Canada one step closer to marijuana legalization


petros
#181
Marijuana Prohibition Was Racist From The Start. Not Much Has Changed.
 
Machjo
#182
I take the same approach on alcohol too, the white man's drug. So we agree on that. But you'd rather liberalize marijuana like alcohol, I'd rather both be equally hidden from public sight.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#183
Quote: Originally Posted by Machjo View Post

I take the same approach on alcohol too, the white man's drug. So we agree on that. But you'd rather liberalize marijuana like alcohol, I'd rather both be equally hidden from public sight.

Why?
 
PoliticalNick
#184
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Why?

Because they trigger him and his addictive personality. According to him hiding all the stores will prevent addicts from accessing the substance.
 
petros
#185
Quote: Originally Posted by Machjo View Post

I take the same approach on alcohol too, the white man's drug. So we agree on that. But you'd rather liberalize marijuana like alcohol, I'd rather both be equally hidden from public sight.

Hiding does nothing and when it comes to drinking Chinese have whitie beat.

Let's have a boo at US drinking stats and your racist comment...

Recent advances in alcohol research continue to build our understanding of alcohol consumption and related consequences for U.S. ethnic minority groups. National surveys show variations across ethnicities in drinking, alcohol use disorders, alcohol problems, and treatment use. Higher rates of high-risk drinking among ethnic minorities are reported for Native Americans and Hispanics, although within-ethnic group differences (e.g., gender, age-group, and other subpopulations) also are evident for ethnicities. Whites and Native Americans have a greater risk for alcohol use disorders relative to other ethnic groups. However, once alcohol dependence occurs, Blacks and Hispanics experience higher rates than Whites of recurrent or persistent dependence. Furthermore, the consequences of drinking appear to be more profound for Native Americans, Hispanics, and Blacks. Disparities in alcohol treatment utilization are most apparent for Hispanics. Explanations for these differences are complex, likely affected by risky drinking behaviors, immigration experiences, racial/ethnic discrimination, economic and neighborhood disadvantage, and variations in alcohol-metabolizing genes. Research must maintain a systematic, strong, and growing focus on ethnic minorities. A more complete understanding of these effects for ethnic minority groups is needed to enable researchers to face the challenges of reducing and ultimately eliminating health disparities in the alcohol field.

NIAAA Publications
 
coldstream
#186
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Educate yourself:
use of cannabis medicines in clinical practice - Google Scholar


Try as they might, the medical marijuana lobby has never been able to produce definitive double blind experimental studies to prove ANY therapeutic use for THC, the active ingredient of cannabis.

The so called medical uses involve pure anecdote for ambiguously defined conditions (insomnia, melancholy, anxiety).. and equally loosely defined outcomes. The lobby is against any standardization of administering it, in terms of doses, diagnoses, companion therapies, methods of injestion or results expectations, since it would undercut the real purpose of medical marijuana, which is to promote weed culture which is inexorably linked to smoking.. for the sole purpose of intoxication.. with all the deliterious physical and mental health effects that it produces. Not only does marijuana smoke contain at least 60 untested elements apart from THC, it definitely contains tars and toxins much like those of tobacco.

Cannabis legalization is linked to the drug legalization movement, promoted by murky international hedge funds like that run by George Soros with his agenda of globalism, radical individualism, moral relativism under the control of a supranational financial tyranny. It's very much like the Opium Trade of the 17th and 18th Centuries that proffers massive profits by enslaving populations to drugs... or like Aldous Huxley's drug addled Brave New World.
Last edited by coldstream; Sep 2nd, 2016 at 01:40 PM..
 
MHz
#187
Minus the nicotine, right?? Perhaps the 'tar' and such is actually the natural oil that is found in all pot plants, hemp included, and since taking that oil is healthy this is just another delivery vehicle where the oil is deposited in the lungs rather than the in the stomach if the product is eaten.

Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post

Try as they might, the medical marijuana lobby has never been able to produce a definitive double blind experimental studies to prove ANY therapeutic use for THC, the active ingredient of cannabis.

