That India-Pakistan thing


Twin_Moose
Conservative
#1
India claims airstrikes on Pakistan 'terror camps' across disputed Kashmir border

Quote:

An Indian minister has said that air force jets have struck “terror camps” across the ceasefire line in Kashmir, the first aerial bombing over the disputed border since the country went to war with Pakistan in 1971.
“The military has taken this necessary step for the country’s security. It was an act of extreme valour. PM [Narendra] Modi had earlier given the armed forces the freedom to take action. Today, the entire country is with the forces,” said Prakash Javadekar, the human resources development minister, in the first official acknowledgement of the operation.
The early morning incursion, which the Pakistanis say caused no casualties or damage, comes amid the highest tensions after a suicide attack on a paramilitary convoy that killed at least 40 security personnel earlier this month.
“Air Force carried out aerial strike early morning today at terror camps across the LoC (Line of Control) and Completely destroyed it,” the Indian minister of state for agriculture Gajendra Singh Shekhawat said on Twitter.
The Indian army and senior ministers have yet to officially comment but sources told an Indian news agency that 12 fighter jets had crossed into Pakistani territory and destroyed a militant training camp.
Pakistan’s armed forces spokesman major-general Asif Ghafoor said on Tuesday morning there had been contact between the two countries’ aircraft after a breach by the Indian side.
“Indian Air Force violated Line of Control,” Ghafoor tweeted around 5am local time. “Pakistan Air Force immediately scrambled. Indian aircrafts gone back.”
He added in a tweet two hours later: “Indian aircrafts intruded from Muzafarabad sector. Facing timely and effective response from Pakistan Air Force released payload in haste while escaping which fell near Balakot. No casualties or damage.”
He said the aircraft did not intrude beyond 3 to 4 miles over the ceasefire border known as the “line of control” based on lines established after the first war the two countries fought over Kashmir shortly after independence in 1947.
“Under forced hasty withdrawal aircrafts released payload which had free fall in open area,” he said “No infrastructure got hit, no casualties.”
His comments indicate the strike hit a small village called Balakot near the ceasefire border.
Balakot is also the name of a larger city about 50 miles from the border. Significantly, it is the Pakistani province of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, outside the territory that India claims as its own.
Indian news agency Asian News International quoted Indian air force sources claiming 12 Mirage fighter jets had struck “a major terrorist camp” over the border with 1,000 kg of explosives. The attack took place around 3.30am, the agency claimed.
While exchanges of artillery and light weapons over line are very common, intentional incursions by aircraft have not been publicly acknowledged since the two countries fought a war in 1971.
Military planes could be heard over Srinagar, the capital of Kashmir, in the early hours of Tuesday morning. There has been a large troop buildup in the region in recent days and doctors have been advised to cancel leave and stockpile medicines.
More than 300 separatist activists have been detained in past days, fuelling rumours that the Indian government was preparing to respond to the Pakistanis.

 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#2
A brief history

India and Pakistan need to stop beating the drums of war and seek a way out of confrontation

Quote:

The war of words between nuclear-armed India and Pakistan is a reminder that the ceasefire line dividing the Himalayan state of Kashmir remains, in the words of former US president Bill Clinton, “the most dangerous place in the world”. This month’s confrontation was sparked when a suicide bomber blew up a convoy of more than 40 Indian soldiers in India’s Kashmir, the deadliest terror strike in decades. Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM), a terrorist group based in Pakistan, claimed responsibility for the attack. The Himalayan region of Kashmir is claimed by both India and Pakistan and the two fought three wars over it since it was split between them in 1947. Over the weekend both Delhi and Islamabad beat the drums of war across the roof of the world.
The greatest risk is a miscalculation by India or Pakistan. Delhi ought to resist the urge to respond militarily, not least because of the chance of escalation. Pakistan, for its part, ought to move decisively against terrorist groups which despite being banned operate with impunity on its soil. Both need to seek a way out of confrontation. There is a nonchalance, often about how a war between these historic rivals could be contained. Yet in 1999, when Indian forces were on the verge of routing Pakistani troops which had crossed the border and captured mountain peaks in the Kargil region, Islamabad began preparing its nuclear weapons for deployment. The world stood on the precipice of an all-out regional war which would have led not only to tens of millions of deaths but whose fallout would have crippled global agricultural supplies. Mr Clinton forced the Pakistani establishment to step away from the nuclear abyss.
The leadership in both India and Pakistan have to avoid escalating a foreign crisis that they cannot back down from. With general elections later this year, domestic politics will shape how India’s Narendra Modi will respond to the bombing. Mr Modi has ramped up the rhetoric in campaign rallies vowing to “take revenge for each and every drop of blood shed”. The 20-year-old suicide bomber was a Kashmiri, leading to awful reprisals against Kashmiri students in other parts of India. It is shameful that it took India’s supreme court to chastise the government before Mr Modi said Kashmiris should be kept safe. India’s prime minister must seek peace in restive Kashmir. His militaristic approach has pushed the state to the brink of disaster. Locking up political activists will not help, nor will remoulding Kashmir’s constitutional status to the disadvantage of locals.
Pakistan’s new prime minister, Imran Khan, is also playing to the domestic gallery by warning of his country’s retaliation. Islamabad says it has closed down JeM’s headquarters in its Punjab province, although Pakistan’s record of briefly cracking down on terror groups only to relax controls when the pressure eases is a not a good sign. The real power in Pakistan is the nation’s military and its officials tweeted that they are “fully prepared for a befitting response to any Indian aggression or misadventure”. It is dangerous to think nuclear-armed nations can engage in a tit-for-tat spiral. The Pakistani army has got used to the idea that its nuclear weapons can prevent Indian conventional military superiority from punishing its support of anti-India terror groups. But two years ago Indian forces did conduct cross-border raids after a JeM attack, though thankfully tensions abated. Every serious crisis now risks a potential nuclear exchange at the outset. Much more is needed to move the two nations away from a vicious circle that binds them.

 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#3
India-Pakistan Relations: A 50-Year History

Interesting read
 
Hoid
#4
Kashmir long thought to be the likely Sarajevo for World War Last
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#5
After India’s Strike on Pakistan, Both Sides Leave Room for De-escalation
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
+1
#6
It is all Britain's fault for the screw up. Like in the muddled east, they knew that separating Pakistan and India would cause unrest nad it is to England's advantage to destabilize both. "If we can't have our empire, we will make such a mess."
 
EagleSmack
+1
#7
Man... you are so ****ing stupid.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#8
Pakistani Military Says It Shot Down 2 Indian Fighters , Capturing Pilots

Quote:

NEW DELHI — Pakistan’s military said Wednesday that it shot down two Indian fighter jets that had entered Pakistani airspace, capturing two pilots, in an escalation of hostilities just a day after Indian fighter jets crossed the disputed Kashmir region to launch an airstrike within Pakistan.
India’s government confirmed later Wednesday that one of its MiG-21 fighter jets had been “lost” as it thwarted an attempt by Pakistan’s air force to strike an unspecified target inside India. In the engagement, a Pakistani aircraft was shot down by an Indian fighter jet, New Delhi claimed.
“We have unfortunately lost one MiG-21. The pilot is missing in action. Pakistan has claimed that he is in their custody. We are ascertaining the facts,” Raveesh Kumar said at a news conference in New Delhi, the chief spokesman for India’s Ministry of External Affairs.
Mr. Kumar declined to take any questions and did not respond to claims by Pakistan’s military that it had shot down a second Indian jet. The spokesman did not comment on Pakistan’s claims that it currently held two Indian pilots, instead of the single pilot Mr. Kumar said was missing.
Earlier on Wednesday, Pakistan’s military said it had conducted its first airstrike against unspecified Indian targets, though it said no Pakistani aircraft crossed the border. And the military rejected India’s claim that a Pakistani fighter jet had been shot down.
There are fears that tensions between the nuclear-armed neighbors could escalate after Prime Minister Imran Khan of Pakistan promised on Tuesday to retaliate for an incursion by Indian jets hours before. Those airstrikes were the first time since 1971 that the Indian Air Force had crossed the Line of Control, the de facto border between the Indian- and Pakistani-held areas of Kashmir, to strike inside Pakistan.
Pakistan’s chief military spokesman, Major General Asif Ghafoor, said in a news conference on Wednesday afternoon that Pakistan’s air force had struck six targets inside India, without crossing into the country’s airspace. It was unclear what was struck; Major General Ghafoor described the strikes as being in an open area to make sure there was “no human loss or collateral damage.”
The Indian Air Force responded by entering into Pakistan’s airspace, he added, and two warplanes were shot down.
“Our ground forces arrested two pilots; one of them was injured and has been shifted to C.M.H., and he will be taken care of. The other one is with us,” Major General Ghafoor said, using the initials for the Combined Military Hospital complex.
By Wednesday afternoon, the Indian government shut down the airspace over parts of the country’s north that host military facilities, including Jammu, Srinagar, Amritsar, Leh and Dehradun, according to Rakesh Asthana, the director General of the Bureau of Civil Aviation and Security.
Pakistan also shut down large parts of its airspace, including major airports, according to a notice issued by the country’s Civil Aviation Authority.
In the Indian-controlled parts of Kashmir, volunteers painted large red crosses on the roofs of hospitals in an effort to keep them from being accidentally struck by airstrikes or artillery.
Troop movements were reported within both countries, including a tank column that temporarily shut down a highway in the western Indian state of Rajasthan, hundreds of miles south of Kashmir near the border with southern Pakistan.
In a televised speech, Mr. Khan said, “We waited, and today we took action,” shooting down two Indian aircraft after being “forced to retaliate” for the Indian airstrikes on Tuesday. But he asserted he had no desire for war.
“I am talking to India: We need to use wisdom and sagacity. All big wars have been due to miscalculation. No one knew how the war would end,” he said. “My question to India is that given the weapons we have, can we afford miscalculation?”
He added: “We should solve our problems through dialogue.”
In Indian-controlled Kashmir, residents and officials of Budgam district said that another Indian aircraft — it was unclear whether it was a helicopter or plane — had crashed in an open field there at about 10:15 a.m. local time.
“We have recovered the dead body of the pilot,” said Syed Sehrish Asgar, the deputy commissioner of Budgam district.
Rashid Ahmad Mir, a resident of Budgam, said he heard a loud crash and looked out his window to find smoke billowing out from a nearby field. He rushed to the scene of the flames and found a charred body.
It was unclear whether that crash was related in any way to the air battle reported by Pakistan.
In the early hours of Tuesday morning, India’s Air Force entered Pakistan to strike what the government claimed was a training camp belonging to the Jaish-e-Mohammed militant group in Balakot, Khyber-Pakhtunkwha Province, resulting in “heavy casualties.” But the Pakistani government and residents of the area reached by telephone said the strikes instead struck an open ravine, resulting in minimal damage.
Those strikes were in response to the Feb. 14 suicide bombing by Jaish-e-Mohammed on an Indian paramilitary convoy in Kashmir, which New Delhi vowed to respond to. The suicide bombing killed 40 Indian soldiers, the worst incident in Kashmir in three decades.
Jaish-e-Mohammed is classified as a terrorist group by the United Nations and blacklisted. Although the group is formally banned by Pakistan’s government, American and Indian officials say it operates freely in the country, which Islamabad denies.
In decades of conflict, India and Pakistan have each downed dozens of aircraft. In 1965, during the first major war since Partition, it is estimated that Pakistan destroyed more than 50 Indian aircraft and lost about 20 planes. In 1971, when fighting erupted in East Pakistan, now known as Bangladesh, it is estimated that the Indian Air Force lost more 40 aircraft and the Pakistanis lost more than 70.
Most recently, when fighting erupted in the skies over Kashmir in 1999, at least one Pakistani naval aircraft was downed by an Indian fighter jet. All 16 people aboard were killed.
India’s governing party, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, is in the middle of a fiercely contested election season, with polls to be held this spring. In the aftermath of the suicide bombing on its paramilitary forces earlier this month, many Indian voters called for vengeance against Pakistan, and Mr. Modi vowed to execute it.
In an effort to defuse tensions, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called the foreign ministers of both India and Pakistan on Tuesday evening.
“I expressed to both ministers that we encourage India and Pakistan to exercise restraint, and avoid escalation at any cost. I also encouraged both ministers to prioritize direct communication and avoid further military activity,” according to a statement from Mr. Pompeo’s office.
Despite the tension, analysts found reason to remain hopeful that the situation would not escalate further.
“Given the fact that no one has declared war and that Pakistan did not carry out airstrikes across international border but from within Line of Control, that suggests there’s a certain amount of restraint being exercised by both sides. There’s an implicit desire to keep this contained so I don’t see a much larger escalation in the days ahead,” said Happymon Jacob, an associate professor at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi who monitors violence along the border.
“We will likely see third parties like the United States or Russia get involved to make sure this doesn’t escalate. At this point is more messaging for the domestic populations, to show that each side is in charge and won’t be cowed,” Mr. Jacob added.
In Pakistan, Mr. Khan said he was meeting with various government bodies on Wednesday to formulate a response to India, including the National Command Authority — the body that oversees the deployment and management of the country’s nuclear arms.
The American government has typically played an important role diffusing tensions between India and Pakistan, shuttling between the two rivals in past flare-ups. But President Trump has soured on Pakistan while drawing closer to India since coming to office in 2017.
Early last year, Mr. Trump cut some $1.3 billion in military assistance to Pakistan because of the country’s support of terrorist groups. Pakistan’s military denies those accusations.

