First Nations pipeline has a plan to get around B.C. oil tanker ban


petros
+3
#1
Keepers of the Earth

A First Nations’ led $17-billion project to build an oil pipeline from Alberta to the West Coast has put in motion a back-up plan to site its terminal across the border in Alaska to get around an imminent oil tanker ban in British Columbia’s northern coast.

Vancouver-based Eagle Spirit Energy Holdings Ltd. has signed a memorandum of understanding with Roanan Corp., a private landowner in Hyder, an old gold-rush town on the Alaska side of the Canada/U.S. border at the head of the Portland Canal, to locate the pipeline’s endpoint.

That’s where tankers could load Canadian oil and sail through the disputed waters of Dixon Entrance, claimed by both Canada and the United States, if Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s tanker ban becomes law, project chairman and president Calvin Helin said in an interview.

“It’s a complete answer to the tanker ban,” said Helin, a member of the Lax Kw’alaams band near Prince Rupert who believes Alaska would welcome the proposal because of its significant economic benefits.

Construction of the terminal alone would involve an investment of up to $1 billion. An additional $500 million would be spent on spill prevention preparedness, including tugboats, barges and training, Helin said.

It’s the project’s latest salvo against the controversial ban. Indigenous leaders behind Eagle Spirit say the ban is the result of a lobbying campaign by American-financed environmental NGOs and is being pushed through without their consultation and consent. If adopted, it would eliminate immediate and future opportunities for development, they say.


The Eagle Spirit project would transport as much as one million barrels a day of Alberta oil to Asia. More than 30 First Nations from Bruderheim, Alta., through Northern B.C., to Grassy Point, B.C. support the project and would be equity owners. In addition to an oil pipeline, Eagle Spirit involves a pre-approved energy corridor that could accommodate natural gas, power transmission and fibre optic lines.

Under its current plan, the pipeline’s endpoint and tanker terminal would be located in Grassy Point. If the ban, which is now before Parliament, is implemented, it would effectively prevent the establishment of an oil tanker port in Canadian territory on the Northern B.C. coast, Helin said. The project would then end in the corridor in Hyder, located about 25 kilometres up the coast in Alaska.

Transport Canada has said that it held 75 engagement sessions to discuss the proposed moratorium and that Transport Minister Marc Garneau engaged directly with all Indigenous groups that would be affected or expressed an interest in the moratorium.

Eagle Spirit proponents have also launched a fundraising campaign to pay for a legal challenge against the ban, and started an e-petition calling on Canada’s Parliament to “withdraw the proposed ban on crude oil tanker traffic off B.C.’s north coast and begin a new process whereby the interests of all affected, especially Indigenous and other communities in the region, are considered concurrently with a robust industry and national economic assessment, which recognizes the importance of ensuring Canada’s world-leading environmentally and socially responsible oil and gas industry can reach the growing demand of global markets.”

Roanan is a private company based in Vancouver that has owned property in Hyder for 40 years. With fewer than 100 residents, the border town is adjacent to Stewart, B.C., with a population of about 300.

Roanan’s president and CEO, Walter Moa, and Helin signed an agreement Jan. 11 to work together on the plan.

Moa said Hyder is an ideal site for a tanker terminal because it has a deepwater port.

There have been long-term efforts to develop it and the Eagle Spirit proposal would provide an ideal opportunity.

Roanan holds port, townsite and mineral claims in the area, he said.

“Alaska is in general very supportive of resource development,” Moa said in an emailed statement. “As with any new development, local, state and federal support is important.”

Helin said the plan is in the early stages and discussions with Alaska and others impacted by the plan have just started.

A spokesperson for Alaska governor Bill Walker was not immediately available for comment.

Tankers would sail through Dixon Entrance, located south of the Alaska Panhandle and the North Shore of Haida Gwaii. Territorial boundaries have been disputed since 1903.

Under the proposed Oil Tanker Moratorium Act, oil tankers are banned “at ports or marine installations located along British Columbia’s north coast from the northern tip of Vancouver Island to the Alaska border.”

The tanker ban is a major obstacle to the project. It was announced by Trudeau in November 2016, at the same time as the Liberal government halted Enbridge Inc.’s Northern Gateway pipeline.