The so called medical uses involve pure anecdote for ambiguously defined conditions (insomnia, melancholy, anxiety).. and equally loosely defined outcomes. The lobby is against any standardization of administering it, in terms of doses, diagnoses, companion therapies or method, since it would undercut the real purpose of medical marijuana, which is to promote weed culture which is inexorably linked to smoking.. for the sole purpose of intoxication.. with all the deliterious health effects that produces. Not only does marijuana smoke contain at least 60 untested elements apart from THC, it definitely contains tars and toxins much like those of tobacco.

Cannabis legalization is link to the drug legalization movement, promoted by murky international hedge funds like George Soros. It's very much like the Opium Trade of the 17th and 18th Centuries that proffer massive profits by enslaving populations to drugs.

Hot tub + a bale of leaves = cured and the color change of your skin denotes how high you are.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Anj1-wsYi90

Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post

Cannabis legalization is link to the drug legalization movement, promoted by murky international hedge funds like that run by George Soros. It's very much like the Opium Trade of the 17th and 18th Centuries that proffers massive profits by enslaving populations to drugs.

Just how does that work anyway in that the elite get the cream of the crop and they don't suffer addiction signs yet the ones doing a lesser amount do get addiction signs? Notably withdrawal signs that could be due to the filler used when diluting the base drug. (for sale but without the full benefits of the pure drug)
 
lone wolf
#188
Quote: Originally Posted by Machjo View Post

And my taxes pay for your drug use. Liver sclerosis, lung cancer, etc.

Here's a quarter. We're even....
 
MHz
#189
Taxes the manufacturers were spared as that would have reduced the profits the shareholders, . . . just sayin, . . .
 
JLM
#190
How much will the average Canadian tax payer benefit by the legalization of marijuana for recreational use? My guess is zero. Any profits will be eaten up the bureaucrats controlling and policing it. John Q. Public won't see a nickel!
 
Tecumsehsbones
#191
Median or mean?
 
JLM
#192
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Median or mean?


Probably mean. Whatever includes the wage slave who packs a lunch bucket to work 40 hours a week and people retired from that station in life.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#193
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Probably mean. Whatever includes the wage slave who packs a lunch bucket to work 40 hours a week and people retired from that station in life.

Too bad. I always wanted to meet the average Canadian. Wouldn't be all that tough to locate the median Canadian, but the mean Canadian? Heck, just getting the right racial/ethnic mix in one person's gonna be a pain! Then there's age, income, geography, education level, and so on. She'd also need to be a hermaphrodite.
 
JLM
#194
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Too bad. I always wanted to meet the average Canadian. Wouldn't be all that tough to locate the median Canadian, but the mean Canadian? Heck, just getting the right racial/ethnic mix in one person's gonna be a pain! Then there's age, income, geography, education level, and so on. She'd also need to be a hermaphrodite.


And Bi sexual!
 
Mowich
+1
#195
"Canada one step closer to marijuana legalization"

maybe so, but............

With its patchwork of half-baked, absurd laws, Canada isn't ready for legal weed

"With billions of dollars invested, millions of grams cultivated and thousands of people employed, the grand premiere of Canada’s legal cannabis system is almost upon us. From producers to front-line workers to police to many levels of regulators, a nation is scurrying to ready itself before the curtain lifts. But it will debut as a ragged production. Parts of the set may be unpainted. Not everyone will know their lines. The theater may be variously oversold and partly empty. And whole sections of the stage will remain in darkness.

That’s because Canada’s map will be worse than a splotchy patchwork of where one can shop for marijuana, where one can’t, where one can’t yet and where it kind-of-depends-on-a-few-things. Enforcement of drug-impaired driving laws and other new cannabis-related violations will vary from place to place. Home-grow rules will differ. You’ll be able to smoke a joint on the sidewalk in one city but not the next. In Halifax, you’ll need to seek out a designated toking zone. In Edmonton, find any part of the sidewalk that is not within 10 metres of a bus stop, patio, doorway or window.

