7 Ways to Save the World (Seven Ways To Save The World)


I think not
#1
The need for more energy and rising greenhouse gases pose a dual challenge to global prosperity. A new vision of conservation—of doing more with less—may be the key.

By Stefan Theil
Newsweek International


Jan. 29, 2007 issue - Forget the old cliche that conserving energy is a form of abstinence—riding bicycles, dimming the lights, lowering the thermostat and taking fewer showers. These days conservation is all about efficiency: getting the same—or better—results from just a fraction of the energy. When a slump in business travelers forced Ulrich Römer to cut costs at his family-owned Hotel am Stadtpark in Hilden, Germany, in 2002, he found that he didn't have to skimp on comfort for his guests. Instead, he replaced hundreds of the hotel's wasteful incandescent light bulbs with energy-saving compact fluorescent ones, getting the same light for 80 percent less power. He bought a state-of-the-art water boiler with a digitally controlled pump, and wrapped insulation around the pipes. Spending about €100,000 on these and other improvements, he slashed his €90,000 fuel and power bill by €60,000—a 60 percent return on investment, year after year after year. As a bonus, the hotel's lower energy needs have reduced its annual carbon emissions by more than 200 metric tons. "For us, saving energy has been very, very profitable," he says. "And most importantly, we're not giving up a single comfort for our guests."

Multiply savings like Römer's across the economy, and it's clear why energy efficiency is no longer an issue just for the eco-fringe, but one of the hottest topics in business—and a way to add billions of dollars to the bottom line. What's more, with the world worried about energy supplies, efficiency turns out to hold the key. As global leaders convene in Davos, Switzerland, this week at the World Economic Forum, they'll discuss power shifts, none of which has more positive potential than the move from squandering to saving energy. "Increasing energy efficiency is the largest, least expensive, most benign, most quickly deployable, least visible, least understood and most neglected way" to meet future energy demand, says energy guru Amory Lovins, head of the Colorado-based Rocky Mountain Institute.

It's an idea whose time has come, though. When oil spiked to more than $70 a barrel last year, oil use in the industrial world fell for the first time in 20 years, according to the International Energy Agency. That shows how quickly energy saving can come back in vogue, but the IEA is cautious. It warns that world energy demand will surge by 50 percent through 2030, outstripping even the most aggressive scenario for boosting alternative sources of energy, like biofuels or solar power. "Even moderate efficiency improvements will contribute more to meeting future demand than all the alternative fuel sources combined," says Paul Waide, an efficiency expert at the IEA.

Efficiency is also a great way to lower carbon emissions and help slow global warming. But the best argument for efficiency is its cost—or, more precisely, its profitability. That's because burgeoning energy demand requires immense investment in new supply, not to mention the drain of rising energy prices. In the IEA's emissions-cutting strategy, consumers and industry would have to invest $2.4 trillion over the next two and a half decades in more-efficient equipment, improved buildings and better-mileage cars. But those investments would slash fuel and electricity bills by an estimated $8.1 trillion and avoid another $3 trillion of investment in oil wells, pipelines and power plants. Each dollar invested in efficiency generates more than $4 in savings, while the "payback period" is usually no more than four years.


No wonder efficiency has moved to the top of the political agenda. On Jan. 10, the European Union unveiled a plan to cut energy use across the continent by 20 percent by 2020. Last March, China mandated a 20 percent increase in energy efficiency by 2020. Even George W. Bush, the Texas oilman, is expected to talk about energy conservation in his State of the Union speech this week.
The good news is that the world is full of proven, cheap ways to save energy. Here are the seven that could have the biggest impact:

INSULATE INSULATE
Space heating and cooling eats up 36 percent of all the world's energy. There's virtually no limit to how much of that can be saved, as prototype "zero-energy homes" in Switzerland and Germany have shown. From polyurethane "outsulation" that's sprayed on the outside of buildings to airtight, "superglazed" windows, there's been a surge in innovative ways of keeping heat in and cold out (or vice versa). State-of-the-art insulation follows the law of increasing returns: if you add enough, you can scale down or even eliminate heating and air-conditioning equipment, lowering costs even before you start saving on utility bills. That's what Texas Instruments discovered in 2005 when it cut construction costs by 30 percent for its new, hyperefficient chip-making plant in Richardson, Texas. The cost savings produced by reflective roofing (the firm junked 100 tons of AC equipment) and letting in more daylight (it reduced lighting costs by 80 percent) helped keep the plant's 1,000 jobs in the United States as well. Studies have shown that green workplaces (ones that don't constantly need to have the heat or AC running) have higher worker productivity and lower sick rates.

CHANGE BULBS
Lighting gobbles up 20 percent of the world's electricity, or the equivalent of roughly 600,000 tons of coal a day. Forty percent of that powers old-fashioned incandescent light bulbs—a 19th-century technology that wastes most of the power it consumes on unwanted heat.

