Tell me about Canadian Healthcare, from an American


View Poll Results: Which healthcare system is better?
United States 1 50.00%
Canada 1 50.00%
Voters: 2. You may not vote on this poll

KrautMan
#1
There has been much talk about national healthcare in the states in past decades. As soon as the talk starts we hear why its good and why it's bad. We hear that the healthcare in Canada is no where near as good as the US. I also hear that lots of Canadians come down here to get things done because of the wait (MRI's or something? I can't remember).

I have never been to Canada, so could someone with firsthand knowledge inform me about your healthcare and compare it to ours? I've always wondered what's true and whats not, and if national healthcare is inferior to private healthcare.

Thanks.
 
tracy
#2
I've worked and been a patient in both. Basically, the care is no different IMO (that's why patient outcomes are comparable in both countries). You may have to wait for non-urgent things in Canada, but I've had to wait for non-urgent things here in California too. The only real difference for patients is how it's paid for. As a patient, I'd rather get sick in Canada cause it's less hassle moneywise, but I'm not unsatisfied as a patient in the US because I have decent insurance and a reasonable income to pay for health costs. The actual number of Canadians seeking care in the US is miniscule. Mostly when we do, it's because we live here or because we were here on vacation when we got sick.

As a nurse, I prefer working in the US right now. There are things here I don't like, but they are far outweighed by the things I do. California is a great place to be a nurse IMO.

I can't vote for either as being better. I think both countries could learn from eachother.
 
Zzarchov
#3
The difference depends on what you want from health care. In the end the health care themselves are identical. The only difference is litterally, how your insurance is paid for, and thus what type of insurance you can buy.

In Canada, everyone is covered. If you are poor this is good, you can gain life saving coverage you would otherwise not be entitled too. This also means though, that rather than say..get fitted for a glass eye (or just buy a $2 eyepatch) they will get proper surgery, making someone else wait.

So in the USA the person with the better insurance would be first in line for the treatment, while in the USA they might have to wait since other people who in the USA would just be told "sucks to be you" are now waiting in line ahead of you to be cured as well.

So better depends on how you think society should be run. Do you think getting a higher paying job means you should be able to actually use your money for something useful (like getting treatment ahead of others) or do you think that any citizen by nature of being born in the same country should all be able to wait in the same line for the same treatment.

I prefer the safety of having free health care, But I can see the frustration of a well to do being upset that he has to risk dying of a heart attack while a crack smoking hobo gets treated first.
 
Curiosity
#4
Zzarchov

While you probably have a good reason as a basis for your opinion, I wonder how you profess to have knowledge when you write something
so incorrect and misinformed as the following:

Quote:

So in the USA the person with the better insurance would be first in line for the treatment, while in the USA they might have to wait since other people who in the USA would just be told "sucks to be you" are now waiting in line ahead of you to be cured as well.

That is simply wrong - and while you went on to demonstrate your need to find fault with the U.S. for whatever reason you have - please do not pass along what amounts to unproven allegations.

The U.S. even treat people who not only have "no insurance" but are residing in the country illegally - who become sick - who get the same medical care as a person with a top-notch insurance policy.

The priority is the degree of illness or injury presented, not the bank account or insurance policy.

I have been a recipient of both medical systems in Canada and the U.S. and for my particular needs, both were excellent in emergency care and elective routine care.

The U.S. also treats many specialized cases from other parts of the world such as separating conjoined twins or other birth defects and transplant cases which would be impossible in a person's homeland. Also the great movement of Doctors Without Borders has a large U.S. medical membership.
 

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