A good read on the latest timeline of events

The Latest: Turkey concerned over Pakistan-India tensions
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

It is all Britain's fault for the screw up. Like in the muddled east, they knew that separating Pakistan and India would cause unrest nad it is to England's advantage to destabilize both. "If we can't have our empire, we will make such a mess."

That's what happens when you paint religious, and cultural tribes with the same broad brush.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#10
Major airlines suspend India, Pakistan flights amid rising tensions
 
Blackleaf
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

, they knew that separating Pakistan and India would cause unrest

Did they? How do you know this?

Quote:

nad it is to England's advantage to destabilize both.

How? How has it benefitted England?
 
Blackleaf
+1
#12
I blame Abdul, the bulk packer at our bathroom products warehouse (I'm a man-up truck driver/order picker). He went back to his Indian homeland on Thursday for three weeks then all the shit kicks off. Definitely his fault.
Last edited by Blackleaf; Feb 27th, 2019 at 07:43 PM..
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#13
China is at risk of being caught in the middle of an India-Pakistan conflict


Lol because of Trump and the trade war China was put into the middle
 
Hoid
#14
Trump helping to destabilize nuke regimes.
I can see where that would break you up
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#15
Read the article before spewing shit Hoid, destabilizing has nothing to do with the article
 
MHz
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

A brief history

India and Pakistan need to stop beating the drums of war and seek a way out of confrontation

The UK are the ones that made the border where it is just to make sure the two sides would be hostile towards each other for every.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#17
Didn't read the article did you?
 
Blackleaf
+1
#18
Have you seen that Indian pilot's moustache? It's a great work of art.
 
Hoid
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Didn't read the article did you?

DO you honestly think anyone reads any of the dozens of links you post day after day?

**** knows you don't read them yourself.
 
Blackleaf
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

DO you honestly think anyone reads any of the dozens of links you post day after day?
**** knows you don't read them yourself.

Behave or else I'll tell Andem over you.
 
Blackleaf
#21
No, I'm only joking. I'm not a grass.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

DO you honestly think anyone reads any of the dozens of links you post day after day?
**** knows you don't read them yourself.

I read everyone of them, I also read the ones you or anyone posts before commenting that's how you stay on topic
 
MHz
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

DO you honestly think anyone reads any of the dozens of links you post day after day?

**** knows you don't read them yourself.

That doesn't change that it was the UK that put the border where it is.


https://web.stanford.edu/class/e297c...ervention.html
During the 19th century the British Empire had parliamentary governments spanning the entire globe controlling their interests and their nationalist ideals. By the late 19th century the Indian people had become tired of the British rule and revolutionaries banded together to create the Indian National Congress. The Congress was originally created for the idea of making reforms within the British parliamentary government by placing greater prevalence on such issues as a better educational system and greater representation of the Indian population within the parliamentary government. During this period, many Indian revolutionaries terrorized government institutions as well as confronted the British military. These revolutionary groups attempted to force the Indian ideas of self-government upon the British parliament. By the early 20th century the British government was attempting to subdue the Indian uprisings by granting the Congress more political power. But the British had taken too long to share its political power and Indian extremists were demanding a complete independence from British rule. In 1916 several Indian nationalist groups united to support the British in World War I, but overall most of the nationalist groups had become frustrated with the unattained goal of self-rule that had been proclaimed years earlier, to be the eventual goal of the British rule within the region.

