BC Forest Fires

Curious Cdn
+1
#91
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

To date there have been 138 fires in the province - 34 new ones started in the last two days. This in spite of all the precipitation we've had lately. There are 27 fires of note the largest encompassing 500 hectares but the majority being in the two digit hectare range.
The danger rating for the Boo has been lowered to moderate for now but the fire service informs us that as little as four days of hot windy weather could change that rating to extreme.
Thankfully our area has been blessed with constant showers that are able to soak into the ground. This is our 5th day of cool damp weather.

I hope you stay safe this year and every other one, for that matter. I have witnessed one gigantic forest fire in the Yukon and it was immense and unstoppable. All that you can reasonably do is to get out of it's way, I guess.
 
JLM
#92
I think two bad fire years in a row have a lot of people spooked. Sure it COULD happen a third time in a row, but the odds are it will just be a normal year I think. I suppose we should always be prepared for the worst (clean up around your property and have a sack full of provisions ready for a fast exit) but once that's done no use in worrying about shit that may never happen.
 
JLM
#93
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I remember swimming in Lake Christina in 1994. It was as warm as a bathtub.


Apparently the warmest lake in summer in Canada that is surrounded by trees. (I've never heard it referred to as "Lake Christina" - maybe in Francais)
 
Curious Cdn
#94
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Apparently the warmest lake in summer in Canada that is surrounded by trees. (I've never heard it referred to as "Lake Christina" - maybe in Francais)

... misspelling ...

I believe that it is fed from underground hot springs.
 
MHz
#95
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I seem to recall having a buffalo burger at Expo 67 - just another chunk of meat from what I recall.

It was probably horse, few herds of knotheads went missing about that time.
 
Curious Cdn
#96
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

It was probably horse, few herds of knotheads went missing about that time.

There was a big tainted meat scandal at Expo 67 perpetrated by an Italian Mafia meat supplier who got the exclusive contract ... Reggio Foods.

http://coolopolis.blogspot.com/2016/...r-at-expo.html

An Aislin cartoon at the time had two American tourists in a restaurant with the waiter recommending the "Cheval Mort dans le Sauce Cotroni" and the lady saying:"Sounds good, Ed!"
 
taxslave
+2
#97
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

ANother leftard lie. BCFS plants Alder seedlings raised in nuseries.
 
JLM
#98
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

ANother leftard lie. BCFS plants Alder seedlings raised in nuseries.


Did I hear somewhere that Alder is being used now in the construction of furniture? Or was I having a senior's moment?
 
petros
+2
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

We can buy bison locally as there are a couple of ranches that raise them. Great meat. Elk is another of my favorites.

Elk is by far my favourite meat. I could live on it.
 
petros
+1
#100
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Did I hear somewhere that Alder is being used now in the construction of furniture? Or was I having a senior's moment?

Alder aka birch? Of course. Birch is gorgeous wood. It's a bitch on tools being so course but it's beautiful wood.
 
JLM
#101
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Alder aka birch? Of course. Birch is gorgeous wood. It's a bitch on tools being so course but it's beautiful wood.


Different specie!


"As nouns the difference between birch and alder
is that birch is any of various trees of the genus betula , native to countries in the northern hemisphere while alder is any of several trees or shrubs of the genus alnus , belonging to the birch family".
 
Curious Cdn
+2
#102
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Alder aka birch? Of course. Birch is gorgeous wood. It's a bitch on tools being so course but it's beautiful wood.

I like working poplar. It has a nice, even grain, it's good and strong and it looks good. Birch is very similar.
 
bill barilko
#103
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Did I hear somewhere that Alder is being used now in the construction of furniture? Or was I having a senior's moment?

Cutting strips of heartwood and reassembling them into furniture is becoming popular of course the end product is 40+% glue but who's counting.

Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Alder aka birch? Of course. Birch is gorgeous wood. It's a bitch on tools being so course but it's beautiful wood.

I can't imagine someone being So Ignorant they didn't know the difference between Alder & Birch.

Live & Learn I guess.

Also Alder is commonly called 'Poplar' in rural redneck Canada.
 
Curious Cdn
#104
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilko View Post

Cutting strips of heartwood and reassembling them into furniture is becoming popular of course the end product is 40+% glue but who's counting.
I can't imagine someone being So Ignorant they didn't know the difference between Alder & Birch.
Live & Learn I guess.
Also Alder is commonly called 'Poplar' in rural redneck Canada.

They're not the same species but they are clearly relatives.
 
bill barilko
#105
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

They're not the same species but they are clearly relatives.

How scientific!
 
JLM
#106
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilko View Post

Cutting strips of heartwood and reassembling them into furniture is becoming popular of course the end product is 40+% glue but who's counting.


I can't imagine someone being So Ignorant they didn't know the difference between Alder & Birch.

