Black Canadians and Black Americans are two separate groups of people,


B00Mer
#1
Justin Bieber sings N-word, jokes about being in KKK

But it Okay; “N***** doesn’t mean anything in Canada,” she said. “Black Canadians and Black Americans are two separate groups of people.”



TORONTO — Justin Bieber is once again under fire for using the N-word in a video.

The clip, which was posted on TMZ, follows one in which the Canadian pop star told a racist joke.

The latest video, recorded at least five years ago, shows Bieber singing his hit “One Less Lonely Girl” but he replaces the last word with the N-word.

He repeats it three times and then sings: “There’s going to be one less lonely n**** if I kill you.”

The singer adds “I’ll be part of the KKK” before using the N-word two more times.

UK tabloid The Sun claims it received an apology from Bieber for the latest video.

“Facing my mistakes from years ago has been one of the hardest things I’ve ever dealt with,” he reportedly said, “but I feel now that I need to take responsibility for those mistakes and not let them linger. At the end of the day, I just need to step up and own what I did.”

The newspaper said Bieber, now 20, called it a “childish and inexcusable mistake.”

The View host Whoopi Goldberg defended Bieber’s use of the N-word.

“N***** doesn’t mean anything in Canada,” she said. “Black Canadians and Black Americans are two separate groups of people.”


Goldberg later took to Twitter to clarify. “Canadians, I was saying the N word is not something that lived in Canada the way it lived here, part of American history.”

Source: Justin Bieber sings N-word, jokes about being in KKK | Globalnews.ca
 
Sal
#2
I know he's not well educated, but where are his handlers?
 
Twila
+3
#3  Top Rated Post
Where's Whoopies head at? This is the second thing I've read from her that is just so out there. The other was that "I know it wasn't rape-rape. I think it was something else, but I don't believe it was rape-rape." in reference to the Roman Polanski rape charge.

Its a weird reality she lives in that the N word is only derogatory in the USA and that there is rape and then rape rape.
 
B00Mer
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

Where's Whoopies head at? This is the second thing I've read from her that is just so out there. The other was that "I know it wasn't rape-rape. I think it was something else, but I don't believe it was rape-rape." in reference to the Roman Polanski rape charge.

Its a weird reality she lives in that the N word is only derogatory in the USA and that there is rape and then rape rape.

Has she moved to Colorado?
 
Twila
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Has she moved to Colorado?

I don't know anything about Colorado other then they have some great hikes and pot. Pot is not going to help her get her head on straight.
 
B00Mer
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

I don't know anything about Colorado other then they have some great hikes and pot. Pot is not going to help her get her head on straight.

Nope, but it may make her a little "out of her head"

By the way.. I just picked up a load there on Tuesday in Gypsum, CO back to Arlington, TX.

Here are some photos of that drive - amazing country.





 
Twila
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Nope, but it may make her a little "out of her head"

By the way.. I just picked up a load there on Tuesday in Gypsum, CO back to Arlington, TX.

Here are some photos of that drive - amazing country.





no picture is showing. Please fix. Maybe out of her head would provide her with a better perspective on things...
 
spilledthebeer
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

no picture is showing. Please fix. Maybe out of her head would provide her with a better perspective on things...


Black Yankees and Black Cdns REALLY ARE two different groups of people!!!!!!


Black Yankee Alonzo Botyd shows up at Montreal Comedy Festival- gets up ob stage and says: "its a unique experience for me to be here in Montreal- where there are so many Black people who actually WANTED to come here"!



Black Cdns mostly make their own trouble!!!!!

 
Bar Sinister
#9
Goldberg might be right. I can understand African Canadians without using subtitles.
 
Curious Cdn
#10
White Canadians and White Americans are increasingly two separate groups of people, too,

We are diverging rapidly, right at this moment.
 
taxslave
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

White Canadians and White Americans are increasingly two separate groups of people, too,

We are diverging rapidly, right at this moment.

Very true. There are those of us that like Canada's and those that like TrudOWE. No middle ground there.
 
pgs
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Very true. There are those of us that like Canada's and those that like TrudOWE. No middle ground there.

Yes here we are living in the richest country in the world with the most educated workforce in history and we can’t even cover our operating expenses .
 
Danbones
+1
#13
budgets balance themselves

unless someone is stealing the place blind.
 