“If you’re a person who moves around the country frequently, you’re literally going to need an app that tells you what’s legal and what’s not depending on where you are,” says Ottawa-based cannabis lawyer Trina Fraser. In March, she acquired a trademark for a yet-to-be-developed app, called Canna Do This? But she’s been so busy helping businesses navigate the new regulatory thicket that, come Oct. 17, the app won’t have gotten far past the idea stage."


"Niaz Nejad of the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission (AGLC) is among a number of people interviewed for this article who likened the challenge to building an aircraft while flying it. In December, she added “and cannabis” to her job title of chief operating officer and vice-president of gaming. As such, she will soon become one of the legal pot world’s largest distributors, since all Alberta private retail stores must buy from the provincial wholesaler, which she oversees. Nejad has become so knowledgeable on marijuana strains and potencies that her friends joke she could sell on the corner, and she’s met the gamut of cannabis entrepreneurs. Some producers arrive to her boardroom table in businesslike groups of five or six; others come solo with eyes-reddened or glazed, intimidated by the regulator’s seriousness. Rules of workplace decorum aren’t always in force. After a tense price negotiation, one industrial grower Nejad had been dealing with gave her a massive hug as though they’d known each other for decades. “The gaming suppliers don’t typically bear-hug you after you’ve had a difficult negotiation,” she says with a laugh. “They may want to [put you in a] choke-hold.”

"Uncharted though its path is, Alberta is better equipped than most for private cannabis retail. It pioneered privatized liquor sales 25 years ago, and because it has had relatively few illegal cannabis dispensaries—swiftly cracking down on those that popped up—the province starts with a comparatively clean slate. There’s no cap, but the AGLC expects 250 cannabis stores to open in Alberta during the first wave, or 24 times more per capita than in Quebec. Calgary alone has approved permits for 117, more than Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia combined will initially allow.

Cannabis options inside one of NewLeaf’s fully built-out concept retail stores in Calgary.Photo by: Paul White/NewLeaf Cannabis

But confusing Alberta’s coming pot-store proliferation with the Wild West would be like fearing that one toke makes you a squinting dope fiend. A tour of New Leaf Cannabis’s concept store in a west Calgary strip mall lays bare the tight regulations governing retailers. Windows are covered so nobody can see inside, like an adult video store.

There are no large canisters of cannabis on display, only tiny sample smell jars cable-tethered to tables. In fact, all the product arrives at stores in federally mandated packages that look like a cross between cigarette packs and prescription medicine bottles: child-resistant and opaque, with small logos, much larger health warnings and a stop-sign-like red THC label. These unremarkable bud boxes and baggies must be stored in a backroom with steel-reinforced walls and doors. Conveniently, this concept store used to be a bank, so it’s all in a former vault, says chief administrative officer Angus Taylor. Staff will wander the Apple-style sales floor, swiping customers’ payment cards and retrieving purchased product from the locked backroom. But they’ll be banned from answering customers’ queries about pot’s potential medical benefits. All stores are solely for recreational-use marijuana."

"Such confusion may have been inevitable, given that politicians and bureaucrats face the seemingly incompatible tasks of encouraging legal enjoyment of cannabis while simultaneously shielding everyone from its harms. They’ve been pulled in conflicting directions by entrepreneurs, law enforcement, health experts and grumpy seniors who vote, producing contradictions in rules from jurisdiction to jurisdiction that can border on the absurd. Calgary won’t allow pot shops to operate next to liquor stores (other municipalities have required a buffer zone of 100 m between them), while most Nova Scotia stores will be co-located inside provincial liquor outlets. While stores are not allowed to link products to medical advice, Maritime shops will tell customers how strains may make them feel: Nova Scotia stores will categorize varieties as relax, unwind, centre and enhance—while New Brunswick-sold pot will let users discover, connect or refresh. Stores in New Brunswick and Quebec will require ID checks upon entry; others won’t. Alberta’s online sales portal will require age-of-majority verification, while other province-run sales websites will have the simple checkbox method and request proof of age upon delivery. Manitoba and Saskatchewan will let its private brick-and-mortar retailers sell online, as well."


