sail through the northwest passage ?

During WWII and the trip took over two years (1940-42) because they had to winter over twice. It's an interesting story that you should read up on, pigs. What it is not is a history of accessibility in Arctic waters. It is quite the opposite.
 
Walter
#20
The SS Manhattan made the trip in August 1969.
 
Danbones
+1
#21
I thought the nazi propagandists lost WW2.

Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

No, stupid global warming caused passenger cruise ships to be sailing in waters that were inaccessible a couple of decades ago.

This is why global warming is now climate change.

Research ship trapped in Antarctic ice because of weather, not climate change
Rapid build up of ice that trapped the research vessel Academik Shokalskiy tells us very little about global warming
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...climate-change

Large Canadian Arctic climate change study cancelled due to climate change
Date:
June 13, 2017
Source:
University of Manitoba
Summary:
The Science Team of the Canadian Research Icebreaker CCGS Amundsen has cancelled the first leg of the 2017 Expedition due to complications associated with the southward motion of hazardous Arctic sea ice, caused by climate change
https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0613150651.htm

Scott and Shackleton logbooks prove Antarctic sea ice is not shrinking 100 years after expeditions
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...not-shrinking/


LoL, YOU are so FUNNY, that's why I come here!
 
MHz
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

there is your trouble. That's why the boat is now afloat.

I can buy that.

In the winter why not keep the tourism going by using cats to pull ATCO trailers that are turned into big bob-sleds. The 2nd cat hauls a fuel sloop only. (good for about 2 weeks)
Prospectors/tourists could have a shack hauled out to a spot and left there while they scout the area next summer. We already now there are diamonds near Yellowknife. I doubt anybody has even documented the different rocks in the Baffin Is cliffs let alone the rest of the north.

Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

The SS Manhattan made the trip in August 1969.

Isn't that the way most communities in the north get their supplies? By air in the winter is too expensive and too much material is needed. Rather than icebreakers when the ice is getting thicker this would allow for supplies in the winter as well as being able to go up any inlet winter or summer.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Inog40YZcYs
 
pgs
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

During WWII and the trip took over two years (1940-42) because they had to winter over twice. It's an interesting story that you should read up on, pigs. What it is not is a history of accessibility in Arctic waters. It is quite the opposite.

You should thank me for broadening your horizons .
 
MHz
#24
Want to bet they decided it was nice and quiet there compared to sailing around the North Sea where the U-boats were sinking whatever they wanted.
 
pgs
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

You should thank me for broadening your horizons .

P.S. if you really want to know she was the first vessel to sail the northwest passage in a single season . There is a museum on Seperly Point , were she is open for viewing . Pretty much right on top of the old Kitsalano Indian village .
 
MHz
#26
Please tell me the people were moved to new quarters before it became 'old'.
 
bill barilko
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

P.S. if you really want to know she was the first vessel to sail the northwest passage in a single season . There is a museum on Seperly Point , were she is open for viewing . Pretty much right on top of the old Kitsalano Indian village .

Ceperley Point is in Stanley Park-the St Roche is in the Maritime Museum which is in Hadden Park in Kitsilano-I swim there twice a day.
 
Curious Cdn
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

The SS Manhattan made the trip in August 1969.

...escorted by BIG icebreakers who broke her out on a few occasions. Also, the Manhattan never sailed again and went to the breakers because the trip had stressed her hull out of spec. Disposible 250,000 ton super tankers are not on.

Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilko View Post

Ceperley Point is in Stanley Park-the St Roche is in the Maritime Museum which is in Hadden Park in Kitsilano-I swim there twice a day.

Been on her.

Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

You should thank me for broadening your horizons .

That'll be the foggy feckin' Friday.
 
Walter
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

...escorted by BIG icebreakers who broke her out on a few occasions. Also, the Manhattan never sailed again and went to the breakers because the trip had stressed her hull out of spec. Disposible 250,000 ton super tankers are not on.

Stoopid tour boat should’ve had ice breakers, too.
 
Curious Cdn
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Stoopid tour boat should’ve had ice breakers, too.

Yup. The Navy has one ready to launch, one half built and a third one with the keel laid. They are not heavy icebreakers but they are more capable than the cruise ships up there. We need to patrol these waters all of the time, now.
 

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