OpposingDigit
#14
Canada's slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavement
Hiding two centuries of slavery requires some effort, and it is a collective silence that historian Afua Cooper calls the 'erasure of blackness.'
Why is it common knowledge that we saved runaway slaves from the United States, but few know that Africans and Indigenous peoples were bought, sold and exploited, right here?
In part one of a two-part series, contributor Kyle G. Brown asks how slavery was allowed to continue for some 200 years, and be one of the least talked about aspects of our history.
----The 'erasure of blackness'----
Canada's towns, parks and universities are abound with statues and street signs that have immortalized our "founding fathers." But there is no sign of the men, women and children that some of these powerful men enslaved.
Small wonder then, that many of us today are unaware that Indigenous and African peoples were forced into bondage across colonial Canada.
Hiding two centuries of slavery requires some effort, and it is a collective silence that historian Afua Cooper calls the "erasure of blackness."
There's perhaps no better symbol of erasure than an invisible cemetery.
----An invisible cemetery----
Every year the Black Coalition of Quebec organizes a grim pilgrimage to an unmarked grave. About an hour from Montreal outside the village of Saint Armand, close to a dozen slaves are said to be buried near a large whale-shaped boulder.
Little is known of the people enslaved by the Luke family — loyalists who fled the United States in the 1780s. And while the family cemetery still stands — its tombstones bent with age — their slaves left behind a trail of disappearing clues.
Ploughing these fields in the 1950s, a farmer's tractor ground to a halt — on human bones. Elsewhere, they might have been studied and carefully preserved. But these remains were tossed aside and lost.
Oral history has it that they are the bones of the Luke family slaves. This is backed by the preliminary findings of Quebec anthropologist Roland Viau.
Once pointing to these vast rolling fields was a sign that read "Negro Cemetery." It too is now gone. The sign was removed, replaced, and removed again, as though to extirpate the remnants of an embarrassing past.
Beyond the thick woods of Saint Armand, our history has been camouflaged across the country. ​
"Canadian slavery transpires over 200 plus years."
--Charmaine Nelson, McGill Professor of Art History--
Slavery is seldom featured in Canadian museums, except to extol the virtues of Canadians who helped runaways escaping north. The theme gets short shrift even at a museum named after the owner of at least 17 slaves: François Baby House in Windsor.
A 19th century Upper Canada official, François Baby is among hundreds of slave owners listed in the Dictionnaire des Esclaves by late historian Marcel Trudel.
Conventional texts tell at length of the swashbuckling heroes of colonial conquest, but say little of the people they colonized and enslaved.
Or they showcase the Underground Railroad — networks of activists who provided safe houses to those fleeing plantations in the American south for free states and colonial Canada, where slavery was abolished by the British Empire in 1833.
The Railroad then lasted some 30 years, succeeding a longer and less glorious era.
"Canadian slavery transpires over 200 plus years," says Charmaine Nelson, an art history professor at McGill University. "So what does it take to erase 200 years of history from the collective consciousness of a nation, but to enshrine three decades?"
----Slavery is Canada's best-kept secret----
Canada has burnished its reputation as the Railroad's central station, the saviour of runaway slaves. Generations of Canadians have grown up with the idea that slavery somehow stopped at the American border. As we hear, a surprised former prime minister never knew it happened here. Another former PM said famously that Canada has "no history of colonialism."
As Afua Cooper says, slavery is Canada's best-kept secret.
What Nelson calls our "strategic ignorance," harks all the way back to slave-owners themselves, whose selective diaries were replete with euphemisms like "servants" and extended family.
The slaves themselves were silenced. They worked so hard that they died at 20 years old or so. If ever they had time to collect their thoughts, they could scarcely record them for posterity. Masters often prohibited them from speaking their own languages. They stripped them of their original African and Indigenous names, and assigned French and English names, effectively wiping out their identity.
Now a small but growing number of scholars is unearthing court records, local registries and a host of archives to get a glimpse into the less luminous chambers of our past.
Thanks to a new generation of historians — building on the work of pioneers like James Walker and Marcel Trudel — at least part of the injurious erasure is being reversed.
----Additional note: A word on 'Canada'----
This documentary chronicles slavery as it occurred "in Canada" prior to Confederation and refers to the birthplace of Canada or colonial Canada. Since the 16th century, settlers, officials and historians have used the term "Canada" — often interchangeably with other names, from New France and British North America to Upper Canada and Lower Canada.
CBC - Ideas
Host Paul Kennedy
Guests:
Afua Cooper
Brett Rushforth
Camille Turner
Charmaine Nelson
George Elliott Clarke
Michael Farkas
June 28, 2018
CBC Radio - Ideas
https://www.dal.ca/faculty/arts/soci...ua-cooper.html
https://history.uoregon.edu/profile/bhru
camille turner
https://www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/people-co...faculty/nelson
https://lop.parl.ca/About/Parliament...ureate7-e.html
Clarke