"In Vancouver, most safe bets are that Oct. 17 will look much like all the days before it. The city, which at one point had more unregulated dispensaries than Starbucks coffeehouses, brought in its own civic licensing regime in 2015, before the passage of federal or provincial rules; 19 are licensed, but far more have only partial okay or fall outside regulations. And a business licence doesn’t automatically mean a store will be okay under the new province-led regime: the B.C. government asks a city for its assessment of provincial licence applicants. But in late August, chief licence inspector Kathryn Holm said Vancouver was still sorting out how to choose its winners and losers. There will be added twists, as what the city previously regulated as “medical marijuana-related” businesses transition to the federal government’s recreational-only model. Stores with terms like “medicinal,” “dispensary” and “health” in their names will have to rebrand. Among other requirements, Vancouver had barred its licensees from having any window coverings, to make it harder to conceal illicit activity. But provincial rules now encourage fully covered windows by requiring that no product displays be visible from outside a store."


"Finally, while almost everybody is expecting a complicated and bumpy first few months after legalization, the icing on the cake could literally be icing and cake. By October 2019, Ottawa must have new regulations in place for cannabis edibles, which for now remain banned. Regulators will soon launch consultations about product types, marketing and food-handling issues; stores that launch in the first year will save room to add fridges and shelves. “This is big now—when edibles come, it’s going to be about 10 times the size of dried flowers and oils,” said Alberta’s Nejad.
If the history of alcohol is any guide, it’s reasonable to think conservative regulations and bans will eventually be loosened. Cannabis lounges could eventually be sanctioned. Alternatively, there could be counter-revolutionary moves—Quebec’s opposition leader, François Legault, has pledged that if he wins the fall election, he will boost the cannabis age to 21 from 18. But there will be time, down the road, to ponder future changes. For most Canadians, the ones under way are proving brain-numbing enough."

Entire article: https://www.macleans.ca/society/mari...or-legal-weed/



 
JLM
#196
Well, good bad or ugly, it's about to be a fact of life and part of "progress". I hope I'm wrong in my evaluation of it. I'm afraid some people are going to be harmed. I don't doubt there are some medical advantages to it, but will these be more than cancelled out by the harm done. Will it add to the carnage on the highways? What are the problems we'll be facing that no one has even thought of yet? The best we can probably hope for is that things will go on much as they are now. There's not likely to be any huge financial dividends!
 
pgs
#197
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Well, good bad or ugly, it's about to be a fact of life and part of "progress". I hope I'm wrong in my evaluation of it. I'm afraid some people are going to be harmed. I don't doubt there are some medical advantages to it, but will these be more than cancelled out by the harm done. Will it add to the carnage on the highways? What are the problems we'll be facing that no one has even thought of yet? The best we can probably hope for is that things will go on much as they are now. There's not likely to be any huge financial dividends!

We have virtual legal marijuana already , are you hearing of an epidemic of marijuana related automobile crashes?
 
petros
+1
#198
I'm happy they have a test to get cocaine, meth and heroine user off the streets.

My "what about" is; "what is being changed in the labour laws?"

Ive worked with people who prefer to smoke weed than drink or do other dope but the tests used could find traces of weed weeks after smoking.

They could come to work half drunk or still wired on blow but could pass a piss test but lose their job if the smoked a joint on Friday night.
 
JLM
#199
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

I'm happy they have a test to get cocaine, meth and heroine user off the streets.

My "what about" is; "what is being changed in the labour laws?"

Ive worked with people who prefer to smoke weed than drink or do other dope but the tests used could find traces of weed weeks after smoking.

They could come to work half drunk or still wired on blow but could pass a piss test but lose their job if the smoked a joint on Friday night.


From what I learned from Judge Judy years ago, the hair test is the most reliable and accurate but the results can take weeks or months.
 
petros
#200
That's is long term. Have labour laws and piss tests gone the way of the dodo or is a weekend or evening smoker still f-cked if they smoked up two weeks ago?
 
JLM
#201
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

That's is long term. Have labour laws and piss tests gone the way of the dodo or is a weekend or evening smoker still f-cked if they smoked up two weeks ago?


I would imagine that test is mainly used in criminal or litigation cases!
 

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