Powerball

spaminator
#61
US$338M Powerball winner charged with sex assault of child
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
First posted: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 03:48 PM EDT | Updated: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 04:14 PM EDT
PATERSON, N.J. — A New Jersey man who once won a US$338-million Powerball jackpot has been charged with sexually assaulting a child.
Pedro Quezada, of Wayne, was charged with sexual assault and endangering the welfare of a child. Passaic County Prosecutor Camelia Valdes said Wednesday that the child was between 11 and 14 when the assaults occurred.
The 49-year-old Quezada faces up to 20 years in prison. His attorney didn’t immediately return a phone call seeking comment on the case.
Valdes says there don’t appear to be any other victims.
Quezada operated a bodega in Passaic when he won the lottery in 2013. He took a $152-million lump-sum payment after taxes.
US$338M Powerball winner charged with sex assault of child | World | News | Toro
 
spaminator
#62
New Hampshire ticket sole winner in $559M Powerball jackpot
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
January 7, 2018
Updated:
January 7, 2018 6:13 PM EST
In this July 1, 2016, file photo, Mega Millions lottery tickets rest on a counter at a Pilot travel center near Burlington, N.C. The jackpot for the Mega Millions lottery game has climbed to over $450 million, just hours before the drawing, Friday, Jan. 5, 2018.Gerry Broome / AP
MERRIMACK, N.H. — It’s been a billion-dollar lottery weekend after a lone Powerball ticket sold in New Hampshire matched all six numbers and will claim a $559.7 million jackpot, one day after another single ticket sold in Florida nabbed a $450 million Mega Millions grand prize.
Since Reeds Ferry Market opened at 5:30 a.m. Sunday, dozens of excited regulars have stopped by the small, independent convenience store in New Hampshire that sold the winning Powerball ticket to congratulate the owner and chat about the win, store owner Sam Safa said. He said he doesn’t know the identity of the winner, but hopes one of the regulars from the over 100-year-old store in Merrimack, about 25 miles (40 kilometres) south of Concord, won the nation’s eighth-largest lottery jackpot.
“I’m very excited and overwhelmed,” said Safa. He said that by selling the ticket, it felt like he himself had won. The store will receive a $75,000 bonus for selling the winning ticket.
Sam Safa, of Merrimack, N.H., owner of Reeds Ferry Market, stands for a photograph outside the convenience store, Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018, in Merrimack. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
The winning Powerball numbers drawn Saturday night were 12-29-30-33-61 and Powerball 26.
The initial jackpot was estimated at $570 million, but the actual jackpot at the time of the drawing was the lesser amount, $559.7 million, New Hampshire Lottery Spokeswoman Maura McCann said Sunday.
As of Sunday evening, the winner had not yet come forward.
“We are looking forward to meeting New Hampshire’s latest big winner — someone woke up a multimillionaire this morning!” said New Hampshire Lottery Executive Director Charlie McIntyre.
The Florida Lottery says the winning Mega Millions ticket from Friday night’s drawing was bought at a 7-Eleven convenience store in Port Richey. The retailer will receive a $100,000 bonus for selling the ticket. The identity of that winner also had not yet been revealed.
The winning numbers to claim the Mega Millions jackpot were 28-30-39-59-70-10.
The jackpots refer to the annuity options for both games, in which payments are made over 29 years. Most winners opt for cash options, which would be $281 million for Mega Millions and $358.5 million for Powerball.
The odds of winning the Mega Millions jackpot are one in 302.5 million. Powerball odds are one in 292.2 million.
Top 10 largest U.S. Jackpots
1. $1.6 billion, Powerball, Jan. 13, 2016 (three tickets, from California, Florida, Tennessee)
2. $758.7 million, Powerball, Aug. 23, 2017 (one ticket, from Massachusetts)
3. $656 million, Mega Millions, March 30, 2012 (three tickets, from Kansas, Illinois and Maryland)
4. $648 million, Mega Millions, Dec. 17, 2013 (two tickets, from California and Georgia)
5. $590.5 million, Powerball, May 18, 2013 (one ticket, from Florida)
6. $587.5 million, Powerball, Nov. 28, 2012 (two tickets, from Arizona and Missouri)
7. $564.1 million, Powerball, Feb. 11, 2015 (three tickets, from North Carolina, Puerto Rico and Texas)
8. $559.7 million jackpot, Powerball, Jan. 6, 2018 (one ticket, New Hampshire)
9. $536 million, Mega Millions, July 8, 2016 (one ticket, from Indiana)