http://s//moishistoiredesnoirs.com/e...t-du-president
https://liguedesnoirs.org/en
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montr...tion-1.3787740
https://www.citywindsor.ca/residents...aby-House.aspx
https://www.amazon.com/Dictionnaire-.../dp/2890458334
https://www.reuters.com/article/colu...58P05Z20090926
Part I of II
(Flash Audio)
Canada's slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavement | CBC Radio
Part II of II
Slavery's long shadow: The impact of 200 years enslavement in Canada
Is there a connection between the enslavement of African-Canadians and their overwhelming presence in the criminal justice system today? The United Nations has sounded the alarm on anti-black racism in Canada, stating it can be traced back to slavery and its legacy. In Part 2 of this series on slavery in colonial Canada, Kyle G. Brown explores the long-lasting ramifications of one of humanity's most iniquitous institutions.
For years, activists have been demanding reparations for centuries of injustice — which they say didn't end with abolition.
----The many faces of racism----
From racial slurs to microaggressions, racism remains entrenched in Canadian society, and its root cause may reach further back than we think.
In Nova Scotia alone in recent years, there has been a cross-burning on the lawn of a mixed race couple, racist graffiti on the campaign signs of minority candidates in provincial elections and a noose tied to a black teacher's classroom door.
Figures released last year revealed that hate crimes across the country rose for three years in a row, with crimes targeting black populations being the most common.
For historians like Afua Cooper at Dalhousie University in Halifax, these phenomena are all part of the legacy of slavery in colonial Canada.
"What slavery did in Canada was it made [the concept of] race," she says. "If we are looking at one of the legacies of slavery in Canada, it made white people white and black people black. And in doing so, it created black inferiority, black subjugation, white supremacy and white hegemony that we are still living with to this day."
A number of measures casts this inequality into sharp relief. In Ontario, black women are likelier than whites to be unemployed, despite having higher levels of education. Black children are more likely to be in foster care.
----'Policing arose out of slave patrols'----
Investigations of the Toronto and Halifax police forces found that African-Canadians are stopped and searched three times more often than white Canadians.
"Black people are being surveilled and over-policed and carded at a rate that is disproportionate to other people, especially white citizens."
--Charmaine Nelson--
Some historians trace this trend back to slavery and segregation.
"Policing arose out of slave patrols," says Professor of Art History at McGill University, Charmaine Nelson. "Black people are being surveilled and over-policed and carded at a rate that is disproportionate to other people, especially white citizens."
"So we're still subjected to a heightened surveillance on the basis of our race, and where does that come from? This is slavery," she says. "How do you think they could catch fugitives, if not to have networks of people who were willing to put their necks on the line to catch people for a reward?"
A 2017 report by the United Nations Human Rights Working group called on Canada to recognize the lasting damage done by slavery and segregation.
It said these systems "lie at the core" of persistent, structural racism, which took hold in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. French settlers and white Loyalists fleeing the American Revolution, received plum political posts and large land grants, and their wealth and influence passed down from generation to generation. Most of the first black people living in colonial Canada were enslaved, and even after abolition, they were landless and poor.
Post abolition it was the slave-owners, not the slaves, who were awarded compensation — for "lost property." The ramifications of both the trauma of slavery and the massive wealth gap it created have reverberated across the generations.
Campaigners demand compensation to address the deep socio-economic divide. And in early 2018, black history experts told a Senate Committee on Human Rights that the government should apologize and pay reparations to descendants of slaves. This gesture, they say, would pave the way for the kind of reconciliation that has begun with First Nations.
Canadian governments have issued apologies and compensation to LGBTQ communities, victims of Japanese internment and families affected by the Chinese Head Tax.
Ottawa has yet to respond to demands by slaves' descendants for reparations.
Host Paul Kennedy
Guests:
Afua Cooper
Brett Rushforth
Camille Turner
Charmaine Nelson
Cikiah Thomas
George Elliott Clarke
Natasha Henry
Vanessa Fells
July 05, 2018
CBC Radio - Ideas
http://www.dal.ca/faculty/arts/socio...ua-cooper.html
http://history.uoregon.edu/profile/bhru
camille turner
http://www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/people-con...faculty/nelson
https://www.facebook.com/Global-Afri...l-116805252888
http://lop.parl.ca/About/Parliament/...ureate7-e.html
Clarke
Ontario Black History - Home
| Black Loyalist Heritage Society
N.S. man guilty of hate crime in cross-burning | CBC News
N.S. couple shaken by cross burning | CBC News
UPDATE: Election signs defaced with racist graffiti on election day | The Chronicle Herald
South Shore Regional School Board deals with racially charged incidents | CBC News
https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/dail...71128d-eng.htm
A/HRC/36/60/Add.1 - E
https://sencanada.ca/en/sencaplus/ne...gy-reparations
(Flash Audio)
Slavery's long shadow: The impact of 200 years enslavement in Canada | CBC Radio