Live & Learn I guess.

Also Alder is commonly called 'Poplar' in rural redneck Canada.


Your education is sadly lacking, I actually worked? with a guy who couldn't tell a Douglas Fir from a Red Cedar. He was as useless as a cut cat.
 
Hoid
#107
Birch is a true hardwood. I have heard Alder is classified as a hardwood but it is soft.

Out west I have heard Alder referred to as "Swamp Ash"

I did not know it was related to Birch. I thought Birch was related to Oak.
 
JLM
#108
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Birch is a true hardwood. I have heard Alder is classified as a hardwood but it is soft.

Out west I have heard Alder referred to as "Swamp Ash"

I did not know it was related to Birch. I thought Birch was related to Oak.


Growing up I recognized Alder as one of the most useless of all the deciduous trees native in our area. Even as firewood it produces very few BTUs. For firewood well seasoned Arbutus is probably the best of the deciduous trees but don't get caught burning it.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#109
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Growing up I recognized Alder as one of the most useless of all the deciduous trees native in our area. Even as firewood it produces very few BTUs. For firewood well seasoned Arbutus is probably the best of the deciduous trees but don't get caught burning it.

Your Western Alder is not bad for smoking.
 
petros
+1
#110
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Different specie!
"As nouns the difference between birch and alder
is that birch is any of various trees of the genus betula , native to countries in the northern hemisphere while alder is any of several trees or shrubs of the genus alnus , belonging to the birch family".

Read what you posted.

Try this:

Alder is the common name of a genus of flowering plants belonging to the birch family Betulaceae. The genus comprises about 35 species of monoecious trees and shrubs, a few reaching a large size, ... Wikipedia
Scientific name: Alnus
Family: Betulaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Higher classification: Birch family
Rank: Genus
 
petros
+2
#111
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Growing up I recognized Alder as one of the most useless of all the deciduous trees native in our area. Even as firewood it produces very few BTUs. For firewood well seasoned Arbutus is probably the best of the deciduous trees but don't get caught burning it.

For firewood alder/birch is leaps and bounds bette than poplar.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#112
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

For firewood alder/birch is leaps and bounds bette than poplar.

We have sugar maple, oak, walnut, beech, birch, ash, ....
 
petros
+1
#113
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I like working poplar. It has a nice, even grain, it's good and strong and it looks good. Birch is very similar.

Depends on the poplar. Black or white poplar sucks but cottonwood is decent but a again a bitch on tools. Currently I've been working with elm. Gorgeous wood with a light to dark shift in color from the sap wood to the core.

I'm having elm milled this evening into live edge slabs. Buddy has a 42" bar on his chainsaw that does up 36"

My mill will only cut to 20" with a 24" bar.







 
petros
+1
#114
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

We have sugar maple, oak, walnut, beech, birch, ash, ....

All the above but oak and walnut.


We are too high for most oak.
 
Mowich
+1
#115
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I hope you stay safe this year and every other one, for that matter. I have witnessed one gigantic forest fire in the Yukon and it was immense and unstoppable. All that you can reasonably do is to get out of it's way, I guess.

Thank you, CC. We all hope for the same this year. The majority of us here are taking proactive measures such as clearing brush, limbing dead low-hanging branches and of course, making sure that all the current bans are being adhered too.
 
Hoid
#116
Some people out here like alder for fire wood. It has about the same heating value as any other wood out here. I like it small when you don't have to split it. It produces a lot of ash for some reason.

The only wood I find any different out here is hemlock which is wet and weighs about twice what anything else does and doesn't have any more heating value. Hard to split too. So is alder.
 
JLM
#117
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Some people out here like alder for fire wood. It has about the same heating value as any other wood out here. I like it small when you don't have to split it. It produces a lot of ash for some reason.

The only wood I find any different out here is hemlock which is wet and weighs about twice what anything else does and doesn't have any more heating value. Hard to split too. So is alder.


Congratulations, you are finally correct about one thing. Hemlock has to be one of the ugliest woods, heavy, flared butts. Douglas Fir probably rates the highest as far as BTUs are concerned.
 
Hoid
#118
I believe just about any wood growing BC has the same BTU value.

Yew may be an exception.

But even if you plant an eastern chestnut or birch here it is a soft wood when it is grown.
 
JLM
+1
#119
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

I believe just about any wood growing BC has the same BTU value.


Not true.


https://worldforestindustries.com/fo...d-btu-ratings/
 
Jinentonix
#120
Question: Are deciduous patches of forest that are cut down in BC replaced with deciduous trees, or faster growing fir trees for the forestry industry?
 

Similar Threads

0
In The Coastal Forest
by spaminator | Jun 29th, 2015
3
Food Forest
by Sal | Apr 18th, 2014
9
Massive b.c. Forest fires
by VanIsle | Aug 5th, 2009