#metoo

Colpy
+6
#1  Top Rated Post
Odd things I encountered on the internet.


Is everyone aware that the # symbol actually means "pound"?


So the line added to tweets that looks like this: #metoo should correctly be read as "Pound Me Too"


I do not think that is what they had in mind.



LOL

.
 
DaSleeper
+2
#2
Used to be the symbol for tic tac toe
 
Danbones
+1
#3
Nothing makes a nonmale madder then not getting pounded when (!) wants to get pounded.

unless there are some pounds involved...or they are from the pound...or have too many pounds.
 
Corduroy
#4
It's amazing how quickly this symbol has evolved. It's like every generation has a different meaning. I've met people who have no idea it's the number symbol, and I only vaguely recognize it as 'pound'.
 
petros
#5
You don't use voice mail?

"Enter your password followed by the pound key."
 
Corduroy
#6
My voicemail just says "Please enter your password".
 
Colpy
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Corduroy View Post

It's amazing how quickly this symbol has evolved. It's like every generation has a different meaning. I've met people who have no idea it's the number symbol, and I only vaguely recognize it as 'pound'.

My son informed me it is actually called a "octothorpe"

%^$ing know-it-all.

 
petros
#8
Please enter a new extension, followed by pound.

#sand
 
Corduroy
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Colpy View Post

My son informed me it is actually called a "octothorpe"

%^$ing know-it-all.


Octo? What does it have 8 of? Not lines, not boxes...
 
petros
#10
An octopus has more than eight parts.
 
Colpy
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Corduroy View Post

Octo? What does it have 8 of? Not lines, not boxes...

#

If you consider the central parallelogram separately, it has 8 linear protrusions.

LOL.

That sounds awfully convoluted for a simple concept.
 
Kreskin
+1
#12
Hash, me too!
 
Danbones
+1
#13
Yes apparently the new sex robots are good in the kitchen too.

If you like your weiners cooked...( lol, not just their gooses), that is.

..and they say robots will never tell, (unless they have been hacked!)
 
Kreskin
#14
Do people still smoke hash?
 
Colpy
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Kreskin View Post

Do people still smoke hash?

Yes.
 
Ishacat
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Colpy View Post

Odd things I encountered on the internet.


Is everyone aware that the # symbol actually means "pound"?


So the line added to tweets that looks like this: #metoo should correctly be read as "Pound Me Too"


I do not think that is what they had in mind.



LOL

.

It’s also a numerical symbol.
 
Corduroy
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Colpy View Post

#

If you consider the central parallelogram separately, it has 8 linear protrusions.

LOL.

That sounds awfully convoluted for a simple concept.

You mean it has 4 lines and each line has 2 ends so 8 points around?

I guess it's necessary to have this symbol that has no necessary function but can be reused to suit the times.
 
Walter
#18
As always, the unintended consequences will cause a lot of crap.
#MediocrityToo
https://www.city-journal.org/html/me...too-15705.html
 
spaminator
+1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Colpy View Post

Odd things I encountered on the internet.


Is everyone aware that the # symbol actually means "pound"?


So the line added to tweets that looks like this: #metoo should correctly be read as "Pound Me Too"


I do not think that is what they had in mind.



LOL

.

wonder if the word caucus will be banned?
 
