'Solid evidence' for 9th planet in solar system: Scientists


spaminator
#1
'Solid evidence' for 9th planet in solar system: Scientists
Marcia Dunn, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
First posted: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 12:15 PM EST | Updated: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 05:20 PM EST
This one is 5,000 times bigger than outcast Pluto and billions of miles farther away, say scientists who presented "good evidence" for a long-hypothesized Planet X on Wednesday.
The gas giant is thought to be almost as big as its nearest planetary neighbour Neptune, quite possibly with rings and moons. It's so distant that it would take a mind-blowing 10,000 to 20,000 years to circle the sun.
Planet 9, as the pair of California Institute of Technology researchers calls it, hasn't been spotted yet. They base their prediction on mathematical and computer modeling, and anticipate its discovery via telescope within five years or less.
The two reported their research Wednesday in the Astronomical Journal because they want people to help them look for it.
"We could have stayed quiet and quietly spent the next five years searching the skies ourselves and hoping to find it. But I would rather somebody find it sooner, than me find it later," astronomer Mike Brown told The Associated Press.
"I want to see it. I want to see what it looks like. I want to understand where it is, and I think this will help."
Brown and planetary scientist Konstantin Batygin feel certain about their prediction, which at first seemed unbelievable to even them.
"For the first time in more than 150 years, there's good evidence that the planetary census of the solar system is incomplete," Batygin said, referring to Neptune's discovery as Planet 8.
Once it's detected, Brown insists there will be no Pluto-style planetary debate. Brown ought to know; he's the so-called Pluto killer who helped lead the charge against Pluto's planetary status in 2006. (Once Planet 9, Pluto is now officially considered a dwarf planet.)
"THIS is what we mean when we say the word 'planet,' " Brown said.
Brown and Batygin believe it's big -- 10 times more massive than Earth -- and unlike Pluto, dominates its cosmic neighbourhood. Pluto is a gravitational slave to Neptune, they pointed out.
Another scientist, Alan Stern, said he's withholding judgment on the planet prediction. He is the principal scientist for NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, which buzzed Pluto last summer in the first-ever visit from Planet Earth. He still sees Pluto as a real planet -- not a second-class dwarf.
"This kind of thing comes around every few years. To date, none of those predicts have been borne out by discoveries," Stern said in an email Wednesday. "I'd be very happy if the Brown-Batygin were the exception to the rule, but we'll have to wait and see. Prediction is not discovery."
Brown and Batygin shaped their calculation on the fact that six objects in the icy Kuiper Belt, or Twilight Zone on the far reaches of the solar system, appear to have orbits influenced by only one thing: a real planet. The vast, mysterious Kuiper Belt is home to Pluto as well.
Brown actually discovered one of these six objects more than a decade ago, Sedna, a large minor planet.
"What we have found is a gravitational signature of Planet 9 lurking in the outskirts of the solar system,' Batygin said. The actual discovery, he noted, will be "era-defining."
Added Brown: "We have felt a great disturbance in the force."
Scott Sheppard of the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington said Brown and Batygin's effort takes his own findings to "the next level." Two years ago, he and a colleague suggested a possible giant planet.
"I find this new work very exciting," Sheppard said in an email. "It makes the distant Super-Earth planet in our solar system much more real. I would say the odds just went from 50% to 75% that this distant massive planet is real."
Depending on where this Planet 9 is in its egg-shaped orbit, a space telescope may be needed to confirm its presence, the researchers said. Or good backyard telescopes may spot it, they noted, if the planet is relatively closer to us in its swing around the sun. It's an estimated 20 billion to 100 billion miles away.
The Caltech researchers prefer calling it Planet 9, versus the historical term Planet X. The latter smacks of "aliens and the imminent destruction of the Earth," according to Brown.
Who knows, there could even be a Planet 10 out there well beyond No. 9, but there aren't enough data at this point to guess, Brown said.
The last real planet to be discovered in our solar system was Neptune in 1846. Pluto's discovery came in 1930; humanity got to see the small icy world and its main moon Charon up close for the first time last July thanks to New Horizons.
The spacecraft, unfortunately, is in the opposite direction of Planet 9, according to the researchers, and thus unable to help in its detection.
Brown realizes skepticism will exist until the planet is actually observed. History is packed with mistaken planet-seekers, he said, and so "standing up and saying we're right this time makes us almost look crazy -- except I'm going to stand up and say we're actually right this time."
He couldn't resist this jab on his bplutokiller Twitter account:
"OK, OK, I am now willing to admit: I DO believe that the solar system has nine planets."
'Solid evidence' for 9th planet in solar system: Scientists | World | News | Tor
the 9th planet is orbiting earths second sun.
 
spaminator
#2
Planet hunter, Xena lover discovers 'Planet Nine'
Tom Spears, Postmedia Network
First posted: Thursday, January 21, 2016 12:57 PM EST | Updated: Thursday, January 21, 2016 07:36 PM EST
OTTAWA - A scientist who once tried to name a new planet after Xena the Warrior Princess is the same guy who may have found the solar system's "Planet Nine" this week.