Canada's slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavement
Hiding two centuries of slavery requires some effort, and it is a collective silence that historian Afua Cooper calls the 'erasure of blackness.'
Why is it common knowledge that we saved runaway slaves from the United States, but few know that Africans and Indigenous peoples were bought, sold and exploited, right here?
In part one of a two-part series, contributor Kyle G. Brown asks how slavery was allowed to continue for some 200 years, and be one of the least talked about aspects of our history.
----The 'erasure of blackness'----
Canada's towns, parks and universities are abound with statues and street signs that have immortalized our "founding fathers." But there is no sign of the men, women and children that some of these powerful men enslaved.
Small wonder then, that many of us today are unaware that Indigenous and African peoples were forced into bondage across colonial Canada.
Hiding two centuries of slavery requires some effort, and it is a collective silence that historian Afua Cooper calls the "erasure of blackness."
There's perhaps no better symbol of erasure than an invisible cemetery.
----An invisible cemetery----
Every year the Black Coalition of Quebec organizes a grim pilgrimage to an unmarked grave. About an hour from Montreal outside the village of Saint Armand, close to a dozen slaves are said to be buried near a large whale-shaped boulder.
Little is known of the people enslaved by the Luke family — loyalists who fled the United States in the 1780s. And while the family cemetery still stands — its tombstones bent with age — their slaves left behind a trail of disappearing clues.
Ploughing these fields in the 1950s, a farmer's tractor ground to a halt — on human bones. Elsewhere, they might have been studied and carefully preserved. But these remains were tossed aside and lost.
Oral history has it that they are the bones of the Luke family slaves. This is backed by the preliminary findings of Quebec anthropologist Roland Viau.
Once pointing to these vast rolling fields was a sign that read "Negro Cemetery." It too is now gone. The sign was removed, replaced, and removed again, as though to extirpate the remnants of an embarrassing past.
Beyond the thick woods of Saint Armand, our history has been camouflaged across the country. ​
"Canadian slavery transpires over 200 plus years."
--Charmaine Nelson, McGill Professor of Art History--
Slavery is seldom featured in Canadian museums, except to extol the virtues of Canadians who helped runaways escaping north. The theme gets short shrift even at a museum named after the owner of at least 17 slaves: François Baby House in Windsor.
A 19th century Upper Canada official, François Baby is among hundreds of slave owners listed in the Dictionnaire des Esclaves by late historian Marcel Trudel.
Conventional texts tell at length of the swashbuckling heroes of colonial conquest, but say little of the people they colonized and enslaved.
Or they showcase the Underground Railroad — networks of activists who provided safe houses to those fleeing plantations in the American south for free states and colonial Canada, where slavery was abolished by the British Empire in 1833.
The Railroad then lasted some 30 years, succeeding a longer and less glorious era.
"Canadian slavery transpires over 200 plus years," says Charmaine Nelson, an art history professor at McGill University. "So what does it take to erase 200 years of history from the collective consciousness of a nation, but to enshrine three decades?"
----Slavery is Canada's best-kept secret----
Canada has burnished its reputation as the Railroad's central station, the saviour of runaway slaves. Generations of Canadians have grown up with the idea that slavery somehow stopped at the American border. As we hear, a surprised former prime minister never knew it happened here. Another former PM said famously that Canada has "no history of colonialism."
As Afua Cooper says, slavery is Canada's best-kept secret.
What Nelson calls our "strategic ignorance," harks all the way back to slave-owners themselves, whose selective diaries were replete with euphemisms like "servants" and extended family.
The slaves themselves were silenced. They worked so hard that they died at 20 years old or so. If ever they had time to collect their thoughts, they could scarcely record them for posterity. Masters often prohibited them from speaking their own languages. They stripped them of their original African and Indigenous names, and assigned French and English names, effectively wiping out their identity.
Now a small but growing number of scholars is unearthing court records, local registries and a host of archives to get a glimpse into the less luminous chambers of our past.
Thanks to a new generation of historians — building on the work of pioneers like James Walker and Marcel Trudel — at least part of the injurious erasure is being reversed.
----Additional note: A word on 'Canada'----
This documentary chronicles slavery as it occurred "in Canada" prior to Confederation and refers to the birthplace of Canada or colonial Canada. Since the 16th century, settlers, officials and historians have used the term "Canada" — often interchangeably with other names, from New France and British North America to Upper Canada and Lower Canada.
CBC - Ideas
Host Paul Kennedy
Guests:
Afua Cooper
Brett Rushforth
Camille Turner
Charmaine Nelson
George Elliott Clarke
Michael Farkas
June 28, 2018
CBC Radio - Ideas
https://www.dal.ca/faculty/arts/soci...ua-cooper.html
https://history.uoregon.edu/profile/bhru
camille turner
https://www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/people-co...faculty/nelson
https://lop.parl.ca/About/Parliament...ureate7-e.html
Clarke
http://s//moishistoiredesnoirs.com/e...t-du-president
https://liguedesnoirs.org/en
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montr...tion-1.3787740
https://www.citywindsor.ca/residents...aby-House.aspx
https://www.amazon.com/Dictionnaire-.../dp/2890458334
https://www.reuters.com/article/colu...58P05Z20090926
Part I of II
(Flash Audio)
Canada's slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavement | CBC Radio
Part II of II
Slavery's long shadow: The impact of 200 years enslavement in Canada
Is there a connection between the enslavement of African-Canadians and their overwhelming presence in the criminal justice system today? The United Nations has sounded the alarm on anti-black racism in Canada, stating it can be traced back to slavery and its legacy. In Part 2 of this series on slavery in colonial Canada, Kyle G. Brown explores the long-lasting ramifications of one of humanity's most iniquitous institutions.
For years, activists have been demanding reparations for centuries of injustice — which they say didn't end with abolition.
----The many faces of racism----
From racial slurs to microaggressions, racism remains entrenched in Canadian society, and its root cause may reach further back than we think.
In Nova Scotia alone in recent years, there has been a cross-burning on the lawn of a mixed race couple, racist graffiti on the campaign signs of minority candidates in provincial elections and a noose tied to a black teacher's classroom door.
Figures released last year revealed that hate crimes across the country rose for three years in a row, with crimes targeting black populations being the most common.
For historians like Afua Cooper at Dalhousie University in Halifax, these phenomena are all part of the legacy of slavery in colonial Canada.
"What slavery did in Canada was it made [the concept of] race," she says. "If we are looking at one of the legacies of slavery in Canada, it made white people white and black people black. And in doing so, it created black inferiority, black subjugation, white supremacy and white hegemony that we are still living with to this day."
A number of measures casts this inequality into sharp relief. In Ontario, black women are likelier than whites to be unemployed, despite having higher levels of education. Black children are more likely to be in foster care.
----'Policing arose out of slave patrols'----
Investigations of the Toronto and Halifax police forces found that African-Canadians are stopped and searched three times more often than white Canadians.
"Black people are being surveilled and over-policed and carded at a rate that is disproportionate to other people, especially white citizens."
--Charmaine Nelson--
Some historians trace this trend back to slavery and segregation.
"Policing arose out of slave patrols," says Professor of Art History at McGill University, Charmaine Nelson. "Black people are being surveilled and over-policed and carded at a rate that is disproportionate to other people, especially white citizens."
"So we're still subjected to a heightened surveillance on the basis of our race, and where does that come from? This is slavery," she says. "How do you think they could catch fugitives, if not to have networks of people who were willing to put their necks on the line to catch people for a reward?"
A 2017 report by the United Nations Human Rights Working group called on Canada to recognize the lasting damage done by slavery and segregation.
It said these systems "lie at the core" of persistent, structural racism, which took hold in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. French settlers and white Loyalists fleeing the American Revolution, received plum political posts and large land grants, and their wealth and influence passed down from generation to generation. Most of the first black people living in colonial Canada were enslaved, and even after abolition, they were landless and poor.
Post abolition it was the slave-owners, not the slaves, who were awarded compensation — for "lost property." The ramifications of both the trauma of slavery and the massive wealth gap it created have reverberated across the generations.
Campaigners demand compensation to address the deep socio-economic divide. And in early 2018, black history experts told a Senate Committee on Human Rights that the government should apologize and pay reparations to descendants of slaves. This gesture, they say, would pave the way for the kind of reconciliation that has begun with First Nations.
Canadian governments have issued apologies and compensation to LGBTQ communities, victims of Japanese internment and families affected by the Chinese Head Tax.
Ottawa has yet to respond to demands by slaves' descendants for reparations.
Host Paul Kennedy
Guests:
Afua Cooper
Brett Rushforth
Camille Turner
Charmaine Nelson
Cikiah Thomas
George Elliott Clarke
Natasha Henry
Vanessa Fells
July 05, 2018
CBC Radio - Ideas
http://www.dal.ca/faculty/arts/socio...ua-cooper.html
http://history.uoregon.edu/profile/bhru
camille turner
http://www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/people-con...faculty/nelson
https://www.facebook.com/Global-Afri...l-116805252888
http://lop.parl.ca/About/Parliament/...ureate7-e.html
Clarke
Ontario Black History - Home
| Black Loyalist Heritage Society
N.S. man guilty of hate crime in cross-burning | CBC News
N.S. couple shaken by cross burning | CBC News
UPDATE: Election signs defaced with racist graffiti on election day | The Chronicle Herald
South Shore Regional School Board deals with racially charged incidents | CBC News
https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/dail...71128d-eng.htm
A/HRC/36/60/Add.1 - E
https://sencanada.ca/en/sencaplus/ne...gy-reparations
(Flash Audio)
Slavery's long shadow: The impact of 200 years enslavement in Canada | CBC Radio
 