Compact fluorescent lamps, or CFLs, not only use 75 to 80 percent less electricity than incandescent bulbs to generate the same amount of light, but they also last 10 times longer. Phasing old bulbs out by 2030 would save the output of 650 power plants and avoid the release of 700 million tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year. In recent weeks, Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, announced an ambitious plan to sell 100 million bulbs by the end of the year. Each $2 bulb can lead to savings of more than $30 in power and replacement costs down the road. In December, Dutch electronics firm Philips became the first major bulb manufacturer to announce a gradual phaseout of the production of incandescent bulbs. That's great news—of any conservation investment, replacing bulbs produces the quickest and easiest payback.

COMFORT ZONE
Water boilers, space heaters, air conditioners and other heating and cooling technologies have been notoriously inefficient—only a fraction of the energy pumped into them is actually used to change the temperature. The heat pump has altered that equation. It removes ambient heat from the air outside or the ground below and uses it to supply heat to a building or its water supply. In the summer, the system can be reversed to cool buildings as well.

Most new residential buildings in Sweden are already heated with ground-source heat pumps; George W. Bush's ranch in Crawford, Texas, uses one for heating and cooling. These systems consume almost no conventional fuel at all. (They use liquid natural gas in a closed cycle to exchange heat, like Freon in an AC, and need a small electric current to keep the compressors going.) The payback time depends on local fuel costs and building size; in Sweden, it's typically six to nine years for residential construction, and one or two years for large commercial buildings. Several countries have used subsidies to jump-start the market, including Japan, where almost 1 million heat pumps have been installed in the past two years to heat water for showers and hot tubs.


REMAKE FACTORIES
From steel mills and aluminum plants to pulp and paper factories, industry eats up about a third of the world's energy. The opportunities to save are vast. Japanese steelmakers such as Mitsubishi Heavy Industries have been leading the way since the 1980s, cutting energy use by more than 70 percent by using heat from steel furnaces to run turbines that generate electricity. In Ludwigshafen, German chemicals giant BASF runs an interlocking complex of more than 200 chemical factories, where heat produced by one chemical process is used to power the next, or create electricity for another. At the Ludwigshafen site alone, such recycling of heat and energy saves the company €200 million a year and almost half its CO2 emissions. Now BASF is doing the same for new plants in China. "Optimizing energy efficiency is a decisive competitive advantage," says BASF CEO Jürgen Hambrecht.

GREEN DRIVING
A quarter of the world's energy—including two thirds of the annual production of oil—is used for transportation. Some savings come free of charge: you can boost fuel efficiency by 6 percent simply by keeping your car's tires properly inflated (which is why carmakers are working on electronic tire-pressure sensors). Gasoline-electric hybrids like the Toyota Prius or Lexus RX400h improve mileage by a further 20 percent over conventional models. Hybrid technology, however, still costs a premium of as much as $6,000 per car.

Until those prices come down, the better deal is a diesel, which gets up to 40 percent better mileage versus gasoline-powered cars.

Unlike their smoke-belching, slow-igniting ancestors, modern direct-injection diesels like Volkswagen's Passat TDI are clean and powerful, especially now that sulfur-free diesel has finally hit gas stations in the U.S. If by 2025 diesels represent one third of America's personal-vehicle fleet (about what the European figure is today), the U.S. would save 1.5 million barrels of oil a day—the amount it currently imports from Saudi Arabia. What's more, today's diesel engines are certified to run on up to 100 percent biodiesel as well, so the potential to slash oil use and carbon emissions down the road is even greater. Next: the diesel-electric hybrid, under development by Peugeot and DaimlerChrysler.

A BETTER FRIDGE
More than half of all residential power goes into running household appliances, producing a fifth of the world's carbon emissions. And that's true even though manufacturers have already hiked the efficiency of refrigerators and other white goods by as much as 70 percent since the 1980s. More improvements are in the works, promises Henrik Sundstrom, VP for environmental affairs for Sweden's Electrolux, the world's biggest appliance maker, including vacuum insulation for refrigerators and heat pumps for clothes dryers. While it's true that such top-of-the-line technology still carries a hefty premium, prices have been dropping fast for other "green" models. According to an IEA study, if consumers chose those models that would save them the most money over the life of the appliance, they'd cut global residential power consumption (and their utility bills) by 43 percent. Luckily, more than 60 countries have in recent years passed labeling laws that make it easier for consumers to choose wisely. And it works: after the European Union began requiring manufacturers to classify appliances according to power use in 1994, sales of highly efficient Class A appliances soared from close to zero to more than 80 percent today.