spaminator
#20
Toronto's 'Pussy Hut' pays tribute to women’s movement symbol with massive tuque
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
February 21, 2018
Updated:
February 21, 2018 12:28 PM EST
A pink toque inspired"'Pussy Hut" is pictured on Toronto's beach Wednesday February 21, 2018. A massive pink toque has taken over a stretch of a Toronto beach a year after thousands of protesters donned bright pink hats to protest gender inequality.Chris Young / THE CANADIAN PRESS
TORONTO — A massive pink tuque has taken over a stretch of a Toronto beach a year after thousands of protesters donned bright pink hats to protest gender inequality.
Dubbed the “Pussy Hut,” the warm-and-fuzzy attraction is inspired by the colourful symbol of women’s marches that emerged after last year’s inauguration of U.S. President Donald Trump.
The art piece is part of an annual competition called Winter Stations staged along Lake Ontario in the city’s east-end.
Organizers say this year’s theme is “Riot” and that they chose to include the “Pussy Hut” for its message of hope.
“These are changing times and ‘riot’ is an expressive way of demonstrating that there’s change in the air,” says one of the competition’s directors, Ted Merrick of the Toronto architectural firm Ferris + Associates.
A pink toque inspired Pussy Hut is pictured on Toronto’s beach Wednesday February 21, 2018. A massive pink toque has taken over a stretch of a Toronto beach a year after thousands of protesters donned bright pink hats to protest gender inequality. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
“It can also be a riot of colour, it can be kind, it can respond to political climates around the world, it can respond to just the change in the world these days, so we thought it an appropriate theme.”
The “Pussy Hut” is large enough to allow several people under its roof, and includes earflaps that slope onto a wooden bench where visitors can sit.
It’s covered with bright pink fabric tubes stuffed with polyester fibre fill to create the 12-centimetre-wide “yarn.” That was then positioned over a structure built of milled plywood.
Designers Martin Miller and Mo Zheng, based in New York and China, hope visitors will be drawn to the large-scale art piece to share stories and discuss a raft of political and societal movements underway.
Women with bright pink hats and signs begin to gather early and are set to make their voices heard on the first full day of Donald Trump’s presidency, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017 in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Zheng says she was delighted to see several people unable to resist touching the “yarn” when the piece debuted over the weekend.
“Actually, a lot of kids were climbing on that and they really, really enjoy it,” says Zheng, who notes that some observers simply see a familiar winter symbol, without political overtones.
“The texture is just very different — it’s not your conventional kind of outdoor art installation. The material is (such) that people want to touch it and start sitting on it.”
The hut rises a little over four metres tall and involves about 1,200 metres of “yarn.”
Inside, there are shelves where people can share their own feelings about gender inequity and sexual harassment.
“People are welcome to leave messages and notes about their particular experiences, their experience with the women’s movement, the women’s march and leave little relics and artifacts,” says Miller.
Other chosen installations include megaphones in a “noisebox” from Germany and spinning pinwheels to celebrate clean and safe energy from the Netherlands.
The exhibit runs until April 1.

Toronto’s ‘Pussy Hut’ pays tribute to women
 
Mowich
+1
#21
Christie Blatchford: Unlike Canada, U.K. has learned sex assault 'victims' aren't always victims

Hooray for Cressida Dick, the commissioner of the Metropolitan Police in London, who has formally led her force in abandoning its policy of automatically believing victims of sexual assault.

As The Times of London reported Monday, since taking over the Met about a year ago, Dick has told her officers that of course they are to keep an open mind, treat complainants with respect and dignity and “we should listen to them. We should record what they say.”

But, Dick said, “From that moment on, we are investigators.”

What seems so elementary — that the first job of police isn’t to “support” victims or anyone else, but rather to investigate complaints — got lost in 2014, when the notional acceptance of victims as inherently “being truthful” went to a flat-out recommendation that “The presumption that a victim should always be believed should be institutionalized.”

This “we believe” mindset was in part responsible for the Operation Midland scandal, which saw a number of prominent men ruined (though never criminally charged) by allegations they were involved in a VIP pedophile ring, all on the say-so of a single alleged victim known as “Nick.”

That was the finding of a report into Operation Midland by retired high court judge Sir Richard Henriques, who found that the presumption of innocence was “set aside” by detectives in their eagerness, and what they felt was their duty, to believe Nick.

Henriques said this protocol of automatically believing victims “perverts our system of justice, strikes at the very core of the criminal justice process, will generate miscarriages of justice on a considerable scale,” and should be scrapped. And scrapped, thanks to Dick, it has been.

Henriques went even further, and rued the use of the word “victim” in U.K. legislation and said, “since the investigative process is similarly engaged in ascertaining facts which will, if proven, establish guilt, the use of the word ‘victim’ at the commencement of an investigation is simply inaccurate and should cease.”

Interestingly, there was another development Monday in U.K. justice, with the director of public prosecutions, Alison Saunders, reported to be stepping down when her five-year contract ends next fall.