Eagle Spirit is backed by the Aquilini Group of Vancouver and has the support of major Canadian oil producers including Suncor Energy Inc., Cenovus Energy Inc. and Meg Energy Corp. It emerged about five years ago as an alternative to Northern Gateway, which was opposed by First Nations that felt environmental protection and benefits were insufficient. It’s modelled after the Alyeska pipeline between Alaska’s Prudhoe Bay and Valdez, built and operated with involvement from the state’s Indigenous people.

Financial Post

 
Twin_Moose
+3
#2
Who says Enbridge Inc.’s Northern Gateway pipeline. is dead
 
petros
#3
Do they have cultural license of the Botswanans?
 
Twin_Moose
+2
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Do they have cultural license of the Botswanans?

Maybe, but they have a lot of cash invested in this and they said they have alternatives
 
petros
+4
#5
There goes the First Nations angle for the econauts.

Go for it. They need good revenues.
 
Twin_Moose
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

There goes the First Nations angle for the econauts.

Go for it. They need good revenues.

I could be wrong but Enbridge services Bruderheim, Alta for Suncor
 
Murphy
+3
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

There goes the First Nations angle for the econauts.

Go for it. They need good revenues.

Over the years, I have never thought of natives as eco-warriors. Many whined that the government owed them. This is good news because it demonstrates that a group of natives have decided to do something positive for themselves.

It has positive repercussions not only for them, but for the Pacific market area. I would not be concerned with Ottawa. Washington might try and stir up trouble though.

We'll have to wait and see.
 
petros
+4
#8
I'm quite happy to see an investment of such scale, longevity and opportunity for FNs to create skilled work and educate a lot of people without having to leave family and homes behind.
 
taxslave
+2
#9
THink the ecoterrorists will be brave enough to protest an indian run pipeline? Unfortunate that many good jobs will go to US citizens.
 
petros
+2
#10
FNs don't have borders.
 
Mowich
+5
#11  Top Rated Post
Braid: Leaders erupt as Senate cuts Alberta out of tanker ban hearings

A Senate committee has ruled there will be no hearings in Alberta on Bill C-48, the atrocious tanker moratorium, which should really be called the Alberta Product Ban.

The committee will travel to Terrace and Prince Rupert B.C. But the senators have twice voted down pleas to hold hearings in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

On Friday NDP Leader Rachel Notley sent a letter asking the Senate to reconsider. She urged Albertans to do the same.

“They don’t think the people of Alberta should be heard . . . I gotta tell you, this is kind of an unprecedented stampede of stupid,” Notley said.

“I’m stunned. Albertans deserve better from Canada.”

UCP leader Jason Kenney said “It’s ridiculous that the Liberal-appointed majority in the Senate won’t even consider hearings in Alberta, where the Trudeau government’s series of anti-oil and gas policies are having a damaging impact on jobs and communities across our province.”

Bill C-48 has passed the Commons and is now in the hands of this Senate transport committee, the last line of defence against final approval.

Tankers, obviously, are all about ocean transport of products transported from inland places.

But the Senate’s transport committee is not interested in hearing from provinces that need transport.

If that bunch won’t listen, who ever will?

Veteran Alberta senator Elaine McCoy told the committee there would “effectively be a ban on any kind of shipping of oil from Canada from that region.

“That means that we as a country will have told three provinces that they cannot exploit or sell their natural resources. Those provinces are British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan.” McCoy isn’t a committee member, so she could speak but not vote. The same is true for fierce C-48 opponent Senator Doug Black, who says:

“It angers me, as a Senator from Alberta, that is being hurt, which I would suggest is being targeted, that my colleagues wouldn’t say ‘I can find two days to go and listen to Albertans’.”

The committee has rigged these hearings to ensure that most of thetestimony comes from coastal supporters of Bill C-48. It’s hard to miss the echo of Bill C-69, the equally horrible legislation that focuses on environment and social concerns for project approval, to the exclusion of economic benefit.

Bill C-48 was conceived on a whim by Justin Trudeau before he was prime minister. It’s part of the Liberal plan to ensure that nothing like Northern Gateway can ever be proposed again. The Liberals are even deaf to First Nations who want to build a northern pipeline.

