Alan Thicke dead at 69


Locutus
#1
Alan Thicke dead at 69 - CNN.com
 
Murphy
+1
#2  Top Rated Post
Yes, hearing of the passing of anyone your know or has been a ride-along in your life is always sad. He went doing what he liked to do though. That's not a comfort, but it's better than wasting away in a hospital.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#3
He died while playing shinny ... a true patriot, I would say.
 
Mokkajava
#4
Oh wow! Was not expecting this. Like Alan Rickman... he was too young.
 
spaminator
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#6
He died a Canadian death ... playing hockey. RIP.
 
Mowich
#7
Hockey, humour and homegrown pride: Alan Thicke's Canadian appeal

Tributes for Kirkland Lake, Ont.-born actor and songwriter pour in from friends, fans and admirers



A prominent member of the famous TV dads club, Alan Thicke held a special place in the hearts of Canadians.

Notwithstanding his entertainment world success, the actor, writer, composer and host never lost the pride in his homeland, his Canadian sense of humour, his devotion to our national winter sport or his realistic perspective about show business.

Made in Canada television

Thicke's show biz roots were imminently Canadian: He got an early start in the late 1960s performing, hosting and writing for Canadian radio and television programs at the CBC, working with the likes of Anne Murray, Tommy Hunter, Alex Trebek and Lorne Michaels.

A Canadian in Hollywood

That range of experience gained at the public broadcaster proved invaluable when he chose to venture south of the border.

"After a few years at the CBC, when I finally decided that maybe I would try my luck in the L.A. market, I was able to go down there with a portfolio of experience in a lot of different areas," Thicke told The Canadian Press in 2011.

Once stateside, he proved a versatile journeyman, taking on many different roles — from comedy writing for the likes of Richard Pryor, Glen Campbell and Olivia Newton-John, to hosting an ill-fated late-night talk and sketch-comedy show (that nonetheless helped launch the late-night career of sidekick Arsenio Hall).

He landed his breakout role in the mid-1980s as patriarch Jason Seaver on TV's family-friendly sitcom Growing Pains,a comfort-food series that brought him into millions of living rooms and would become his defining role. Even with his newfound fame, however, Thicke never stopped boosting peers, up-and-comers and, especially, fellow Canadians in Hollywood.

Added to Canada's Walk of Fame in Toronto in 2013, Thicke said at the time he felt proud he was considered a Canadian entertainment industry pioneer, and hoped "part of that will be what I'm remembered for."

He was always quick to say how proud he was of being Canadian.

"It's part of my identity, and a unique thing I carry with me is my Canadian-ness and we're good folk."

The best game you can name

Hockey was also one of Thicke's lifelong obsessions. A player, fan and proponent of Canada's beloved sport, he was a frequent attendee of NHL all-star games, charity and special events, and served as MC for friend and NHL great Wayne Gretzky's wedding to Janet Jones.

Thicke defended Ken Dryden's The Game on Canada Reads, and had even boasted he had introduced many celebs to the game.

The music man

Lesser known was Thicke's sideline gig as a successful TV theme song composer (Diff'rent Strokes, The Facts of Life, Wheel of Fortune and more), which garnered him kudos from the music world. Canadian super producer David Foster was a lifelong friend, including Thicke among the Canadian superstar musicians participating in his 1985 charity anthem Tears Are Not Enough and serving as an early mentor of his R&B singer son, Robin Thicke.

Canadian content

Thicke stayed busy with movie and TV roles, as well as hosting gigs over the years. He had famously put his Canuck roots on display (for instance, helping son Carter prepare for the Canadian citizenship test on his reality series Unusually Thicke) or mine it for laughs (during his popular guest stints on How I Met Your Mother).

Modest and self-deprecating

"Instead of me being able to do anything particularly well, I did a bunch of things that were fun and I did them OK," Thicke told CBC's Stroumboulopoulos Tonight in 2011, saying he was content with his place in the entertainment industry.

"My career has been different just about every day."

Through it all, Thicke maintained his happy, wise-cracking demeanour — even at the Whistler Film Festival in B.C. earlier this month while promoting his latest film, the Edmonton-shot comedy It's Not My Fault and I Don't Care Anyway, and being acknowledged with a career achievement honour.

Hockey, humour and homegrown pride: Alan Thicke's Canadian appeal - Entertainment - CBC News
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#8
My wife used to work with Alan Thicke's father, who was a medical doctor. "What a nice man" she says.
 
spaminator
spaminator
spaminator
spaminator
spaminator
Danbones
#14
Quote:

Thicke died at a Burbank, California, hospital on Dec. 13 at age 69.

good Idea to stay away from places like that, hospitals are places where people go to die
 
spaminator
spaminator
#16
Alan Thicke's final performance | Movies | Entertainment | Toronto Sun
 
B00Mer
#17
Necro thread!!

Breaking News!! Alan Thicke brought back to life!!