JUGGLE PAYMENT
Who says you have to pay for all your conservation investments? "Energy service contractors" will pay for retrofitting in return for a share of the client's annual utility-bill savings. "If I had a company I'd invest in my business, not my infrastructure," says Bernd Romanski, chief operating officer of energy-contracting business Hochtief Facility Management in Frankfurt, Germany; the firm's revenues have been growing by 30 percent each year. Hochtief recently renovated, at its own expense, the student union at cash-strapped Mainz University, splitting the 40 percent utility savings with the university for the next five years. In Beijing, Shenwu Thermal Energy Technology Co. specializes in retrofitting China's fuel-guzzling steel furnaces. Shenwu puts up the initial investment to install a heat exchanger that preheats the air going into the furnace, slashing the client's fuel costs. Shenwu pockets a cut of those savings, so both Shenwu and the client profit. In an even more novel approach, California utilities are paying consumers for "negawatts"—giving out extra rebates for cutting power use by 10 percent or more. California utilities like PG&E benefit by lowering peak electricity demand, which means they can avoid the billion-dollar expense of building additional power plants. There is even talk in California of creating a market to trade negawatts, passing savings along so that other utilities in the state can also avoid new plant construction.


If saving energy is so easy and profitable, why isn't everyone doing it? It has to do with psychology and a lack of information. Most of us tend to look at today's price tag more than tomorrow's potential savings. That holds double for the landlord or developer, who won't actually see a penny of the savings his investment in better insulation or a better heating system might generate. And in today's global real-estate boom, in which even a drafty hovel can fetch a fortune, efficiency standards rank unsurprisingly low on the list. "The savings rarely come in single, obvious chunks, but are hidden in a thousand little things," says Stefan Thomas of Germany's Wuppertal Climate Institute. In many people's minds, he says, conservation is still associated with abstinence and self-denial. Many environmentalists still push that view.

Smart governments can help nudge the market in the right direction. The EU's 1994 law on labeling was such a success that it extended the same idea to entire buildings last year. To boost the market value of efficiency, all new buildings are required to have an "energy pass" detailing power and heating consumption. Countries like Japan and Germany have successively tightened building codes, requiring an increase in insulation levels but leaving it up to builders to decide how to meet them. Tax breaks help owners of older buildings to retrofit. Today, the market for low-energy building materials has grown so big in Europe and Japan that many supplies—such as windows—come cheaper in the high-tech insulated version than in the old-fashioned, energy-wasting style. (And there's a boom in the insulation business to boot.)

A gradually rising fuel-efficiency minimum would do the same to vehicles; as an added carrot, Amory Lovins suggests a subsidy to help poorer drivers get their clunky old gas guzzlers off the road. Technically, since most energy savings pay for themselves, subsidies shouldn't be necessary. "But often they're the bait to get consumers to start thinking," says Thomas. Once the market is up and running, he says, they can be dropped—as in the Netherlands, where sales of efficient appliances remained high even after a temporary subsidy expired.

The most powerful incentives, of course, will come from the market itself. Over the past year, sky-high fuel prices have focused minds on efficiency like never before. Relentless pressure to cut costs has finally forced more companies to do some math on their energy use. Recent oil- and gas-price hikes by Russia have started to force some of the world's most energy-inefficient economies—Ukraine and Belarus—to think about efficiency measures. Even Russian energy giant Gazprom has caught on to efficiency, lured by the fledgling market in carbon credits. In a deal with Germany's Dresdner Bank announced last week, Gazprom plans to fix leaks in its infamously decrepit gas pipelines and replace its aging pumps and compressors, not only to cut energy waste but to generate up to €2 billion in carbon credits.

Will it be enough? With global demand and emissions rising so fast, we may not have any choice but to try. Efficient technology is here now, proven and cheap. Compared with all our other options, it's the biggest, easiest and most profitable bang for the buck, by far.

With Akiko Kashiwagi in Tokyo, Quindlen Krovatin in Beijing and Stephen Glain in Washington
© 2007 Newsweek, Inc.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16725521/site/newsweek/
 
Gonzo
#2
I like all those ideas, but sadly allot rely on average citizens getting of their asses and making a change. We see more SUV's on the road then ever, even though we KNOW that they are gas guzzlers and are polluting the air.
I saw on the news where a guy built a fridge that was in the floor. When he wanted something to eat he'd push a butting and a tube would come up with the food, not having to open a fridge door and let all the cool air get out. This way the fridge hardly had to charge up and cool the space down again. Brilliant!
 
Northboy
#3
Good article...great sentiment....
 
look3467
#4
Peace>>>AJ
Last edited by look3467; Jan 26th, 2007 at 12:56 PM..Reason: Meant for a private mesage.
 
I think not
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Gonzo View Post

I like all those ideas, but sadly allot rely on average citizens getting of their asses and making a change.

I think it's more lack of getting informed than anything else.

Changing your light bulbs would drop your electric bill 15%.

Change your appliance to Energy Star ratings. Drop it another 30%.

It really doesn't take alot.