The announcement of her resignation came after several recent rape trials collapsed when prosecutors apparently failed to disclose evidence — much of it text messages — to the defence, as they’re obliged to do, just as Canadian prosecutors are. The Crown Prosecution Service is now reviewing all current rape cases.

In Canada, meantime, the pendulum continues to swing the other way.

Despite huge pushback from defence lawyers and legal organizations, Bill C-51 is almost but not quite law — having passed in the House and on its way to second reading in the Senate.

It’s this bill, colloquially known as the new Ghomeshi rules, which expands the definition of sexual activity to include communications made “for a sexual purpose or whose content is of a sexual nature.”

As the Canadian Bar Association said in a letter to the justice committee which, last fall, was studying the bill, the amendments mean that “an accused with records that could impeach complainants or witnesses” can’t use those records unless they first get a judge’s OK.

It was precisely this sort of communication — emails from the complainants to the accused — that was used so effectively in cross-examination by Ghomeshi’s main lawyer, Marie Henein.

What these messages showed in the case of all three complainants was that despite their testimony in court that after their alleged attacks they were so traumatized and wary they never saw Ghomeshi again except in public, they had all either tried to (in one instance) and/or actually done so.

In one instance, the complainant forgot to disclose to police or prosecutors that she’d had dinner, post-alleged attack, with Ghomeshi, taken him home in a cab and given him a hand job and, in the other, the complainant had actively courted him for about a year after the purported assault, once telling him she had wanted to “—- your brains out” on the very night of the alleged assault.

In other words, the messages revealed that there were great gaps between what the complainants told the judge (and before him, police and prosecutors) and their private messages to Ghomeshi.

As Ottawa lawyer Michael Spratt wrote for Canadian Lawyer magazine last year, as C-51 was introduced, and this was about 15 months after Ghomeshi was acquitted, “People did not like that.

“So now, if the defence has a record that shows the complainant is lying or misrepresenting the evidence, that record must be disclosed in advance.

“A lawyer is then appointed for the complainant, who is granted standing to argue for suppression of the defence evidence.

“In other words, the legislation will tip off a liar that records exist exposing their lie and then gives them a chance to come up with an explanation.”

Worth noting is that at the time Ghomeshi was charged, the Toronto Police sex crimes unit was headed by a woman, Insp. Joanna Beaven-Desjardins, who deeply believed all complainants from the get-go.

As she put it at a press conference announcing that three (later discredited) women had come forward with allegations against Ghomeshi, “We believe victims when they come in, 100 per cent. We are behind them 100 per cent … We believe them right from the onset.”

“We” were on the wrong track.

It was, for the record, a lousy investigation, the complainants only minimally and tepidly questioned, and never challenged, of course, lest they have felt disrespected or, God forbid, disbelieved.

Christie Blatchford: Unlike Canada, U.K. has learned sex assault ‘victims’ aren’t always victims | National Post
 
White_Unifier
+1
#22
So if a woman accuses a man of sexually assaulting her and he counter-accuses her of having sexually assaulted him, do the Ghomeshi rules apply to both?
 
Mowich
+1
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

So if a woman accuses a man of sexually assaulting her and he counter-accuses her of having sexually assaulted him, do the Ghomeshi rules apply to both?

Hmmn.........interesting question WU. I have no idea. However, considering our current excuse for a government appears bent on changing the rules to benefit women - victim or not - I doubt it.
 
White_Unifier
+1
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Hmmn.........interesting question WU. I have no idea. However, considering our current excuse for a government appears bent on changing the rules to benefit women - victim or not - I doubt it.

That's an important question since I remember reading something like that from the US a few years ago. The woman accused the man of having sexually assaulted her and he turned around to say that no, not only did he not sexually assault her but that she in fact had sexually assaulted him. I don't know how that case turned out, but I'm sure you can see how 'rape shield' laws can get really muddy in such a scenario.
 
Mowich
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

That's an important question since I remember reading something like that from the US a few years ago. The woman accused the man of having sexually assaulted her and he turned around to say that no, not only did he not sexually assault her but that she in fact had sexually assaulted him. I don't know how that case turned out, but I'm sure you can see how 'rape shield' laws can get really muddy in such a scenario.