Clearly, the craven majority on the Senate committee is unwilling to cross Trudeau’s dewey romantic vision of that lovely coast, whatever the cost to prairie economies.

This news drops into Alberta at the start of an election campaign in which every party agrees many Albertans are already furious at Ottawa.

On Friday, a new Environics Institute survey showed that a majority of people in Alberta and Saskatchewan think we get so little out of Canada that we might as well leave.

Discontent is almost as strong in Atlantic Canada. And that part of the country, by clueless coincidence, was also excluded from the hearings on Bill C-48.

Some Atlantic senators wanted hearings there because the region has knowledge to share about safe tanker transport of oil products. That might actually have helped senators understand that tankers can co-exist with a clean, healthy environment.

No such federal ban is proposed for the Atlantic, of course, even though much of the landscape there is every bit as pristine and precious as B.C.’s north coast. Senator Black has done research and could find no comparable ban to C-48 anywhere in the world.

But nothing quite like Alberta’s oilsands industry exists anywhere in the world, either – so how else can a bunch of tame, unelected senators give it a hard time?

calgaryherald.com/news/politics/braid-leaders-erupt-as-senate-cuts-alberta-out-of-tanker-ban-hearings
 
Hoid
-1
#12
Yes a major port in disputed territory

Should be a piece of cake.
 
petros
+3 / -1
#13
Fed port land in Burnaby is disputed territory?

The instant you get a Status Card you've ceded.
 
taxslave
+4
#14
One would have to conclude that the liberal party of what used to be Canada has been bought and paid for by US oil interests.
 
Hoid
#15
 
Jinentonix
+4
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Oh my, look who's all pissy about the FN getting a piece of the oil action and learning that he doesn't speak for any of the FN.

So tell us Mary, what makes the West Coast so f*cking special that we can't ship oil from it but we can import oil to the East Coast?
It sure can't be the excuse that the 1/7 of Canada's population who are responsible for 40% of the country's total raw sewage dumping are so concerned about the marine environment. Particularly when you think about the tonnage of coal, potash and other fun shit that's shipped out of the West Coast.
 
taxslave
+1
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

I hope he comes back.
 
Hoid
#18
white nattys mad
 
pgs
+1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Oh my, look who's all pissy about the FN getting a piece of the oil action and learning that he doesn't speak for any of the FN.

So tell us Mary, what makes the West Coast so f*cking special that we can't ship oil from it but we can import oil to the East Coast?
It sure can't be the excuse that the 1/7 of Canada's population who are responsible for 40% of the country's total raw sewage dumping are so concerned about the marine environment. Particularly when you think about the tonnage of coal, potash and other fun shit that's shipped out of the West Coast.

Natural gas , oil sulpher .
 
petros
+1
#20
Petrochemicals
 
Jinentonix
+4
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

white nattys mad

Oh look, a thread about the FN and pipelines. You better blame Harper for something to distract from the fact that you do NOT speak for the FN (despite your previous attempts to assume you do) or that despite your racist asshat views, the FN do NOT think and act as a single bloc.

Hoof Hearted was right about you in another area.

Forum thread: "First Nations pipeline has a plan to get around B.C. oil tanker ban"

Hoid: "It's all Harper's fault."
Last edited by Jinentonix; Mar 26th, 2019 at 12:32 PM..
 
petros
+1
#22
Yup. Hoid is a racist.
 
DaSleeper
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Yup. Hoid is a racist.

What do you expect from a "White Uncle Tom"
 
petros
+2
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

One would have to conclude that the liberal party of what used to be Canada has been bought and paid for by US oil interests.

That was the point of creating PetroCanada. The oil industry is where old Liberals go to die.

A perfect example.

Hon. A. Anne McLellan P.C., O.C., A.O.E.

Senior Advisor at Bennet Jones.
Big Lawyers for Big Oil

The rest of her current and past positions included working with Alberta Conservatives:

Ms. McLellan is on the boards of:

Agrium, a global producer and marketer of agricultural nutrients and industrial products where she chairs the Environment, Health, Safety and Security Committee;

Cameco Corp., the world's largest publicly-traded uranium mining company;

Canadian Institute for Advanced Research;

Dalhousie University where she chairs the Dalhousie Advisory Council and was appointed Chancellor in May 2015;

Edmonton Oilers Community Foundation;

Institute for Research for Public Policy, where she is vice-chair;

Pearson College - United World College, where she is chair; and TELUS Edmonton Community Board, where she is chair.