Mike Brown is a California Institute of Technology planet hunter.

In 2005, he found a little one far out in the solar system and tried to name it Xena, because he’s a fan of the 1990s TV show, and because planets have names from Greek and Roman myths.

Not so fast, said the International Astronomical Union. As a television heroine, Xena is a fake myth (as opposed to a real myth). They voted instead on Eris, the ancient goddess of discord, which made sense given their infighting.

There had officially been nine planets as of 1930, the year Pluto was discovered.

As telescopes improved, other small, planet-like objects started to show up.

However, astronomers then decided the little planets are a different kind of heavenly body, not real planets. They demoted Pluto, Eris and Ceres to “dwarf planet” in 2006. Bad feeling over Pluto is still simmering.

Now Brown and Caltech colleague Konstantin Batygin have found evidence of a planet 10 times bigger than Earth, orbiting far beyond Pluto in a dark region called the Kuiper Belt.

They call it Planet Nine for now. They haven’t seen it, but they observed the movements of other Kuiper Belt objects and reasoned that something massive is exerting a strong gravitational pull on them. Brown hasn’t mentioned Xena this time. Or Xena’s sidekick, Gabrielle.

He still won a final victory in his Xena battle. He persuaded the International Astronomical Union to name Eris’s moon Dysnomia, after the mythical Greek spirit of lawlessness. Xena was played by actress Lucy Lawless.

tspears@postmedia.com

twitter.com/TomSpears1
Planet hunter, Xena lover discovers 'Planet Nine' | World | News | Toronto Sun
 
selfsame
#3
If this planet is so big and so distant ( : 5,000 times bigger than Pluto and billions of miles farther away), then it does not belong to our but to another solar system.

It can't be billions of miles away and the sun have gravity influence on it, so as to draw it to orbit around the sun as a planet of the solar system.
I don't think the sun's electromagnetic field may reach to billions of miles away; this is a weak probability.

The sun's gravity can hold Planet Neptune, which is so huge a planet; but behind it by billions of miles ... this cannot be taken as certain.

This is what I think, and God is the All-Knowing.
 
Ron in Regina
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by selfsame View Post

If this planet is so big and so distant ( : 5,000 times bigger than Pluto and billions of miles farther away), then it does not belong to our but to another solar system...

If this planet ('bout 10x the size of the Earth?) and is
orbiting (though at a great distance) around our Sun,
then how could it belong to another solar system?
 
DaSleeper
+1
#5  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by selfsame View Post


The sun's gravity can hold Planet Neptune, which is so huge a planet; but behind it by billions of miles ... this cannot be taken as certain.

This is what I think, and God is the All-Knowing.

Looks like you and your god don't know f uck all about physics and gravity ...

Here have a sammich..
 
Ludlow
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by selfsame View Post

If this planet is so big and so distant ( : 5,000 times bigger than Pluto and billions of miles farther away), then it does not belong to our but to another solar system.

It can't be billions of miles away and the sun have gravity influence on it, so as to draw it to orbit around the sun as a planet of the solar system.
I don't think the sun's electromagnetic field may reach to billions of miles away; this is a weak probability.

The sun's gravity can hold Planet Neptune, which is so huge a planet; but behind it by billions of miles ... this cannot be taken as certain.

This is what I think, and God is the All-Knowing.

Perhaps you may want to stick with spamming your book shyt selfslime. That was kind of a stupid thing to post.
 
darkbeaver
+1
#7
It's thought to be a gas giant so the evidence rather than solid is gaseous.
 
Ludlow
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

It's thought to be a gas giant so the evidence rather than solid is gaseous.

Remind you of anyone?
 
selfsame
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

If this planet ('bout 10x the size of the Earth?) and is
orbiting (though at a great distance) around our Sun,
then how could it belong to another solar system?

Our sun is not very large in comparison to other suns in the universe; it may be considered small or medium in size: not a large sun.
It has a limited power of gravity: it can draw such planets as our present planets; the most remote is Neptune and it is a very large planet.

The electromagnetic field of the sun and its extension ... this will limit the gravity of the sun which will not be without limit.

The planets orbit the sun in the confines of this electromagnetic field, and therefore, the planets are almost orbiting in the equatorial plane of the sun.