Expect they will get a whole hell of a lot 'muddier' here in Canada, WU.
 
White_Unifier
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Expect they will get a whole hell of a lot 'muddier' here in Canada, WU.

Well if we follow rape shield laws to their logical conclusion, then if A accuses B of having sexually assaulted A and B not only denies this but then counter-accuses A of having sexually assaulted B, then technically both should be protected from rape shield laws. Then if the judge can't ask either party too many questions, then how is he to get to the bottom of it?

Worse yet, I can definitely see a lawyer using rape shield laws themselves as a defense. For example, A rapes B and then accuses B of raping A. B counters in his defense that A raped him and then accused him of raping her as a way to benefit from rape shield laws as a preemptive tactic in case he made a criminal complaint against her.

All fine up to that point. But what happens if B in fact did rape A, A makes a criminal complaint, and B then says that A raped him and then made the complaint as a pre-emptive tactic for protection against rape shield laws. Suddenly the judge starts to have doubts about whether A might really have raped B and then had a legal motive to accuse B. Suddenly, rape shield laws backfire against the very person they were to protect.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Hmmn.........interesting question WU. I have no idea. However, considering our current excuse for a government appears bent on changing the rules to benefit women - victim or not - I doubt it.

That's OK, Robin Camp stands foursquare for blaming the victim.

Reminds me of a time in Boston a while back. A man shot his wife to death in the car, then shot himself in the leg, and told the cops "A black man did it."

The Boston cops rousted 5000 black men before somebody thought to check his story.

So, no, it's not just female victims of sexual assault who enjoy the presumption of truthfulness.
 
White_Unifier
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

That's OK, Robin Camp stands foursquare for blaming the victim.

Reminds me of a time in Boston a while back. A man shot his wife to death in the car, then shot himself in the leg, and told the cops "A black man did it."

The Boston cops rousted 5000 black men before somebody thought to check his story.

So, no, it's not just female victims of sexual assault who enjoy the presumption of truthfulness.

Hey, you're a lawyer. So, if A rapes B and then accuses A of raping B, and B not only denies the accusation but then counter-accuses A of raping B, do rape shield laws apply to both? How does that work?
 
Tecumsehsbones
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

Hey, you're a lawyer. So, if A rapes B and then accuses A of raping B, and B not only denies the accusation but then counter-accuses A of raping B, do rape shield laws apply to both? How does that work?

Rape shield laws apply only at trial, and they vary state by state. If you want a full summary, it'll cost you $850 an hour.

The short answer is the rape shield laws would only apply in the trial where one was the accused and the other the victim. That's free.

Quote: Originally Posted by Colpy View Post

Odd things I encountered on the internet.


Is everyone aware that the # symbol actually means "pound"?


So the line added to tweets that looks like this: #metoo should correctly be read as "Pound Me Too"


I do not think that is what they had in mind.



LOL

.

It doesn't "actually mean 'pound'". Some countries and groups use it to mean pound. Others use it to mean "numbers."

The British call it "hash," as in "Enter your number and press 'hash'."

Presumably that's where the term "hashtag" came from.

The British also call the "slant" or "slash" mark (/) the "stroke." As in "My birthdate is 02 stroke 02 stroke 1977."
 
Mowich
#30
Not an auspicious start for the Weinstein trial.

"Disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein has asked a New York judge to dismiss multiple sexual assault charges against him, according to a motion filed Friday by his attorney.

In the 159-page motion, Weinstein's lawyer Benjamin Brafman argues that the Manhattan district attorney withheld “exculpatory evidence” from a grand jury that indicted the movie mogul, who faces six charges, including rape in the first and third degrees. The motion cites “more than 400 warm, complimentary and solicitous” emails between Weinstein and an unnamed woman accusing him of raping her in 2013.

According to the court filing court filing, the emails were sent between April 2013 and February 2017, a period that followed the alleged rape. The motion includes dozens of emails, including one allegedly sent on February 8, 2017, in which the unnamed woman tells Weinstein, “I love you, always do. But I hate feeling like a booty call.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.3a9f69f82cb2
 

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