Many of the Indian nationalist groups were demanding immediate and complete self-government for India by the early 20th century, but the British were refusing to let go of their economic interests quickly. In 1919 the British parliament passed several laws restricting political activity of the Indian nationalist groups and committed acts in which they violated the civil rights of both the revolutionary groups and the general Indian public. These civil right violations incited many of the Indian people and helped press the demands of the Congress. With the leadership of Mahatma Gandhi in the 1920's the Indian Congress became a very threatening power. Also during the 1920's the Muslims were strongly resenting the political hold that the Hindus had gained because of the Congress and staged a Muslim withdrawal from the Congress in protest of the religious dominance.
As India pressed for its independence the Miislims began to separate themselves from the Hindu political organi7ations. In 1907 the Muslim community created its own nationalist organization the Muslim Icague. By 1910 there were two dominant and completely separate revolutionary factions within Jndia that not only fought against the British rule but each other. As the British rule was becoming more threatened by revolutionaries and the Hindu dominated Congress became more powerful. the Muslim League pressed for the senaration of Muslim people from the British ruled India The Muslim League and the Congress constantly clashed on important issues and weakened the political strength that the Indian people were buildin~ within the British parliament. But even with the conflicts between the two religions one thing was clear all of the Indian people were demandina self-rule for the whole of the Indian sub-continen4. The tension between the British rule and both the Congress and the League were escalating into confrontation within both the political and social arenas. At the end of the World War, Britain was drained economically and unable to maintain its rule over its vast empire. So in 1946 Britain gave tip control of the Indian sub-continent and the Con~ess and League voted to partition the country into two senarate nations based on religion separation. The nations of India and Pakistan were formed in 1947 where the nation of India was religiously senarated for the H indu population and Pakistan was for the Muslim people.
The shift from British rule to separate independently ruled nations of India and Pakistan was to occur within six months after the nlebiscite and resulted in a violent collision of uprooted Muslims and Hindus Millions of neonle were forced from their respective homes because of religious boundaries between the nations Refugees from either border were not the only problem that the new governments were forced to deal with, they also had to somehow divide up military, financial, and natural resources. There also needed to be draw boundaries between the two countries.
As refugees moved from one nation to their new homes, confrontations broke out, and in rapidly growing numbers. Before long, there was full-fledged fighting along the boarder of the nations. Both newly formed governments struggled to preserve law and order while continuously bickered with each other over the splitting of resources. Pakistan demanded a greater share of the resources while India protested that Pakistan was demanding an unfair split of resources. The primary source for the boundary debate, was a region of the sub-continent that separated the northern border of India and the southeastern border of Pakistan, called Jammu and Kashmir.
During the early British imperial expansion efforts, the British government sold the Kashmir territory to the Hindu Prince Ghulab Singh and this family controlled the region for nearly a hundred years. As the British began to remove its influence from the region the maharajah was offered the chance to join either the Indian nation or the Pakistani nation. There were many other regions controlled by local principals that were also given the option to join one of these two nations, and in general the Hindu states joined with India and the Islamic states joined with Pakistan. At this time Kashmir was being ruled by a Hindu maharajah but the general population was Muslim, and this gave pause to the decision to join either India or Pakistan. At the hesitation to join either side a popular uprising moved through the capital and forced the maharajah to flee for his life. The maharajah quickly made his way to India where he signed an agreement to turn the state over the India in return for personal protection. India quickly moved troops into Kashmir to quiet the revolutionaries, while Pakistan responded with troops of their own to help keep their religious brethren from falling under the control of the Hindu controlled Indian government. For the next three years the Indian and Pakistani troops fought over the territory where thousands of military and civilians were tortured and killed by both sides. In 1949 a cease-fire was called and Kashmir was divided up into two unequal parts, an eastern portion which is controlled by India and a much smaller territory to the west which is controlled by Pakistan.
 
MHz
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Didn't read the article did you?

You headline shows you are on the wrong path so no solution will come from it. If you want me to show you that it is wrong I will, as it is I pointed you to a different reason that you still have to research before you can dismiss it. Who did the splitting that it was done to create conflict rather than eliminate it?



The Himalayan region of Kashmir is claimed by both India and Pakistan and the two fought three wars over it since it was split between them in 1947.
 
DaSleeper
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

I read everyone of them, I also read the ones you or anyone posts before commenting that's how you stay on topic

Hoid never posts any link.....You're supposed to take his word as gospel for everything!
 
MHz
#26
Mig-21 splashes F-16 seems to be lost in the 'fog of war' or is that intentional to save the West's arms industry from folding like a house of cards?
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

You headline shows you are on the wrong path so no solution will come from it. If you want me to show you that it is wrong I will, as it is I pointed you to a different reason that you still have to research before you can dismiss it. Who did the splitting that it was done to create conflict rather than eliminate it?
The Himalayan region of Kashmir is claimed by both India and Pakistan and the two fought three wars over it since it was split between them in 1947.