spilledthebeer
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by OpposingDigit View Post

Canada's slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavement
Hiding two centuries of slavery requires some effort, and it is a collective silence that historian Afua Cooper calls the 'erasure of blackness.'
Why is it common knowledge that we saved runaway slaves from the United States, but few know that Africans and Indigenous peoples were bought, sold and exploited, right here?
In part one of a two-part series, contributor Kyle G. Brown asks how slavery was allowed to continue for some 200 years, and be one of the least talked about aspects of our history.
----The 'erasure of blackness'----
Canada's towns, parks and universities are abound with statues and street signs that have immortalized our "founding fathers." But there is no sign of the men, women and children that some of these powerful men enslaved.
Small wonder then, that many of us today are unaware that Indigenous and African peoples were forced into bondage across colonial Canada.
Hiding two centuries of slavery requires some effort, and it is a collective silence that historian Afua Cooper calls the "erasure of blackness."
There's perhaps no better symbol of erasure than an invisible cemetery.
----An invisible cemetery----
Every year the Black Coalition of Quebec organizes a grim pilgrimage to an unmarked grave. About an hour from Montreal outside the village of Saint Armand, close to a dozen slaves are said to be buried near a large whale-shaped boulder.
Little is known of the people enslaved by the Luke family — loyalists who fled the United States in the 1780s. And while the family cemetery still stands — its tombstones bent with age — their slaves left behind a trail of disappearing clues.
Ploughing these fields in the 1950s, a farmer's tractor ground to a halt — on human bones. Elsewhere, they might have been studied and carefully preserved. But these remains were tossed aside and lost.
Oral history has it that they are the bones of the Luke family slaves. This is backed by the preliminary findings of Quebec anthropologist Roland Viau.
Once pointing to these vast rolling fields was a sign that read "Negro Cemetery." It too is now gone. The sign was removed, replaced, and removed again, as though to extirpate the remnants of an embarrassing past.
Beyond the thick woods of Saint Armand, our history has been camouflaged across the country. ​
"Canadian slavery transpires over 200 plus years."
--Charmaine Nelson, McGill Professor of Art History--
Slavery is seldom featured in Canadian museums, except to extol the virtues of Canadians who helped runaways escaping north. The theme gets short shrift even at a museum named after the owner of at least 17 slaves: François Baby House in Windsor.
A 19th century Upper Canada official, François Baby is among hundreds of slave owners listed in the Dictionnaire des Esclaves by late historian Marcel Trudel.
Conventional texts tell at length of the swashbuckling heroes of colonial conquest, but say little of the people they colonized and enslaved.
Or they showcase the Underground Railroad — networks of activists who provided safe houses to those fleeing plantations in the American south for free states and colonial Canada, where slavery was abolished by the British Empire in 1833.
The Railroad then lasted some 30 years, succeeding a longer and less glorious era.
"Canadian slavery transpires over 200 plus years," says Charmaine Nelson, an art history professor at McGill University. "So what does it take to erase 200 years of history from the collective consciousness of a nation, but to enshrine three decades?"
----Slavery is Canada's best-kept secret----
Canada has burnished its reputation as the Railroad's central station, the saviour of runaway slaves. Generations of Canadians have grown up with the idea that slavery somehow stopped at the American border. As we hear, a surprised former prime minister never knew it happened here. Another former PM said famously that Canada has "no history of colonialism."
As Afua Cooper says, slavery is Canada's best-kept secret.
What Nelson calls our "strategic ignorance," harks all the way back to slave-owners themselves, whose selective diaries were replete with euphemisms like "servants" and extended family.
The slaves themselves were silenced. They worked so hard that they died at 20 years old or so. If ever they had time to collect their thoughts, they could scarcely record them for posterity. Masters often prohibited them from speaking their own languages. They stripped them of their original African and Indigenous names, and assigned French and English names, effectively wiping out their identity.
Now a small but growing number of scholars is unearthing court records, local registries and a host of archives to get a glimpse into the less luminous chambers of our past.
Thanks to a new generation of historians — building on the work of pioneers like James Walker and Marcel Trudel — at least part of the injurious erasure is being reversed.
----Additional note: A word on 'Canada'----
This documentary chronicles slavery as it occurred "in Canada" prior to Confederation and refers to the birthplace of Canada or colonial Canada. Since the 16th century, settlers, officials and historians have used the term "Canada" — often interchangeably with other names, from New France and British North America to Upper Canada and Lower Canada.
CBC - Ideas
Host Paul Kennedy
Guests:
Afua Cooper
Brett Rushforth
Camille Turner
Charmaine Nelson
George Elliott Clarke
Michael Farkas
June 28, 2018
CBC Radio - Ideas
https://www.dal.ca/faculty/arts/soci...ua-cooper.html
https://history.uoregon.edu/profile/bhru
camille turner
https://www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/people-co...faculty/nelson
https://lop.parl.ca/About/Parliament...ureate7-e.html