All the planets circle around the sun in the same direction of the rotation of the sun around itself, and all the planets are situated about the equatorial plane of the sun in relation to its rotation and its electromagnetic field which will determine the extent of the planets drawn to the sun.



http://www.quran-ayat.com/universe/n...round_the_Sun_
Last edited by selfsame; Jan 22nd, 2016 at 03:37 PM..
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#10
I think we should name the new planet for something sacred to Muslims.

What do you think, selfshame, should we go with "AK-47" or "suicide belt?"
 
Curious Cdn
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

I think we should name the new planet for something sacred to Muslims.

What do you think, selfshame, should we go with "AK-47" or "suicide belt?"

How about "Iamavictim"
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#12
Quote:

"We could have stayed quiet and quietly spent the next five years searching the skies ourselves and hoping to find it. But I would rather somebody find it sooner, than me find it later," astronomer Mike Brown told The Associated Press.

Wait a minute. . . I thought Mike Brown was dead.
 
Curious Cdn
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by selfsame View Post

Our sun is not very large in comparison to other suns in the universe; it may be considered small or medium in size: not a large sun.
It has a limited power of gravity: it can draw such planets as our present planets; the most remote is Neptune and it is a very large planet.

The electromagnetic field of the sun and its extension ... this will limit the gravity of the sun which will not be without limit.

The planets orbit the sun in the confines of this electromagnetic field, and therefore, the planets are almost orbiting in the equatorial plane of the sun.



All the planets circle around the sun in the same direction of the rotation of the sun around itself, and all the planets are situated about the equatorial plane of the sun in relation to its rotation and its electromagnetic field which will determine the extent of the planets drawn to the sun.



The Universe and the Quran 2

Are you sure that those planets are spinning in the right direction, Sesame? What does the Prophet say about that? If you have to fart out of the left side, wipe your @ss with your left hand then old Moe must have decreed that they can only go one way?
 
Blackleaf
#14
The influence of the Sun's gravity is thought to extend to 2 light years away - that's about 12 trillion miles. Pluto is a mere 3.6 billion miles from the Sun (about 40 times further away from the Sun than Earth is). It is entirely possible there is another planet beyond Pluto that is still well within the Sun's gravitational reach.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#15
Oh, goody! I hope the clueless Muzzie and the ignorant Brit start debating physics.

I'll need a BIG tub of popcorn for that!
 
Blackleaf
#16
Oh look. Professor Brian Cox has showed up.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#17
Do tell us everything you know about gravity, Princess Swallows.

Better yet, tell us everything you know about gravity (and everything else) that's correct. Make a pretty short post.
 
Blackleaf
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Do tell us everything you know about gravity, Princess Swallows.

An Englishman discovered it.

It is, by far, the weakest of all the known forces. This is shown by the fact, when you throw a ball into the air, the entire force of Earth is required to pull it back to the ground. And, as we all can see, a simple little bar magnet can overcome the gravity of the entire Earth.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#19
Speaking of drones,it's been a while since the lefties have been shrieking and hand-wringing. Wonder what happened.
 
DaSleeper
#20
Was Galileo English?
 
darkbeaver
#21
Quote:

=DaSleeper;2236829]Looks like you and your god don't know f uck all about physics and gravity ...

Well he's in good company because most of the hacks sold to the public as SCIENTISTS are rubber stamping underachievers captured by the establihment monolith and thier best and only work is performed in preservation of the junkish fiction of the uniformist liars and fornicators.
 
Blackleaf
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

Was Galileo English?


No. He was from the Duchy of Florence. He was born there in 1564, two months before Shakespeare was born.
 
selfsame
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

What do you think, selfshame,

Tecumshame is more proper for you.

Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Are you sure that those planets are spinning in the right direction

The sun spins around its axis from right to left, and it pulls the planets to circle around it in the same direction from right to left.

"Know that every flaming object is stationary in its place, but it rotates around its axis because of its central heat; its rotation is from right to left. While every cold object does not rotate around its axis, because there is no heat inside it that cause its movement, but merely it revolves around the object to which it is attracted by gravity; and its revolution, too, is from right to left; because the attracting object is rotating in this way."

The Universe and the Quran 2
 
CDNBear
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by selfsame View Post

The Universe and the Quran 2

Now there's a space oddity.
 
Curious Cdn
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by selfsame View Post

Tecumshame is more proper for you.



The sun spins around its axis from right to left, and it pulls the planets to circle around it in the same direction from right to left.

"Know that every flaming object is stationary in its place, but it rotates around its axis because of its central heat; its rotation is from right to left. While every cold object does not rotate around its axis, because there is no heat inside it that cause its movement, but merely it revolves around the object to which it is attracted by gravity; and its revolution, too, is from right to left; because the attracting object is rotating in this way."