10. $487 million, Powerball, July 30, 2016 (one ticket, from New Hampshire)
New Hampshire ticket sole winner in $559M Powerball jackpot | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#63
$560M Powerball winner: Suing to remain anonymous
Washington Post
More from Washington Post
Published:
February 6, 2018
Updated:
February 6, 2018 9:16 AM EST
In this Aug. 18, 2017, file photo, a customer shows his purchased Powerball tickets in Hialeah, Fla. Alan Diaz / AP
The winning numbers triple-checked and the lottery ticket signed, the New Hampshire woman knew her life was about to change in a very positive way – except for one petrifying thing.
As the winner of last month’s $560 million Powerball, she would soon be the world’s newest owner of a nine-digit bank account.
But because of lottery rules, everyone in the world would know about it – neighbours, old high school friends, con artists, criminals.
Now the woman is asking a judge to let her keep the cash – and remain anonymous. In court documents obtained by NewHampshire.com, she is fittingly identified only as Jane Doe.
“She is a longtime resident of New Hampshire and is an engaged community member,” the woman’s attorney, Steven Gordon, wrote in the court documents. “She wishes to continue this work and the freedom to walk into a grocery store or attend public events without being known or targeted as the winner of a half-billion dollars.”
On one side of the case are lottery officials who say the integrity of the games depends on the public identification of its winners as a protection against fraud and malfeasance. A local woman holding up a giant check while cameras flash and reporters scrawl also happens to be a powerful marketing tool.
On the other side is a woman suddenly faced with a life-changing stroke of luck who, court documents say, wishes to live “far from the glare and misfortune that has often fallen upon other lottery winners.”
The law doesn’t appear to be on her side.
New Hampshire lottery rules require the winner’s name, town and amount won be available for public information, in accordance with open-records laws. The state allows people to form an anonymous trust, NewHampshire.com reported, but it’s a moot point for the woman – she’d already signed her name and altering the signature would nullify the ticket.
In a statement, New Hampshire lottery Executive Director Charlie McIntyre said the commission consulted with the state’s attorney general’s office and that the Powerball winner must abide by the disclosure laws “like any other.”
“The New Hampshire Lottery understands that winning a $560 million Powerball jackpot is a life-changing occurrence,” the statement said. “Having awarded numerous Powerball jackpots over the years, we also understand that the procedures in place for prize claimants are critically important for the security and integrity of the lottery, our players and our games. While we respect this player’s desire to remain anonymous, state statutes and lottery rules clearly dictate protocols.”
Other lottery winners have realized that every ticket-buyer’s fantasy can quickly morph into a nightmare. There are myriad self-inflicted problems that can happen to a person who suddenly comes into great wealth. One bought a water park, for example.
And there are numerous examples of people who’ve tried to swindle lottery winners out of their newly acquired cash – or take the money by force.
In November 2015, Craigory Burch Jr. matched all five numbers in the Georgia Fantasy 5 drawing and won a $434,272 jackpot, The Washington Post’s Lindsey Bever reported.
Two months later, police said, Burch was killed in his home by seven masked men who kicked in his front door. His family members said the public announcement of the lottery winnings had made him a target.
“When they came in, he said: ‘Don’t do it, bro. Don’t do it in front of my kids. Please don’t do it in front of my kids and old lady,’ ” his girlfriend, Jasmine Hendricks, told WALB-TV at the time. “He said, ‘I’ll give you my bank card.’ ”
Abraham Shakespeare won a $30 million lottery prize in 2006. Two years later, he was approached by Dorice “Dee Dee” Moore, who said she was writing a book about how people were taking advantage of him. She soon became his financial adviser and slowly siphoned away his money, according to Fox News.
“She got every bit of his money,” Assistant State Attorney Jay Pruner said in closing arguments. “He found out about it and threatened to kill her. She killed him first.”
$560m Powerball winner is a NH woman - and she's fighting in court to stay anonymous | New Hampshire
$560 million Powerball jackpot is second win in less than two years for New Hampshire - ABC News
$560M Powerball winner: Suing to remain anonymous | Toronto Sun
 