Clarke
http://s//moishistoiredesnoirs.com/e...t-du-president
https://liguedesnoirs.org/en
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montr...tion-1.3787740
https://www.citywindsor.ca/residents...aby-House.aspx
https://www.amazon.com/Dictionnaire-.../dp/2890458334
https://www.reuters.com/article/colu...58P05Z20090926
Part I of II
(Flash Audio)
Canada's slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavement | CBC Radio
Part II of II
Slavery's long shadow: The impact of 200 years enslavement in Canada
Is there a connection between the enslavement of African-Canadians and their overwhelming presence in the criminal justice system today? The United Nations has sounded the alarm on anti-black racism in Canada, stating it can be traced back to slavery and its legacy. In Part 2 of this series on slavery in colonial Canada, Kyle G. Brown explores the long-lasting ramifications of one of humanity's most iniquitous institutions.
For years, activists have been demanding reparations for centuries of injustice — which they say didn't end with abolition.
----The many faces of racism----
From racial slurs to microaggressions, racism remains entrenched in Canadian society, and its root cause may reach further back than we think.
In Nova Scotia alone in recent years, there has been a cross-burning on the lawn of a mixed race couple, racist graffiti on the campaign signs of minority candidates in provincial elections and a noose tied to a black teacher's classroom door.
Figures released last year revealed that hate crimes across the country rose for three years in a row, with crimes targeting black populations being the most common.
For historians like Afua Cooper at Dalhousie University in Halifax, these phenomena are all part of the legacy of slavery in colonial Canada.
"What slavery did in Canada was it made [the concept of] race," she says. "If we are looking at one of the legacies of slavery in Canada, it made white people white and black people black. And in doing so, it created black inferiority, black subjugation, white supremacy and white hegemony that we are still living with to this day."
A number of measures casts this inequality into sharp relief. In Ontario, black women are likelier than whites to be unemployed, despite having higher levels of education. Black children are more likely to be in foster care.
----'Policing arose out of slave patrols'----
Investigations of the Toronto and Halifax police forces found that African-Canadians are stopped and searched three times more often than white Canadians.
"Black people are being surveilled and over-policed and carded at a rate that is disproportionate to other people, especially white citizens."
--Charmaine Nelson--
Some historians trace this trend back to slavery and segregation.
"Policing arose out of slave patrols," says Professor of Art History at McGill University, Charmaine Nelson. "Black people are being surveilled and over-policed and carded at a rate that is disproportionate to other people, especially white citizens."
"So we're still subjected to a heightened surveillance on the basis of our race, and where does that come from? This is slavery," she says. "How do you think they could catch fugitives, if not to have networks of people who were willing to put their necks on the line to catch people for a reward?"
A 2017 report by the United Nations Human Rights Working group called on Canada to recognize the lasting damage done by slavery and segregation.
It said these systems "lie at the core" of persistent, structural racism, which took hold in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. French settlers and white Loyalists fleeing the American Revolution, received plum political posts and large land grants, and their wealth and influence passed down from generation to generation. Most of the first black people living in colonial Canada were enslaved, and even after abolition, they were landless and poor.
Post abolition it was the slave-owners, not the slaves, who were awarded compensation — for "lost property." The ramifications of both the trauma of slavery and the massive wealth gap it created have reverberated across the generations.
Campaigners demand compensation to address the deep socio-economic divide. And in early 2018, black history experts told a Senate Committee on Human Rights that the government should apologize and pay reparations to descendants of slaves. This gesture, they say, would pave the way for the kind of reconciliation that has begun with First Nations.
Canadian governments have issued apologies and compensation to LGBTQ communities, victims of Japanese internment and families affected by the Chinese Head Tax.
Ottawa has yet to respond to demands by slaves' descendants for reparations.
Host Paul Kennedy
Guests:
Afua Cooper
Brett Rushforth
Camille Turner
Charmaine Nelson
Cikiah Thomas
George Elliott Clarke
Natasha Henry
Vanessa Fells
July 05, 2018
CBC Radio - Ideas
http://www.dal.ca/faculty/arts/socio...ua-cooper.html
http://history.uoregon.edu/profile/bhru
camille turner
http://www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/people-con...faculty/nelson
https://www.facebook.com/Global-Afri...l-116805252888
http://lop.parl.ca/About/Parliament/...ureate7-e.html
Clarke
Ontario Black History - Home
| Black Loyalist Heritage Society
N.S. man guilty of hate crime in cross-burning | CBC News
N.S. couple shaken by cross burning | CBC News
UPDATE: Election signs defaced with racist graffiti on election day | The Chronicle Herald
South Shore Regional School Board deals with racially charged incidents | CBC News
https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/dail...71128d-eng.htm
A/HRC/36/60/Add.1 - E
https://sencanada.ca/en/sencaplus/ne...gy-reparations
(Flash Audio)
Slavery's long shadow: The impact of 200 years enslavement in Canada | CBC Radio