Here's an interesting piece of information. If every American household changed just ONE incandescent bulb to Energy Star, it would be equivalent of removing 800,000 cars off the road.

http://www.epa.gov/region01/ra/colum..._20061004.html
 
L Gilbert
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Gonzo View Post

I like all those ideas, but sadly allot rely on average citizens getting of their asses and making a change. We see more SUV's on the road then ever, even though we KNOW that they are gas guzzlers and are polluting the air.
I saw on the news where a guy built a fridge that was in the floor. When he wanted something to eat he'd push a butting and a tube would come up with the food, not having to open a fridge door and let all the cool air get out. This way the fridge hardly had to charge up and cool the space down again. Brilliant!

Yeah, damned expensive too.
About SUVs. Nelson has a population of about 15,000. I don't know how many in outlying areas. One could probably get away with sayingmaybe 6 or 7000 are drivers. Minivans and SUVs are by far the largest groups of vehicle types around here. What's more is that there are 3 Hummers (that I've noticed) around here which have to be the worst guzzlers invented. SUVs are expensive in comparison to other vehicles. It isn't just getting average citizens to wake up because they prefer to get more bang for the buck, anyway: it's getting the wealthier people to smarten up.
 
L Gilbert
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by look3467 View Post

Peace>>>AJ

Yeah, that'll save the planet.
 
look3467
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by L Gilbert View Post

Yeah, that'll save the planet.

Clairvoyant too huh?
Or are we speaking of the "" of the matter?

Peace>>>AJ
 
#juan
#9
Good post ITN

The time has long since passed when we can drive the biggeset, worst, gas guzzlers just because we can afford it. We all have be responsible for spaceship Earth. My next car will be a hybrid though I would dearly love a zippy sports car. My grand kids are my conscience...we have to leave a better world for them....and theirs.
 
jjaycee98
#10
[largest groups of vehicle types around here. What's more is that there are 3 Hummers (that I've noticed) around here which have to be the worst guzzlers invented. SUVs are expensive in comparison to other vehicles. It isn't just getting average citizens to wake up because they prefer to get more bang for the buck, anyway: it's getting the wealthier people to smarten up.[/quote]


In Grande Prairie you can not go out on the roads without seeing at least three Hummers. Must be hundreds of them. Granted that some people live and work where they have need of 4 wheel drive and perhaps Crew capacity. Lot's of them here are just the family car!
Last edited by jjaycee98; Jun 22nd, 2007 at 08:14 AM..Reason: Clarify
 
I think not
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

Good post ITN

The time has long since passed when we can drive the biggeset, worst, gas guzzlers just because we can afford it. We all have be responsible for spaceship Earth. My next car will be a hybrid though I would dearly love a zippy sports car. My grand kids are my conscience...we have to leave a better world for them....and theirs.

I couldn't agree more with you on this one #juan. Three car leases back to back have been an SUV. I won't lie, I like the way an SUV drives and I feel alot safer. My current lease expires next month. I am seriously considering a hybrid vehicle OR an E85. We have enough stations, one right by my house that has E85 fuel. The hybrid does cost more, usually $6,000 more than a regular gas guzzler.

In the Solar Power thread I had mentioned (as did you) that making a few changes goes a long way.

Problem is, how do we inform/convince a population?
 
MikeyDB
#12
ITN

Like most issues ITN, Canadians won't tolerate being informed until their being bled at the gas pumps or when the Brinks truck comes in with the heating oil tanker....with Colpy riding shotgun of course
 
typingrandomstuff
#13
How to inform/converge such a population into gradual accepting of the past and the future events of such things

Some things following the common yet grand ideas of I Think Not

See especially 3.

1. a) Support companies on making green by funding and fundraising. I remove the price control because price control will make the markets into chaos. For every price control shift, the whole market have to be redifined. Sudden changes shifts making money hard and unstable markets lead to downfalls similar to the credit crunch of the United States of America. So, I will support funding and fundraising.

b) Encouraging the people to use renewable resources
Funds and physical help and aide to encourage more people to use reneweable resources. Really like the solar grid one. Great Job! Try to minimal the law force in renewablity.

c) discourage people with wealth to buy their items of non-renewable and release toxins as a shame or to buy items of non-renewable as the people collect old cars. Just for the hobby of collecting non-renewable resources, but not much of a use.

2. Redefined green--in the past, many catalysts are non-recyclable, they often release toxic specimens and when they solve a specific problem, other complication occurs. The catalysts themselves are not recyclable. If we use catalysts such as that, more complication and junk piles up.

Therefore, to be green is to be as close to nature as one can. This means to be green is to increase effiency and when the product is made, no or few toxics (lower or equal to insert limit here or below measurements) is released and the product after use is recyclable. An example of such is biodegradable products with minimum toxins released. If we do more research on such products, then we will have a better time. The degradable factor should be the regular melting time for a dead corps and it should not release any harmful products during productivity or degradable time.

3. To reach such products and research, we need funds and support for the lab people. When there is a more greener item (item that is closer to "do not release toxins and is recyclable") is formed, the government should support the research and products in some way.