Dixie Cup
+1
#64
I can't say that I blame her - likely people coming out of the woodwork saying they're long lost relatives who need "help".


But because she signed the ticket, she's agreed to be identified as the winner.


If, according to her lawyer, she had put the funds in a trust and had the "trustee" sign the ticket then she wouldn't have to be identified. Wonder if that'd work in Canada 'cuz when I win the "big one" I wouldn't want to be identified either!! I mean who would think of that?


With winnings that big, I'd give a lot of it away; set up a foundation or two to leave a lasting legacy. No one needs that kind of money. I think It's too corrupting.


JMHO
 
taxslave
+1
#65
They won't just be asking for help there will be thousands demanding she "share" her winnings.I would think seriously of retiring with that much coin. Might even foot the bill for a replacement fire hall that is long overdue.
 
spaminator
#66
Powerball winner who demands anonymity to get $559M winnings
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
February 13, 2018
Updated:
February 13, 2018 4:35 PM EST
In this Jan. 7, 2018, file photo, cashiers Kathy Robinson, left, and Ethel Kroska, right, both of Merrimack, N.H., sell a lottery ticket at Reeds Ferry Market convenience store in Merrimack.Steven Senne / AP
NASHUA, N.H. — A New Hampshire woman who won a $559.7 million Powerball jackpot should be able to collect the winnings soon while a judge decides whether to let her remain anonymous.
A judge in Nashua heard arguments Tuesday from lawyers for the woman who say her privacy interests outweigh what the state says is the public’s right to know who won the money in the nation’s eighth-largest lottery jackpot.
The woman, identified as Jane Doe, signed the ticket following the Jan. 6 drawing, but later learned from a lawyer that she could have shielded her identity by writing the name of a trust.
Outside the court, both sides seemed to agree the money could be transferred in the coming days into a trust the woman has set up — the Good Karma Family Trust of 2018.
Her lawyers claim the delay in payment was costing her about $14,000-a-day or about $500,000 a month in interest, and have filed a separate motion with the court to release the money.
“This money is just sitting there doing nothing for nobody,” William Shaheen, one of the woman’s lawyers said. “It’s very important that we redeem this ticket and she gets on with her life.”
New Hampshire Lottery Executive Director Charlie McIntyre said he was inclined to honour the woman’s request, saying it was a separate issue from whether to reveal her name and address.
“We don’t want to be in a position that is adversarial with our prize winners. These are our customers,” McIntyre said.
Lawyers for the woman contend that she was already experiencing stress over the prospect of having to go public and that disclosing her identify would put her safety at risk, expose her family and friends to unwanted media attention and inundate her with harassing calls and emails from people wanting a portion of her fortune.
As part of their motion, the lawyers said their firm has received hundreds of emails. They listed requests for money from sick or homeless people and investment opportunities including an Indonesian company wanting to expand its pallet company across Asia.
New Hampshire ticket sole winner in $559M Powerball jackpot
$560M Powerball winner: Suing to remain anonymous
“How does a person deal with all that, never mind real concerns about threats to her safety?” asked attorney Steven Gordon. “There is documented history of people being harmed, people coming into their homes.”
McIntyre countered it was in the public’s interest to know who won the jackpot and that past lottery winners have gone on to lead “productive, normal, healthy lives and enjoy the fruits of those winnings — pay for college, pay off houses, donate to good causes.”
“For us, this is about the challenge of balancing the privacy rights of the winner against the right of the public to know what the lottery does,” McIntyre said.
In court, a lawyer for the commission said the law was clear on the requirement to release her name and failing to publicize her identity could erode trust in the lottery.
“We don’t get to choose when we follow the law and when we don’t,” Assistant Attorney General John Conforti told the court. “Where there is a public interest in information within a public document, we have an obligation to disclose it. We can’t choose to avoid that obligation because it’s inconvenient or messy.”
Hillsborough County Superior Court Judge Charles Temple didn’t indicate when he would rule.
Powerball winner who demands anonymity to get $559M winnings | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#67
$352 MILLION: U.S. Powerball winner fighting to keep name from going public
Washington Post
More from Washington Post
Published:
March 8, 2018
Updated:
March 8, 2018 10:20 AM EST
The mysterious winner of a $560 million lottery ticket in New Hampshire has finally claimed her prize, through her legal team, but she is still fighting to keep her identity a secret.
William Shaheen, a lawyer for the woman who has thus far remained anonymous, accepted the check for a lump sum of $352 million, about $264 million after taxes, reports said.
The first thing he did was give a total of about $249,000 to a couple of nonprofits – Girls Inc. and three chapters of End 68 Hours of Hunger – and said the woman plans to give away as much as $50 million in the future.
“She realizes how lucky she is,” said Shaheen, according to USA Today. “My client doesn’t want any accolades, she doesn’t want any credit. She just wants to do good things.”
Little is known about the woman, who won the Powerball in January and has asked a judge to let her stay anonymous. She is from southern New Hampshire. The judge who is weighing whether her privacy interests outweigh the state’s lottery rules ruled that the prize money could be awarded while he considers the case, the New Hampshire Union Leader reported.
New Hampshire lottery rules require the winner’s name, town and amount won be available for public information, in accordance with open-records laws and to increase trust in the lottery system.
