Hamilton's Gun Amnesty


Curiosity
#1
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/Con...path=News/News

Quote:

Toronto Star ^ | 3/9/06

Hamilton amnesty nets 300 guns

Mar. 9, 2006. 08:35 PM

HAMILTON (CP) Hamilton's month-long gun amnesty has already seen more than 300 firearms handed to police some with more jaw-dropping firepower than others.

Earlier this week, a resident turned over 67 rifles and shotguns and one handgun.

The next day, he called police again and told them he had one more weapon to get rid of.

When officers returned to his home, he handed them one of the most feared machine-guns of the Second World War a German MP-42.

Built to fire 1,300 rounds a minute, the machine-gun was easily manufactured, reliable and worked under the most adverse conditions.

All firearms handed in under the amnesty, which continues until the end of the month, will be destroyed, said Chief Brian Mullan.

Even weapons of historical significance will be destroyed, Mullan said.

"Owners will know if the gun is historically significant and they can turn them over to a museum," Mullan said. "But if they turn them over to us, we will destroy them."

Police already have two laundry carts full of rifles and shotguns, including a century-old American Winchester rifle.

They have also collected boxes of handguns, from flint-lock duelling pistols to small one-shot Derringers.

 
#juan
#2
W.C.

Quote:

They have also collected boxes of handguns, from flint-lock duelling pistols to small one-shot Derringers.

What a shame. At one time I had a collection of old guns. I only had six or seven but they were all in good shape except one that had a cracked breech. To make a long story short, the whole lot were stolen along with any cartridges I had. This was years ago in northern B.C.. I never got around to disabling the firing mechanism on the old Winchester with the cracked breech. I always half way hoped the thief blew his head off. Not really but you know what I mean....
 
FiveParadox
#3
I commend the merits of such an amnesty.

The less firearms on the street, the better.
 
Curiosity
#4
Juan

Doesn't it make you feel angry when someone steals something you treasure or keep as personal value? Violated or there isn't a word for it really. I probably would have wished he'd shot himself in the foot or head or whichever was convenient too!

Would you know I am deathly afraid of guns? I am generally not a woosie about most things but if I know there are guns in someone's house I prefer not to spend much time there if I get up enough courage to go in the first place. My father-in-law had one of those nice wooden gun rack cabinets full of lovely firearms...
and I had to get away from that room and even run past the doorway when passing it in the hall....fortunately I didn't have to spend much time in the room - it was sort of a study or "male" domain!

My dad's family all hunted and my brother had me firing small guns when I was too young to know better...but something must have happened to make me fear them.

I think the antiques which were actually used in provisions for food and protection and even warfare are beautiful - when seen in a museum....

I'm glad Hamilton have had some success with their amnesty idea....

It would probably not work where I am...lol....
 
Colpy
#5
The problem with amnesties (which are a good idea, BTW) is that anyone intending nefarious acts does NOT turn in their guns.

There are, however, often widows or others who wind up holding illegal weapons through no fault of their own, and they risk prosecution if they approach an over-zealous official with them.

I think there should be a nation-wide permanent amnesty for anyone that would turn in any weapon voluntarily.

I remember back in the seventies in little old Saint John an amnesty netted a 20mm Oerlikon (sp/) AA canon.

It is amazing the weapons that are out there.
 
Curiosity
#6
Colpy

My dad's ancestors settled in early Alberta and they lived off their weapons. My dad could not fathom living without a gun in his home - even when we were living in civilized Vancouver with not a bad man in sight (or a steer).

I think to some the weapon represents a part of their family history.
 
#juan
#7
W.C.

Where, and when I grew up, there was a kind of "right of passage". Young boys usually got a rifle on their fourteenth bithday. or the Christmas before. At fourteen I used to spend the whole day in the woods with my rifle and my dog. I never shot anything I didn't plan on taking home to eat. It was a different time. I would have trouble trusting today's fourteen year olds with a rifle. Maybe television has spoiled all that, or maybe I'm just paranoid.

I no longer have any guns. When our children were born I got rid of them. There was a terrible incident where six year old shot his baby sister. Getting rid of the guns was the easiest solution.
 
Curiosity
#8
Juan

Have you ever watched that old television show "House on the Prairie"...or something like that???

When I broke my arm last August I had some down time and found it running every day on one of the cable channels. Life seemed hard in those days, but I would love to have lived then.

Even if there were guns.

I am sorry there was an accident - not with your own family???? I hope not.

My brother shot a rat once in a field and brought it home for everyone to admire..... it was about six pounds....absolutely huge.... I ran away of course.... brothers are awful creatures!

Seems we are going backwards in the important things.... and with that depressing statement, I've earned a trip to Starbucks with my buds .... or maybe an ice cream shop if it's warm enough!
 
Colpy
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Wednesday's Child

Colpy

My dad's ancestors settled in early Alberta and they lived off their weapons. My dad could not fathom living without a gun in his home - even when we were living in civilized Vancouver with not a bad man in sight (or a steer).

I think to some the weapon represents a part of their family history.

Absolutely!

I grew up in this little city......with a house full of guns. My Dad was the ultimate deer hunter and country boy.

I inherited his love of guns. Ever see A Christmas Story about the kid and the Red Rider BB gun? That's me, I just never grew up.

I meant to say earlier that amnesties should allow a person to get licensed and register weapons instead of simply turning them in. That would encourage the practise. I once saw a DWM 1913 marked Artillery Luger with 8" barrel and snail drum magazine in perfect shape......worth 5 figures, not registered, captured in WW I by the guy's grandfather..............would be destroyed under today's law.
 
#juan
#10
Colpy, you'll shoot your eye out...
 

Similar Threads

9
Amnesty for Illegal Aliens
by thomaska | May 3rd, 2007
2
Amnesty International's amnesia
by jimmoyer | Oct 30th, 2005