Oh and your article was explaining your path? What has this part of your article have to do with it's the Brit's fault"

Quote:

The maharajah quickly made his way to India where he signed an agreement to turn the state over the India in return for personal protection. India quickly moved troops into Kashmir to quiet the revolutionaries, while Pakistan responded with troops of their own to help keep their religious brethren from falling under the control of the Hindu controlled Indian government. For the next three years the Indian and Pakistani troops fought over the territory where thousands of military and civilians were tortured and killed by both sides. In 1949 a cease-fire was called and Kashmir was divided up into two unequal parts, an eastern portion which is controlled by India and a much smaller territory to the west which is controlled by Pakistan.

The Brit's were releasing India to be free but the 2 religions couldn't agree on living together so the Brit's drew a line on the map both didn't entirely disagree but the Muslim's wanted most of the resources not an even split like the Hindu's were asking. Millions died not because of the Brit's but because the Mussies were too greedy. It says so right in your article never mind it saying it in the article's that I posted.


This part of your post

Quote:

The Himalayan region of Kashmir is claimed by both India and Pakistan and the two fought three wars over it since it was split between them in 1947.

Is also proven false in your own article in the post that I quoted


Quote:

The maharajah quickly made his way to India where he signed an agreement to turn the state over the India in return for personal protection. India quickly moved troops into Kashmir to quiet the revolutionaries, while Pakistan responded with troops of their own to help keep their religious brethren from falling under the control of the Hindu controlled Indian government.

Where earlier in your article the Brit's sold the Kashmir to maharajah who was Hindu and he was reluctant to join India due to the large Muslim population, he tried to stay neutral until the Muslims started rebelling, and he fled to save his life

Kinda tough when your own article turns on you aint it?
Last edited by Twin_Moose; Mar 2nd, 2019 at 10:26 AM..
 
MHz
#28
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PmnLASMFjg
Security Scan - MiG-21 Bison

The MiG-21 Bison fighter jet of the Indian Air Force that shot down and advanced American origin F-16 of the Pakistani Air Force on 27/02/2019 was a highly upgraded version of the Soviet era jet . India's first MiG-21 arrived from the Soviet Union in 1963 and four years later Hindustan Aeronautics Limited started making these jets at home under license from Soviets . The MiG-21 Bison upgrade was launched in 1990s and the last upgrade for 110 MiG-21 jets to Bison happened in 2006 turning them in to capable modern fighter jets fitted with beyond visual range missiles
 
MHz
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Oh and your article was explaining your path? What has this part of your article have to do with it's the Brit's fault"



The Brit's were releasing India to be free but the 2 religions couldn't agree on living together so the Brit's drew a line on the map both didn't entirely disagree but the Muslim's wanted most of the resources not an even split like the Hindu's were asking. Millions died not because of the Brit's but because the Mussies were too greedy. It says so right in your article never mind it saying it in the article's that I posted.

I don't have a path, what I have is a document that shows the root cause of hostilities goes back to the days when the UK was the power in the land. Why the hell would you be able to admit to anything but the shallow answer you already supplied? (glib and superficial charm)


Basically nothing other than confirm that they put the border where it would create the most conflict.

The UK is a war machine, since 1815 they have done nothing but create hardship everyplace they went. The price you pay for becoming a Lackey fit the World Bank.. You want to be educated in that area as well?? The US replaced them at the end of WWII. When the US is stabbed in the back the UK will go with the EU and again be in good graces with their Masters.


Speak English retard, 'neither side agreed with' where the line was drawn so that is why it will never be moved.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

I don't have a path, what I have is a document that shows the root cause of hostilities goes back to the days when the UK was the power in the land. Why the hell would you be able to admit to anything but the shallow answer you already supplied? (glib and superficial charm)
Basically nothing other than confirm that they put the border where it would create the most conflict.
The UK is a war machine, since 1815 they have done nothing but create hardship everyplace they went. The price you pay for becoming a Lackey fit the World Bank.. You want to be educated in that area as well?? The US replaced them at the end of WWII. When the US is stabbed in the back the UK will go with the EU and again be in good graces with their Masters.
Speak English retard, 'neither side agreed with' where the line was drawn so that is why it will never be moved.

So here we are again you can't refute so attack alrighty then, again from your article keep in mind the league is the forefather of the commonwealth

Quote:

So in 1946 Britain gave tip control of the Indian sub-continent and the Con~ess and League voted to partition the country into two senarate nations based on religion separation. The nations of India and Pakistan were formed in 1947 where the nation of India was religiously senarated for the H indu population and Pakistan was for the Muslim people.


So now is it time for your


 

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