Canada's slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavement
Hiding two centuries of slavery requires some effort, and it is a collective silence that historian Afua Cooper calls the 'erasure of blackness.'
Why is it common knowledge that we saved runaway slaves from the United States, but few know that Africans and Indigenous peoples were bought, sold and exploited, right here?
In part one of a two-part series, contributor Kyle G. Brown asks how slavery was allowed to continue for some 200 years, and be one of the least talked about aspects of our history.
----The 'erasure of blackness'----
Canada's towns, parks and universities are abound with statues and street signs that have immortalized our "founding fathers." But there is no sign of the men, women and children that some of these powerful men enslaved.
Small wonder then, that many of us today are unaware that Indigenous and African peoples were forced into bondage across colonial Canada.
Hiding two centuries of slavery requires some effort, and it is a collective silence that historian Afua Cooper calls the "erasure of blackness."
There's perhaps no better symbol of erasure than an invisible cemetery.
----An invisible cemetery----
Every year the Black Coalition of Quebec organizes a grim pilgrimage to an unmarked grave. About an hour from Montreal outside the village of Saint Armand, close to a dozen slaves are said to be buried near a large whale-shaped boulder.
Little is known of the people enslaved by the Luke family — loyalists who fled the United States in the 1780s. And while the family cemetery still stands — its tombstones bent with age — their slaves left behind a trail of disappearing clues.
Ploughing these fields in the 1950s, a farmer's tractor ground to a halt — on human bones. Elsewhere, they might have been studied and carefully preserved. But these remains were tossed aside and lost.
Oral history has it that they are the bones of the Luke family slaves. This is backed by the preliminary findings of Quebec anthropologist Roland Viau.
Once pointing to these vast rolling fields was a sign that read "Negro Cemetery." It too is now gone. The sign was removed, replaced, and removed again, as though to extirpate the remnants of an embarrassing past.
Beyond the thick woods of Saint Armand, our history has been camouflaged across the country. ​
"Canadian slavery transpires over 200 plus years."
--Charmaine Nelson, McGill Professor of Art History--
Slavery is seldom featured in Canadian museums, except to extol the virtues of Canadians who helped runaways escaping north. The theme gets short shrift even at a museum named after the owner of at least 17 slaves: François Baby House in Windsor.
A 19th century Upper Canada official, François Baby is among hundreds of slave owners listed in the Dictionnaire des Esclaves by late historian Marcel Trudel.
Conventional texts tell at length of the swashbuckling heroes of colonial conquest, but say little of the people they colonized and enslaved.
Or they showcase the Underground Railroad — networks of activists who provided safe houses to those fleeing plantations in the American south for free states and colonial Canada, where slavery was abolished by the British Empire in 1833.
The Railroad then lasted some 30 years, succeeding a longer and less glorious era.
"Canadian slavery transpires over 200 plus years," says Charmaine Nelson, an art history professor at McGill University. "So what does it take to erase 200 years of history from the collective consciousness of a nation, but to enshrine three decades?"
----Slavery is Canada's best-kept secret----
Canada has burnished its reputation as the Railroad's central station, the saviour of runaway slaves. Generations of Canadians have grown up with the idea that slavery somehow stopped at the American border. As we hear, a surprised former prime minister never knew it happened here. Another former PM said famously that Canada has "no history of colonialism."
As Afua Cooper says, slavery is Canada's best-kept secret.
What Nelson calls our "strategic ignorance," harks all the way back to slave-owners themselves, whose selective diaries were replete with euphemisms like "servants" and extended family.
The slaves themselves were silenced. They worked so hard that they died at 20 years old or so. If ever they had time to collect their thoughts, they could scarcely record them for posterity. Masters often prohibited them from speaking their own languages. They stripped them of their original African and Indigenous names, and assigned French and English names, effectively wiping out their identity.
Now a small but growing number of scholars is unearthing court records, local registries and a host of archives to get a glimpse into the less luminous chambers of our past.
Thanks to a new generation of historians — building on the work of pioneers like James Walker and Marcel Trudel — at least part of the injurious erasure is being reversed.
----Additional note: A word on 'Canada'----
This documentary chronicles slavery as it occurred "in Canada" prior to Confederation and refers to the birthplace of Canada or colonial Canada. Since the 16th century, settlers, officials and historians have used the term "Canada" — often interchangeably with other names, from New France and British North America to Upper Canada and Lower Canada.
CBC - Ideas
Host Paul Kennedy
Guests:
Afua Cooper
Brett Rushforth
Camille Turner
Charmaine Nelson
George Elliott Clarke
Michael Farkas
June 28, 2018
CBC Radio - Ideas
https://www.dal.ca/faculty/arts/soci...ua-cooper.html
https://history.uoregon.edu/profile/bhru
camille turner
https://www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/people-co...faculty/nelson
https://lop.parl.ca/About/Parliament...ureate7-e.html
Clarke
http://s//moishistoiredesnoirs.com/e...t-du-president
https://liguedesnoirs.org/en
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montr...tion-1.3787740
https://www.citywindsor.ca/residents...aby-House.aspx
https://www.amazon.com/Dictionnaire-.../dp/2890458334
https://www.reuters.com/article/colu...58P05Z20090926
Part I of II
(Flash Audio)
Canada's slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavement | CBC Radio
Part II of II
Slavery's long shadow: The impact of 200 years enslavement in Canada
Is there a connection between the enslavement of African-Canadians and their overwhelming presence in the criminal justice system today? The United Nations has sounded the alarm on anti-black racism in Canada, stating it can be traced back to slavery and its legacy. In Part 2 of this series on slavery in colonial Canada, Kyle G. Brown explores the long-lasting ramifications of one of humanity's most iniquitous institutions.
For years, activists have been demanding reparations for centuries of injustice — which they say didn't end with abolition.
----The many faces of racism----
From racial slurs to microaggressions, racism remains entrenched in Canadian society, and its root cause may reach further back than we think.
In Nova Scotia alone in recent years, there has been a cross-burning on the lawn of a mixed race couple, racist graffiti on the campaign signs of minority candidates in provincial elections and a noose tied to a black teacher's classroom door.
Figures released last year revealed that hate crimes across the country rose for three years in a row, with crimes targeting black populations being the most common.
For historians like Afua Cooper at Dalhousie University in Halifax, these phenomena are all part of the legacy of slavery in colonial Canada.
"What slavery did in Canada was it made [the concept of] race," she says. "If we are looking at one of the legacies of slavery in Canada, it made white people white and black people black. And in doing so, it created black inferiority, black subjugation, white supremacy and white hegemony that we are still living with to this day."
A number of measures casts this inequality into sharp relief. In Ontario, black women are likelier than whites to be unemployed, despite having higher levels of education. Black children are more likely to be in foster care.
----'Policing arose out of slave patrols'----
Investigations of the Toronto and Halifax police forces found that African-Canadians are stopped and searched three times more often than white Canadians.
"Black people are being surveilled and over-policed and carded at a rate that is disproportionate to other people, especially white citizens."
--Charmaine Nelson--
Some historians trace this trend back to slavery and segregation.
"Policing arose out of slave patrols," says Professor of Art History at McGill University, Charmaine Nelson. "Black people are being surveilled and over-policed and carded at a rate that is disproportionate to other people, especially white citizens."
"So we're still subjected to a heightened surveillance on the basis of our race, and where does that come from? This is slavery," she says. "How do you think they could catch fugitives, if not to have networks of people who were willing to put their necks on the line to catch people for a reward?"
A 2017 report by the United Nations Human Rights Working group called on Canada to recognize the lasting damage done by slavery and segregation.
It said these systems "lie at the core" of persistent, structural racism, which took hold in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. French settlers and white Loyalists fleeing the American Revolution, received plum political posts and large land grants, and their wealth and influence passed down from generation to generation. Most of the first black people living in colonial Canada were enslaved, and even after abolition, they were landless and poor.
Post abolition it was the slave-owners, not the slaves, who were awarded compensation — for "lost property." The ramifications of both the trauma of slavery and the massive wealth gap it created have reverberated across the generations.
Campaigners demand compensation to address the deep socio-economic divide. And in early 2018, black history experts told a Senate Committee on Human Rights that the government should apologize and pay reparations to descendants of slaves. This gesture, they say, would pave the way for the kind of reconciliation that has begun with First Nations.
Canadian governments have issued apologies and compensation to LGBTQ communities, victims of Japanese internment and families affected by the Chinese Head Tax.
Ottawa has yet to respond to demands by slaves' descendants for reparations.
Host Paul Kennedy
Guests:
Afua Cooper
Brett Rushforth
Camille Turner
Charmaine Nelson
Cikiah Thomas
George Elliott Clarke
Natasha Henry
Vanessa Fells
July 05, 2018
CBC Radio - Ideas
http://www.dal.ca/faculty/arts/socio...ua-cooper.html
http://history.uoregon.edu/profile/bhru
camille turner
http://www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/people-con...faculty/nelson
https://www.facebook.com/Global-Afri...l-116805252888
http://lop.parl.ca/About/Parliament/...ureate7-e.html
Clarke
Ontario Black History - Home
| Black Loyalist Heritage Society
N.S. man guilty of hate crime in cross-burning | CBC News
N.S. couple shaken by cross burning | CBC News
UPDATE: Election signs defaced with racist graffiti on election day | The Chronicle Herald
South Shore Regional School Board deals with racially charged incidents | CBC News
https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/dail...71128d-eng.htm
A/HRC/36/60/Add.1 - E
https://sencanada.ca/en/sencaplus/ne...gy-reparations
(Flash Audio)
Slavery's long shadow: The impact of 200 years enslavement in Canada | CBC Radio