Removed from the CryoTube, doctors were able to revive him.
 
spaminator
#18
Loving brother fondly remembers Alan Thicke | World | News | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#19
Alan Thicke's widow slams Robin Thicke and his brother for
 
Tecumsehsbones
#20
This update: As of this morning, we can confirm that Alan Thicke is still dead.
 
spaminator
Kreskin
#22
Did he die again?
 
spaminator
spaminator
#24
Alan Thicke's widow scores early court victory in dispute with stepsons
wenn.com
First posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 10:39 PM EDT | Updated: Thursday, September 14, 2017 10:45 PM EDT
Alan Thicke’s widow has scored a small victory in her legal battle with stepsons Robin and Brennan over the late actor/singer’s estate.
Singer Robin Thicke and his brother Brennan went to war with their stepmother Tanya Callau in May, seeking to ban her from challenging the terms of the pre-nuptial agreement she signed with Alan four days before their wedding in 2005.
The siblings claimed the actress/model, aka Tanya Thicke, had threatened to go public with family secrets if she didn’t receive a bigger cut of the Growing Pains star’s estate, but she denied the allegations, making it clear she has no intention of challenging the pre-nup and only wants what is rightfully hers.
Alan’s will entitled her to 25% of his personal effects, a $500,000 life insurance policy, and permission to live at his Carpinteria, California ranch as long as she agreed to maintain the property.
The judge overseeing the family dispute has since sided with Tanya, dismissing the Thicke brothers’ petition, ruling there is no evidence to suggest their stepmother is planning to sue over Alan’s will.
However, according to TMZ.com, Robin and Brennan have been given the option of filing a new claim against Tanya, as long as they provide “more specifics” to back up their argument.
At the time of the Thicke siblings’ initial court filing, Tanya’s attorney Adam Streisand insisted she was being unfairly targeted in a phony legal bid.
“Tanya Thicke has never threatened to take private family matters public and she never has,” he told the New York Post’s Page Six in May. “It is clear that Alan’s sons have chosen this distasteful public smear tactic to bully Tanya, by stirring up the tabloid media, filing a bogus lawsuit, and refusing family mediation.
“Tanya is still grieving the death of her beloved husband and out of respect for Alan’s memory intends to handle his sons’ false statements privately.”
TV icon Alan died in December, aged 69, after suffering a heart attack while playing ice hockey with his adult son Carter.
Alan Thicke's Widow Scores Legal Win Against Sons Robin and Brennan | TMZ.com
Alan Thicke's widow scores early court victory in dispute with stepsons | Celebr
 
spaminator
#25
Alan Thicke's dad accused of groping patient’s breasts
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
January 8, 2018
Updated:
January 8, 2018 2:42 PM EST
Alan Thicke, left, with father Dr. Brian Thicke. (SUPPLIED PHOTO)
A Brampton doctor identified as the father of the late TV star Alan Thicke will face a disciplinary hearing on allegations that he sexually abused a patient who came to him for a pilot’s medical exam more than two decades ago.
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario says Dr. Brian Christopher Thicke will appear before its discipline committee to face allegations that he touched a patient’s breasts in a sexual manner and/or conducted an inappropriate or unnecessary breast exam in 1993 and 1995.
A spokesman for the college says a date for the hearing has not yet been set because the matter was referred to the committee recently.
The college had previously decided not to refer the case to its discipline committee but was ordered to reconsider last year after the complainant, Lisa Fruitman — who is not named in documents but has agreed to be identified — appealed to a medical regulator.
Allegations have not been proven
At the time, the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board said it found the college’s decision to be “unreasonable.”
The allegations have not been proven and Thicke’s lawyer did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Fruitman, who brought her complaint to the college in 2015, said she is relieved to finally have the allegations taken seriously and hopes the case will lift some of the secrecy surrounding complaints made to the college.
‘It’s taken a ridiculous amount of time’
“I reported this three years ago,” before the recent wave of sex assault allegations brought the issue into the spotlight, she said. “But it’s taken a ridiculous amount of time to even get it to this point.”
Though the review board did not name the physician in its ruling, Fruitman identified him as Thicke, a Brampton doctor and the father of Alan Thicke and grandfather of musician Robin Thicke.
In its ruling, the board — which doesn’t determine guilt but regulates the health-care profession’s self-governing bodies — said the allegations date back to when Fruitman sought a civil aviation medical examination.
‘Playing with her breasts’
Fruitman recalled that it felt like Thicke was “playing with her breasts,” the document said. “She recalled that it felt wrong, like there was no need for the breast examination. The examination felt more like a massage.”
She also said she wasn’t offered a chaperone and Thicke didn’t leave the room when she was undressing for the exam, the document reads.
The decision said Fruitman later contacted Transport Canada to check if a breast exam is part of an aviation medical Class 3 examination and was told it isn’t.
“I didn’t want it and was told he needed to do it if I wanted him to sign my licence,” she told The Canadian Press on Monday.
Breast exam was not explicitly required
The document said Thicke’s lawyer argued that a full physical exam was the standard at the time, even though a breast exam was not explicitly required.
The board found the college’s Inquiries, Complaints and Reports Committee accepted that argument but didn’t offer up any evidence. It also said there were other ways in which the committee’s decision not to refer the matter to the discipline committee wasn’t supported by the records.
The board further said the committee gave no reasons for why it didn’t give more weight to Thicke’s conduct history, noting that he had been investigated by the college on previous occasions.
In a 1994 case, the document said, another woman reported Thicke to police after receiving her pilot’s medical exam from him, alleging she had received an inappropriate breast exam.
‘Now we are going to look at your boobies’
She alleged the doctor said, “Now we are going to look at your boobies,” and lifted her shirt and bra before squeezing her breasts, the board document said.
Thicke was taken into police custody but released without charges or conditions, and the complaints committee did not pursue further investigation, it reads.
In a separate matter, the doctor was required to meet with a senior college staff member in connection with a complaint that he told a patient to remove her top and pull her underwear partway down before assessing her lumbar range of motion and “slapped her on the buttocks,” the document said.
The decision said Thicke acknowledged that was his usual practice but noted that he had no gowns in the office at the time and has since rectified the issue.
According to the College of Physicians and Surgeons he’s been a registered doctor in Ontario since 1956.
| Doctor Details | Public Information & Services | College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario
Alan Thicke’s dad accused of groping patient