Attorneys for the state and the lottery commission have argued that the woman should not be allowed to exempt herself from the rules. The state Attorney General’s Office said the woman’s name must be revealed because she signed the back of the ticket, USA Today reported.
New Hampshire lottery executive director Charlie McIntyre said that the Powerball winner must abide by the disclosure laws “like any other,” in February.
“While we respect this player’s desire to remain anonymous, state statutes and lottery rules clearly dictate protocols,” the statement said.
In court documents, the lottery winner asked a judge to allow the lottery winnings to be paid to a designated trust that keeps her anonymous. But lottery officials have argued that even if the cash goes into a trust, the ticket will have to be submitted in its original form – complete with the ticket buyer’s name and home town.
Her lawyers have argued that she is part of a group that “has historically been victimized by the unscrupulous,” and that she made a mistake by signing her name on the ticket, when if she had set up an anonymous trust, she would have been able to avoid identifying herself in that way.
A lawsuit filed by her lawyers says she is an “engaged community member” who wants to go about public life “without being known or targeted as the winner of a half-billion dollars.”
Other lottery winners have realized that every ticket buyer’s fantasy can quickly morph into a nightmare. There are myriad self-inflicted problems that can befall a person who suddenly comes into great wealth. Several have gambled their winnings away, including a two-time lottery winner who ended up living in a trailer.
Billie Bob Harrell Jr., who won $31 million in 1997, told his financial adviser shortly before his suicide that “winning the lottery is the worst thing that ever happened to me.”
And there are numerous examples of people who’ve tried to swindle lottery winners out of their newly acquired cash – or take the money by force.
In 2015, Craigory Burch Jr., the winner of a $434,272 jackpot in Georgia, was killed in his home by seven masked men who kicked in his front door. His family members said the public announcement of the lottery winnings had made him a target.
Abraham Shakespeare, the winner of a $30 million lottery prize in 2006, was approached two years later by a woman who said she was writing a book about how people were taking advantage of him, became his financial adviser and slowly siphoned away his money.
“She got every bit of his money,” Assistant State Attorney Jay Pruner said in closing arguments. “He found out about it and threatened to kill her. She killed him first.”
$352M: Powerball winner desperate to remain anonymous | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#68
Winner of $560 million Powerball jackpot granted right to remain anonymous
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
March 12, 2018
Updated:
March 12, 2018 3:03 PM EDT
In this file photo, a Powerball lottery ticket is seen in a convenience store in Washington on November 26, 2012.SAUL LOEB / AFP/Getty Images
CONCORD, N.H. — A judge ruled Monday that a New Hampshire woman who won a Powerball jackpot worth nearly $560 million can keep her identity private, but not her hometown.
Judge Charles Temple noted that the case’s resolution rested the state’s Right-to-Know law, which governs access to public records for the woman. She was identified as “Jane Doe” in a lawsuit against the New Hampshire Lottery Commission.
“She was jumping up and down,” said her lawyer, William Shaheen. “She will be able to live her life normally.”
Lottery officials and all the charitable organizations that received donations from the anonymous New Hampshire woman who won the $559.7 million Powerball jackpot hold up their check donations at Lottery Headquarters in Concord, New Hampshire on Wednesday, March 7, 2018. (Geoff Forester/The Concord Monitor via AP)
Shaheen said the woman is from Merrimack, 25 miles (40 kilometres) south of Concord. The winning ticket was sold at the Reeds Ferry Market in that town for the Jan. 6 drawing.
Temple wrote he had “no doubts whatsoever that should Ms. Doe’s identity be revealed, she will be subject to an alarming amount of harassment, solicitation, and other unwanted communications.” He said she met her burden of showing that her privacy interest outweighs the public’s interest in disclosing her name in the nation’s eighth-largest jackpot.
However, Temple noted that nothing in his order could be interpreted to prevent the lottery commission or its employees from “processing, maintaining, or accessing Ms. Doe’s ticket in the normal course of business.”
The woman signed her ticket after the drawing, but later learned from lawyers that she could have shielded her identity by writing the name of a trust. They said she was upset after learning she was giving up her anonymity by signing the ticket — something the lottery commission acknowledged isn’t spelled out on the ticket, but is detailed on its website. The woman ended up establishing the Good Karma Family Trust of 2018.
Attorney Steven M. Gordon, who represents lottery winner “Jane Doe”, holds up an annual report from the New Hampshire Lottery during a hearing in the Jane Doe v. NH Lottery Commission case at Hillsborough Superior Court in Nashua, N.H., Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, Pool)
Temple found that the commission’s argument that revealing her name to ensure the public she’s a “bona fide” lottery participant and “real” winner was not persuasive, because a trustee claiming a prize on someone’s behalf is certainly not a “bona fide” participant or a “real” winner.
“While we were expecting a different outcome and believed the state had a strong argument, we respect the court’s decision,” Charlie McIntyre, commission executive director, said in a statement. “That said, we will consult with the Attorney General’s office to determine appropriate next steps regarding the case.”
Last week, the commission handed over $264 million — the amount left after taxes were deducted — to the woman’s lawyers. They said she would give $150,000 to Girls Inc. and $33,000 apiece to three chapters of End 68 Hours of Hunger in the state. It is the first of what her lawyers said would be donations over the years of between $25 million to $50 million during her lifetime.
Winner of $560 million Powerball jackpot granted right to remain anonymous | Toronto Sun
 

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