Oh dear me.......ALL THAT LIE-beral angst in a FAILED effort to prove Cdns are systemic racists!!!!


And so very much distortion and deliberate misrepresentation as well!!!!



If we are such vile people then why have there been so many non white people allowed into the country during the 20th century?????


And how is it that competent black people AND FOOLS like Hedy Fry can get elected in Canada?


LIE-berals never explain anything in a logical way because logic will POISON their position!!!!!
 
HeyBill
#16
Enough plowing up old terrible memories. Knowing the old is ok but to live in the present is very much more realistic.

Today we are a racially mixed society where many want every race to live in harmony helping each other as we go.
 
Dixie Cup
+2
#17
Today there is less racism than at any time in our history. Has it been completely eradicated? No - it's a work in progress but we have come far. We must stop looking back and start looking forward, and celebrate our successes. We need to continue to move forward and stop the stupidity of apologizing for things that happened 50 or 100 years ago. We need to continue to learn from past mistakes and move on. Those who refuse to do this do not have our country's best interest at heart.


Canadians should be proud of where we came from and where we are going. However, there are elements that do not want us to succeed as we have in the past. Until this government came into power, we were progressing as we should. Now, we are being attacked not only by our government, but by those who do not have our best interests at heart.
 
Durry
+2
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by HeyBill View Post

many want every race to live in harmony helping each other as we go.

No, what the minorities want is to be accepted as NOT having to do the heavy lifting for Canada to be normally accepted by Caucasions. For instance, those fighting the forest fires in the West are mostly Caucasions, same applied to the Ft Mac fires and also applies the the military recruitment.
Same applies to winning medals for the Olympics, no Canadian minority's in the last Winter Olympics, wtf, start contributing eh.

Minorities make up 22% of Canada's population so minorities in the above areas should also be in the 20% range, but they are not, in reality they make up less than 4%.

So until the minoities do their fair share, they will always be frowned upon.

One of the most gulling issue is that we have Syrian refugees and those Nigerian refugees who just crossed the border, all unemployed and collecting welfare, and here we are bring people from Australia and other countries to help us fight the fire.
I guess we don't want these lazy refugees to hurt themselves by working.
 
pgs
+2
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Durry View Post

No, what the minorities want is to be accepted as NOT having to do the heavy lifting for Canada to be normally accepted by Caucasions. For instance, those fighting the forest fires in the West are mostly Caucasions, same applied to the Ft Mac fires and also applies the the military recruitment.
Same applies to winning medals for the Olympics, no Canadian minority's in the last Winter Olympics, wtf, start contributing eh.

Minorities make up 22% of Canada's population so minorities in the above areas should also be in the 20% range, but they are not, in reality they make up less than 4%.

So until the minoities do their fair share, they will always be frowned upon.

One of the most gulling issue is that we have Syrian refugees and those Nigerian refugees who just crossed the border, all unemployed and collecting welfare, and here we are bring people from Australia and other countries to help us fight the fire.
I guess we don't want these lazy refugees to hurt themselves by working.

Get off the pot , thefighters I passed by today and last week were definitely not all white .Having a problem with our immigration system is fine I have also . Being plum blind is another matter .
 
Danbones
#20
ARSAL, Lebanon (Reuters) - Several hundred refugees returned to Syria from Lebanon on Thursday while hundreds more waited to hear whether their applications to go home would be approved by Syrian authorities
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-m...-idUSKBN1JO1AZ

I guess the western obama/hitlary isus crowd has quit trying to oust Assad, so it's safe for at least the Syrians to start going home to their bombed out rubble piles .
 
Durry
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Get off the pot , thefighters I passed by today and last week were definitely not all white .Having a problem with our immigration system is fine I have also . Being plum blind is another matter .

Learn to read before you spout off.

I didn't say they were all white, I said they are not represented in the 22% range that represent the general population of Canada's minorities.

You are probably too stupid to understand the logic that if every ethnic group is doing its fair share of the heavy lifting, they should be represented in proportion to their population in Canada.. Yeah, I think you are too stupid to understand this logic.
 
Cliffy
#22
Durpy, even you can turn over a new leaf...


[youtube]JeBtIZiyfhM[/youtube]


 
pgs
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Durry View Post

Learn to read before you spout off.

I didn't say they were all white, I said they are not represented in the 22% range that represent the general population of Canada's minorities.

You are probably too stupid to understand the logic that if every ethnic group is doing its fair share of the heavy lifting, they should be represented in proportion to their population in Canada.. Yeah, I think you are too stupid to understand this logic.

Not at all , I understand perfectly , you believe all white peoples are the same .
 
Bar Sinister
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Durry View Post

Learn to read before you spout off.

I didn't say they were all white, I said they are not represented in the 22% range that represent the general population of Canada's minorities.

You are probably too stupid to understand the logic that if every ethnic group is doing its fair share of the heavy lifting, they should be represented in proportion to their population in Canada.. Yeah, I think you are too stupid to understand this logic.


Really? Are we going to place a quota based on ethnicity on every job in Canada? Your racism is distorting your sense of reality.
 
Durry
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Bar Sinister View Post

Really? Are we going to place a quota based on ethnicity on every job in Canada? Your racism is distorting your sense of reality.

Racism starts because of those who do not carry their fair share of the heavy lifting or because they are not contributing like the majority are contributing.

Immigration policy has failed because many immigrants are living off the hard work of Canadian born.
 
Cliffy
-1
#26
Racism is based on ignorance. Where did your ancestors come from? Europe? This country was built by immigrants, pinhead.
 
Walter
#27
When was Canada built?
 
Cliffy
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

When was Canada built?

That is a dumbest question I have ever heard you ask. When was confederation?


Canada is an artificial construct on native land.
 
Durry
+1
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Racism is based on ignorance. Where did your ancestors come from? Europe? This country was built by immigrants, pinhead.

Canada was built by European immigrants, it was not built by immigrants from countries like India or the Middle East, these people from these useless countries only came to the West after it was settled and the infrastructure was built, they could not handle the hardships before then.

They were useless then and they are useless now, that’s why their countries are still shitholes.

Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

T


Canada is an artificial construct on native land.

No it’s not.
 
Cliffy
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Durry View Post

Canada was built by European immigrants, it was not built by immigrants from countries like India or the Middle East, these people from these useless countries only came to the West after it was settled and the infrastructure was built, they could not handle the hardships before then.

They were useless then and they are useless now, that’s why their countries are still shitholes.


No it’s not.

Your ignorance knows no bounds.