She is a former board member of Nexen, a Canadian-based global energy company; the Edmonton Airports Regional Authority and the Telus Community Foundation.

In March 2011, Ms. McLellan was appointed by the Health Quality Council of Alberta (HQCA) to the Advisory Panel that was created to provide advice to the HQCA in its review of the quality of care and safety of patients requiring access to emergency department care and cancer surgery and the role and process of physician advocacy. She was a member of the Premier's Council for Economic Strategy, a group of 12 advisors providing "guidance on actions the Alberta government can take to best position the province for the future" and which issued its report, Shaping Alberta's Future, in May 2011.


LIBERAL Big Oil Big Uranium Big Agro
 
MHz
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

One would have to conclude that the liberal party of what used to be Canada has been bought and paid for by US oil interests.

You spelled 'Dutch oil interests' wrong.
 
MHz
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

That was the point of creating PetroCanada.

Really?? So building an infrastructure and surveying Canada at taxpayer expense accidentally helped the buyers of said company when the R&D was completed.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

That was the point of creating PetroCanada. The oil industry is where old Liberals go to die.
A perfect example.
Hon. A. Anne McLellan P.C., O.C., A.O.E.
Senior Advisor at Bennet Jones.
Big Lawyers for Big Oil
The rest of her current and past positions included working with Alberta Conservatives:
Ms. McLellan is on the boards of:
Agrium, a global producer and marketer of agricultural nutrients and industrial products where she chairs the Environment, Health, Safety and Security Committee;
Cameco Corp., the world's largest publicly-traded uranium mining company;
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research;
Dalhousie University where she chairs the Dalhousie Advisory Council and was appointed Chancellor in May 2015;
Edmonton Oilers Community Foundation;
Institute for Research for Public Policy, where she is vice-chair;
Pearson College - United World College, where she is chair; and TELUS Edmonton Community Board, where she is chair.
She is a former board member of Nexen, a Canadian-based global energy company; the Edmonton Airports Regional Authority and the Telus Community Foundation.
In March 2011, Ms. McLellan was appointed by the Health Quality Council of Alberta (HQCA) to the Advisory Panel that was created to provide advice to the HQCA in its review of the quality of care and safety of patients requiring access to emergency department care and cancer surgery and the role and process of physician advocacy. She was a member of the Premier's Council for Economic Strategy, a group of 12 advisors providing "guidance on actions the Alberta government can take to best position the province for the future" and which issued its report, Shaping Alberta's Future, in May 2011.
LIBERAL Big Oil Big Uranium Big Agro

They miss the CWB big time, they use to park a lot of loyalists there, now the NEB is being converted to a parking lot
 
Hoid
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Oh look, a thread about the FN and pipelines. You better blame Harper for something to distract from the fact that you do NOT speak for the FN (despite your previous attempts to assume you do) or that despite your racist asshat views, the FN do NOT think and act as a single bloc.
Hoof Hearted was right about you in another area.
Forum thread: "First Nations pipeline has a plan to get around B.C. oil tanker ban"
Hoid: "It's all Harper's fault."


As regards a pipeline what I said was:

"Yes a major port in disputed territory

Should be a piece of cake."

As regards pigs oink

"One would have to conclude that the liberal party of what used to be Canada has been bought and paid for by US oil interests."

that is when I mentioned Steven Harper, the Big Oil trained monkey


How can you possibly learn anything if you don't listen to what I say?
 
petros
+2
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Really?? So building an infrastructure and surveying Canada at taxpayer expense accidentally helped the buyers of said company when the R&D was completed.

Palliser and Kelsey surveyed on taxpayer and not HBC and North West Company's dime?

Alternative History for sure.
 
petros
+1
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

As regards a pipeline what I said was:
"Yes a major port in disputed territory
Should be a piece of cake."
As regards pigs oink
"One would have to conclude that the liberal party of what used to be Canada has been bought and paid for by US oil interests."
that is when I mentioned Steven Harper, the Big Oil trained monkey
How can you possibly learn anything if you don't listen to what I say?

Did you know Little Oil is sneakier than Big Oil?