-A field of encouragement for such research will be creating such resources by using the toxins we released to the environment. As you know, sodium and chlorine is posionus when they are apart. When they are together, they are harmless or forms the classic salt. So we can try and try to derrive the toxins into biodegradable products until the earth is balanced. Meaning the world will be organic again.


4. What to do during research. Try to use as less energy as you can and encourage people to exercise and do it in hands, arms, feet, and by their own energy instead of using the cities and going about in others. (Otherwise try to not be lazy). Try to avoid using complicated lab made synthetic product, inorganic ones and use it only for big things and extremely hard things. Use plastics to hold a lot of stuff and use paper bag to do groceries. Use car for long distances bike for short distances.

ExplainationsExplainationsExplainationsExplainatio ns
What is 1. to 4. all mean
If items with excess materials are released, we may only take certains before we die. People are made in a way that it may survive nature and take in some of the excess things. We have oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, phosporous, water and others in us. However, when we take too many of either one such as water, we die. That is the same as the factories. If too many of the excess and unatural toxins are released, then the earth will be unbalanced and we will die. In order for that to happen, one of the materials must be gone. In our case, it is the Carbon dioxide from coal and other similar minerals releasing CO2. This makes the minerals extremely expensive and tends to send our industries more into bankruptcy. If one day no one try to follow these, the price of the coal related products will be so expensive that all of the markets will be very downward.

To prevent such imbalances, we should try to invent useful items that are biodegradable, do not release unwanted toxins and others in its death and try to encourage people to not be lazy. That way during harsh times we may live, and our money may be always steady. Also please follow 1.'s instructions or edit it a bit.


5. Energy Emissions
We currently use things that release CO2 and methane and all that jazz a lot. What will be best to do is to use a revised edition of solar flare flowers(solar panels), hyro-electric, fuel cells, and the almost flawless wind power and the exercise gym. Try to build them as closer to the new green and try to use it only for the extreme cases.

Solar takes a lot of space, however try to build solar panels to absorb reflections of light and thermal energy by using mirrors and a outer plastic semi-sphere around it. It also release toxins during production.

Hyrdro-electric is too waistful. I saw how they build the three gorges dam. They sucked out all the water into a basin, build on dry land and then took them years to complete and put water in. No wonder so many animals are harmed and people's lives are disrupted. Where would you put the drained water? What about the people around it? We may just use the old slow spin wheel ones and add a few bugs base on the old water wheels. After build, could just make it wide enough to dip in water and only needs two stick to suspend it. That will take maximum 1 year. To control the power, we may turn on and off of the storages of power.

Nuclear reactors. Uranium is not very great because the waste if not the danger concerns you. Although I do not recommend nuclear, if are going to use nuclear, choose elements that decomposes in short amount of time and try not to store it near water, ground water or anything else please. Polluting the ground water leaves us fewer cleaner water to drink. (unless you can clean groundwater to only groundwater with the new green method). Store it underground, if you must in a place away from earthquakes and approve the place quick. Approve the places to store nuclear waste quick. Quick. Very Quick.

Wind power will always chop birds unless we can build something that goes with the thermals and wind at the same time.

Update:

1 is by kite attached to a merry-go-round:

http://www.kiteship.com/
Kite ship company
http://www.sequoiaonline.com/blogs/htm/progetto_eng.htm
KWG project


2 is ballons filled with helium

from the monitor.

Hyrogen fuel cells should be build in a way that the only substance released is water. The products of hydrogen do not have to be only hydrogen and oxygen. We may use the remainging products of one item such as the product of methane to form hydrogen and the excess product of another to form oxygen and then combine the two together to form the final product. These hydrogen fuel cells are best at bringing effiency and prevent the smell that many combustion engines have. During these changes, I believe a lot of energy may be released. And the final product of hydrogen fuel cell should always be H2O or some sort of organic or biodegradable materials

Geothermal: I think the best extraction of geothermal is to return the jets of water or lava to its original place. For example, the jets of stream water will sprout out and land at nearby land. As long the machine take the heat of the earth streams that sprout out naturally and return the water to the nearby land or proper place, geothermal should be okay. It should be with lava too. If it do not, the land will change shape and that may cause awful side effects.

The Exercise Gym.
Submit by cartoon and classic stories. When people exercise, we may store their energy into the machine and their exercise will produce electricity. This is the best form!

Orange juice, salty water and electrolytes.
Orange juice, salty water and other solutions when submerged with copper and zinc create electricity too! It is stable and very cheap!


--Diagrams coming Soon!--


6. Advertise the possibilities. Let everyone know and understand in all sorts of language and levels! Don't be greedy!

--More to come! Got to thank Renewable Bioresources Scope and Modification for Non-Food Applications as reference! and all the actions!