The Universe and the Quran 2

So, what does Allah say when you view the Solar System from the Sun's other pole?

As I thought, the authors of the Quran were not the brightest.
 
spaminator
#26
Could we stand on Planet 9? Heck no
York University expert answers questions about the mysterious new planet
By Maryam Shah , Toronto Sun
First posted: Saturday, January 23, 2016 04:32 PM EST | Updated: Saturday, January 23, 2016 10:56 PM EST
TORONTO - How did we miss this?

Two researchers at the California Institute of Technology speculate that a ninth planet could exist in the outer reaches of the solar system.

We turned to Paul Delaney, senior lecturer in astrophysics and astronomy at York University, to explain.

1) What is Planet 9?

“They’re speculating that a number of objects that are located in the outer solar system ... (have) got all the characteristics of being influenced by the existence of a much larger, more massive object, and they’ve now speculated that that object is about 10 times the mass of the Earth .. and they’re suggesting it could be (Planet 9).”

2) Why do we not know for sure?

“Haven’t seen it. In science, you’ve got to be able to say ‘You see that little point there? That’s it!’ And be able to define its various characteristics.

The gravitational influence of this object is what is giving rise to the orbital parameters of a number of objects in the outer solar system.

And while that is quite persuasive, it is certainly short of saying Planet Nine exists. Until we can actually literally take a photograph of it and at least confirm the existence of a point that is comparable in size to what they’re suggesting.”

3) If it is a gas giant, could we stand on it?

“Oh heck no. No, no, no. Definitely not. We’re not talking about any of the terrestrial planets. You can walk around on Pluto, that would be fine. But no, you’ll never be able to walk on the surface of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune and if our speculation is correct, Planet Nine is similarly unobtainable as far as walking on the surface.”

4) How do we go looking for it?

“We’re talking about an object that is, give or take, 100 billion kilometres from the Sun. And it’s orbiting with a period of between 10,000 and 20,000 years. So it’s going to be faint, because it’s so far away, and it will move very slowly because of its distance from the Sun. So both of those attributes conspire to make it a big challenge from observational astronomers to find it.”

5) Could we physically reach it?

“Getting there physically with a probe with our current technology? You and I will not see that day, I’m sorry. We just don’t have the technology. We can’t get a spacecraft moving fast enough to get out there in a reasonable period of time and expect the spacecraft to still be fully functional.”

Note: This interview has been condensed for space.
This artistic rendering provided by California Institute of Technology shows the distant view from Planet Nine back towards the sun. The planet is thought to be gaseous, similar to Uranus and Neptune. (R. Hurt/Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/Courtesy of California Institute of Technology via AP)

Could we stand on Planet 9? Heck no | Toronto & GTA | News | Toronto Sun
 
selfsame
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

So, what does Allah say when you view the Solar System from the Sun's other pole?

As I thought, the authors of the Quran were not the brightest.

Certainly, you are the brightest burger masticating one. So keep chewing, and tell us some of your knowledge.
 
Blackleaf
#28
Come in #PlanetNine

BBC News
21 January 2016


You've been suggesting names for a possible ninth planet in the Solar System

US astronomers claim to have strong evidence that there is a ninth planet in our Solar System.

Scientists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) say there are no direct observations to confirm its presence yet.

But if proven to exist, the new planet would have 10 times the mass of Earth (Jupiter's mass is 318 times that of Earth).

You've given the boffins a helping hand by suggesting possible names.



A recently departed Starman gets a mention:



Harrison Jeffrey keeps his options open: "Liking either Bowie or Ziggy - although just calling it Planet Nine has a nice sound about it too".

DJ_Brit continues the musical theme: "How about Planet Bri after @DrBrianMay?"

Ian M. goes for: "Mirage"

Some of you even doubt the existence of Planet Nine:





Derrick says equal opportunities should be taken into consideration:



While viking still has a hankering for an old favourite: "Pluto version .2".

For Mirabai Collamore, it has to be: "Galifrey"

Rosalinda plumps for: "zeus would be a great name for this planet".

Here are some more of your thoughts...






Thanks for sharing your ideas.

Compiled by Bernadette McCague



Come in #PlanetNine - BBC News
 
Curious Cdn
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by selfsame View Post

Certainly, you are the brightest burger masticating one. So keep chewing, and tell us some of your knowledge.

I like that, Sesame .... Babelfish?
 
B00Mer
#30
This BS again?

End of the world? Conspiracy theorists claim new Planet 9 discovery will spark apocalypse

Thought Nibiru was suppose to show up around the end of the Mayan calendar ...

If it does show up, not much we can do about it..
 

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