It's all how you look at it.
Last edited by typingrandomstuff; Aug 16th, 2007 at 11:59 AM..Reason: Rechecking facts
 
typingrandomstuff
#14
7. Show people how saving money of bulbs(seem expensive at first) may get people much a better result in the future in terms of funds and their effiency! Take West Port for example!
Last edited by typingrandomstuff; Jun 30th, 2007 at 01:17 PM..Reason: A little more to add...
 
typingrandomstuff
#15
8. Use the products that are rotted from natural farm product such as rotten apple as soil. This soil may be carried anywhere to farms and other places to be used as fertilizers. If combusted, it will release excess things, which will form imbalance in nature and growing threat similar to global warming.

9. There are simple catalysts such as sugar and corn that people may use to clean the environment. It doesn't have to be complicated.

10. The usage of plants and the misconceptions.

What plants do

Plants do make oxygen and carbon dioxide. The classic plant thing is always around postings and talks. Plants use water, carbon dioxide, and sunlight plus its own energy to combine water, sunlight, and carbon dioxide into sugar. These sugars first release oxygen during the time with the sun. As the sun sets, the plants release the excess carbon dioxide it takes during the daylight. Since plants use carbon dioxide, water, and sunlight to make sugars to make itself live, it acts like a filter. Overall, it reduce partially of the carbon dioxide. To get a clue, search photosyntesis in google. Link coming soon! Some other plants have special filtering effects such as turning the NH3 into their energy similar to photosynthesis (from biology 11 of Mc-Graw Hill)

Misconceptions

It is because it reduce partially of the carbon dioxide and many people do exaggerate, that sometimes environmentalist protesters think the plants only make oxygen. Then the innocent neutral viewpoint people heard this and believed this. When the non-environmentalists figure out it also let Carbon dioxide in the night, they start to say plants do not help at all and many people continued to hate plants. In truth, plants reduced partially of the carbon dioxide.

What to Do

Plant as much plants that can reduce CO2 and methane and related car byproducts in empty spaces of the road or city.
or
Recover the earth and have a sudden stable thing into bliss.

Everyone knows at different soil, there are different plants. To repair the areas with broken industries, we may buy the land and decorate it with the plants that exsisted at the past soil. For example, if a factory was bankrupted, another rich company bought it. The company may reorganize and decorate the whole thing and leave spaces for soil. When these spaces are made, people may then plant the nessisary plants. We plant the artic plants in the arctic. Plants the rainforest plants in the B.C. In cities, try to get spaces for plants. If it is a squished place, we may live in indivdiual homes of suburbs. In the town center, there might be a lot of shops. To get to a shop or anywhere, try to go by through walking or the town's Vehicle. I imagine it to be a hovercraft that allow people to go anywhere and stop at anywhere. It may have 8 routes. One go east. One go west. One go north. One go south. One go northeast. One go northwest. One go southeast. One go southwest. There should be multiple hovercrafts coming at every 10 minutes for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. If the 10 minute limit failed due to reason, it is okay. If it is not reason, it will not be okay and the person must be punished. That way, we have more areas in the town center and the idea of urban expansion and natural harmony is reached. Suburbs homes are pretty cheap as long as you read I Think Not and the whole thread with some thinking. It may seem expensive at first, but afterwards it will save you a lot.

This is to prevent the squishing of people to cause unwanted voilence such as the gun voilence and many other mishaps in the uncared parts of Alberta.

The hovercraft may be expensive, however, that will be used only in the future. Parking the hovercraft can use lines to suspend it like a tent.

Will not work once overpopulation takes over. When that happens, either form a war or sacrifice. War is random selection of people killed and sacrifice is people kill people for other sort of ideals. I personally perfer to avoid them although I know they have their uses such as peace for growth.

Diagrams coming soon!

11.
Get your skills and degrees to Ford and other car company and help and convince them to build better engines of cars and vans! Introduce people to the hybrid and use top speed for hybrid. Convince the owner to make such cars with the still standard features and looks and functions of Ford!

The car industry of Ford have ethanol selling cars and many people decide to use ethanol to save the greenhouse gases by 30%. I've been thinking and I found that it is because America is one of the leading industries that many people may copy what it do. However, I do not really think all cars will use ethanol ones because Japanese cars with their efficiency and successful hybrid make a very grand value in the market too. The best now is for someone with a degree and a lot of skills to go into America's ford company and revise a new edition of the car plans with the ford's old features kept to save the planet. That way, a major chunk will be reduced. I am trying to get that degree and that skills.

12. Make factories and other funds of products to be sold to the world market at low rate and great benefits that are as tough as any other. Make a product with the function of a plastic bag, yet very green and cheap and well used in the market. It is from this way that the ethanol is a little bit more common than the other resources

13. Work as consultants to help people in reducing pollutions. This way it will not be fighting for people in the whole world for loyalties within companies. Less conflicts and more work done.

14. Submarine, Airplane, and tank engines may be used by hydrogen fuel cell or related hydrogen fuel cells. They may also used by other sources such as the sources mentioned in 5.

15. Get an educational and skill degree of mechanics, products, and business and then try to follow 13. and 14. and the other numbers mentioned.


Gas Addiction
how to get rid of it

Part I-Cars

1. Perferable that cars burn ethanol instead of gas with electric hybrid breaks that last longer than two years if people are that addicted to the gas.

2. Use fuels similar to ethanol with more electric components. Each car's building should be as electric as possible with safety ratings and speed. A car's company's building and model will remain as they wish to be. The best will only have their engine changed. The car company should still be able to have their quality and price.

3. Try electric cars with top safety ratings and speed. Again, if that is not common, there must be somehow to rebuild the car into that safety rating and speed. The best is an electric hybrid car. A car with electric as main and hybrid breaks that last longer. Speed for an electric hybrid is in most successful hybrid cars. A rough understanding can be found in how stuff works.com in hybrids.

PartII-Industrial powers and household

I found a real company with links to their production. If people can use that similar sort of building, they will save money. The whole point is to get electricity by disturbing nature as low as possible with the end product being the product you took to make it. That way people do not have to refine or clean up the stuff and waste more energy. The product also may be different and be reused as something else like sluge of sewage for some farming purposes.

18. READ the whole thread and THINK very hard!
More coming soon!
Last edited by typingrandomstuff; Aug 16th, 2007 at 12:01 PM..
 
L Gilbert
#16
Now that CO² has had doubt cast on it as a GHG, I feel compelled to give a list of a few other GHGs:

nitrous oxide,
methane,
hydrofluorocarbons,
hydrogen,
VOCs (volatile organic compounds like vaporizing fuel, incomplete combustion of fuel, alcohols, aldehydes, organic acids, biomass burning, etc.)
carbon tetrachloride,
carbon tetrafluoride,
oarbon monoxide,
ozone,
methyl chloroform,
perfluoroethane,
sulfur hexafluoride,
trifluoromethyl
sulfur pentafluoride,

and there are more. Um, one might note that only a few of those are also emitted naturally and some don't exist normally in nature at all.
Last edited by L Gilbert; Feb 9th, 2007 at 02:39 PM..
 
L Gilbert
#17
We contribute unnaturally occuring GHGS. That adds to the problem. But those synthetics I mentioned aren't the only synthetics we add to the environment. There are a plethora of myriads of benzene compounds alone we let loose that just love causing cancers of many kinds in critters that walk, swim, and fly. Benzene is a carbon structure. Then there's fluorine, sulfur, etc. compounds. Ain't chemistry neat?
 
#juan
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not View Post

I think it's more lack of getting informed than anything else.

Changing your light bulbs would drop your electric bill 15%.

Change your appliance to Energy Star ratings. Drop it another 30%.

It really doesn't take alot.

Here's an interesting piece of information. If every American household changed just ONE incandescent bulb to Energy Star, it would be equivalent of removing 800,000 cars off the road.

http://www.epa.gov/region01/ra/colum..._20061004.html

Without trying to rain on the parade, there is a cost on all these good ideas.

1. The new florescent lights don't fit in every fixture and Joe Average will at best, change those he can change.

2. New appliances are not cheap either and it will take a lot of selling to get people buy new before the old one wears out.

.3. The cost of a hybrid vehicle over a non-hybrid vehicle is about $6000.00. I can see the value in this sort of vehicle, but it is going to take some selling to convince Joe Average.
 
typingrandomstuff
#19
#juan, pardon on this kind of language, but read my posts carefully. Read my posts carefully. Read my posts carefully and think hard. Think hard. Think hard. Think very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very hard. These post ideas are to be linked together and put together. It says in my 1) point a) and b) to lower costs for people who buys items that are renewable. And not every hybrid is that costly. It may seem at first, however when you get the daily savings, then the original bulb with green will save you a lot of money. If you still do not understand, then I will have to give you the calculations of the two bulbs, the comparison of saving gas of a hybrid and a nonhybrid.
Last edited by typingrandomstuff; Feb 10th, 2007 at 07:16 PM..
 
typingrandomstuff
#20
Read my posts in 7 ways to Save the World and think very hard!
 
jjaycee98
#21
largest groups of vehicle types around here. What's more is that there are 3 Hummers (that I've noticed) around here which have to be the worst guzzlers invented. SUVs are expensive in comparison to other vehicles. It isn't just getting average citizens to wake up because they prefer to get more bang for the buck, anyway: it's getting the wealthier people to smarten up.[/quote]


In Grande Prairie you can not go out on the roads without seeing at least three. Must be hundreds of them. Granted that some people live and work where they have need of 4 wheel drive and perhaps Crew capacity. Lot's of them here are just the family car! ]

3 hummers parked at Canadian Tire, One at the 10 Pin bowling, and 2 at Safeway. Granted that you need 4 wheel drive just to navigate the streets-they are sooooo bad. Many people just feel safer with the security of 4 wheel drive, but all these Hummers in town is purely Bull S--t, ostentatious showing off.
Last edited by jjaycee98; Feb 10th, 2007 at 07:34 PM..Reason: Not my quote- or orginal
 
typingrandomstuff
#22
The good and bad thing is, car theft may become popular that people steals that expensive hummer.
 
#juan
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by typingrandomstuff View Post

#juan, pardon on this kind of language, but read my posts carefully. Read my posts carefully. Read my posts carefully and think hard. Think hard. Think hard. Think very very very very very very very very very very very very very very very hard. These post ideas are to be linked together and put together. It says in my 1) point a) and b) to lower costs for people who buys items that are renewable. And not every hybrid is that costly. It may seem at first, however when you get the daily savings, then the original bulb with green will save you a lot of money. If you still do not understand, then I will have to give you the calculations of the two bulbs, the comparison of saving gas of a hybrid and a nonhybrid.


typingrandomstuff

Never mind the feeble attempt at sarcasm. I worked thirty odd years as a professional engineer and I don't need the likes of you to explain what, grade 7 math? That is about all that is required to figure out the savings one might expect by changing to fluorescent from incandescent bulbs.

I just bought a Toyota Camry hybrid. The cost difference over an equally equipped non-hybrid Camry was about six thousand dollars. I looked a other hybrids and the cost difference over the non-hybrid version of whatever make was similar.

My point, however, was that people get into the habit of buying new appliances, cars, etc. when the old ones wear out. All these savings are available if you are willing to pay the capital cost of the new energy saving models.

How long will it take to amortise the extra cost with the savings? Time will tell.


vbmenu_register("postmenu_783685", true);
 
lena
#24
don't FART
 
L Gilbert
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by typingrandomstuff View Post

Read my posts in 7 ways to Save the World and think very hard!

Geeez. More sandbox behavior with the big words.
 
L Gilbert
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

typingrandomstuff

Never mind the feeble attempt at sarcasm. I worked thirty odd years as a professional engineer and I don't need the likes of you to explain what, grade 7 math? That is about all that is required to figure out the savings one might expect by changing to fluorescent from incandescent bulbs.

Actually, Juan I think that'd be arithmetic. Quite linear.

Quote:

I just bought a Toyota Camry hybrid. The cost difference over an equally equipped non-hybrid Camry was about six thousand dollars. I looked a other hybrids and the cost difference over the non-hybrid version of whatever make was similar.

I think the things are hideous, but that's just me. I don't want a hybrid. I want the real deal, electric (or something), but none of this halfway crap.

Quote:

My point, however, was that people get into the habit of buying new appliances, cars, etc. when the old ones wear out. All these savings are available if you are willing to pay the capital cost of the new energy saving models.

How long will it take to amortise the extra cost with the savings? Time will tell.


vbmenu_register("postmenu_783685", true);

Right.
 
typingrandomstuff
#27
Thank you all sirs and madams. That is very kind of you to support this. Hope you all live long and grand. Yay! Sandboxes!
Last edited by typingrandomstuff; Feb 26th, 2007 at 01:51 PM..
 
iARTthere4iam
#28
ITN's post is a great place to start. These are actual doable realistic ideas that will help the environment improve efficiency and save money. How do we implement these into Canadian society? Saving money is likely to be a big selling point (for those that have the initial capital to invest to make the improvements). Energy service contractors can help by fronting the money (we are going to need many many times more of these companies- this is a great business model for anyone looking to make bucketfuls of cash), the government can help by offering tax incentives and private individuals can help themselves by spending some money upfront to save later.

Cajoling and badgering people into making changes in their lives is not a very effective means of changing behaviour.

The constant and repetitive nature of the global warming hype is making people numb to the fact that we can do something. Encourage people to see how they can benefit from change.
 
typingrandomstuff
#29
I agree with you!

However, people of middle classes have intermediate money and every one with medium to low funds almost always like to buy something cheap. If we let the market to be cheaper for the environmental efficient products, a lot of people will buy them. As a lot of people buys them, then the environment will be a step closer to being saved. As this trend continues, people will not understand, but somehow they got to save the envrionment, their children, and their future generations.

The car industry of Ford have ethanol selling cars and many people decide to use ethanol to save the greenhouse gases by 30%. I've been thinking and I found that it is because America is one of the leading industries that many people may copy what it do. However, I do not really think all cars will use ethanol ones because Japanese cars with their efficiency and successful hybrid make a very grand value in the market too. The best now is for someone with a degree and a lot of skills to go into America's ford company and revise a new edition of the car plans with the ford's old features kept to save the planet. That way, a major chunk will be reduced. I am trying to get that degree and that skills.
 
L Gilbert
#30
Given a choice between ethanol powered vehicle and electric powered, I'll take the electric, thanks. I was a mechanic. I can tell you alcohol/gas mix isn't that great on the engine and it cuts down fuel efficiency.
But anyway, getting people to pay attention to what going green can do to their wallets is probably the best way to get their attention.
 

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