2018 deaths of noteables


Walter
+1
#31
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Vicar of Dibley actress Emma Chambers dies aged 53

24 February 2018
BBC News



Actors Dawn French and Hugh Grant have led tributes to their former co-star Emma Chambers, who has died aged 53.

Known for playing Alice Tinker in The Vicar of Dibley, Doncaster-born Chambers also had roles in Notting Hill and a Martin Chuzzlewit adaptation.

Chambers died from natural causes on Wednesday evening and would be "greatly missed", her agent John Grant said.

"Emma created a wealth of characters and an immense body of work," he added.

She leaves a husband, fellow actor Ian Dunn.

French, who starred in The Vicar of Dibley alongside Chambers for 13 years, paid tribute to a "very bright spark and the most loyal and loving friend anyone could wish for".

"I will miss her very much", she said, while also posting a picture of the pair on Twitter.

Notting Hill star Hugh Grant, who played the older brother of Chambers' character Honey in the 1999 film, spoke of his sadness following the news, adding: "She brought laughter and joy to many."

Other well-wishers included Emma Freud, the partner of Richard Curtis, who created both the film and the TV comedy.

Chambers played the character of Alice Tinker, a village church verger, in The Vicar of Dibley between 1994 and 2007, with French in the title role.

Vicar of Dibley actress Emma Chambers dies aged 53 - BBC News

Brilliant actress, always makes me laugh when watching VoD.
 
Blackleaf
#32
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJpoOlCbBrw
 
spaminator
#33
Tower Records founder Russell Solomon dead at 92
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
March 5, 2018
Updated:
March 5, 2018 8:14 PM EST
In this 1997 file photo, Russell Solomon, founder of Tower Records, is photographed inside a sculpture at the Tower Records headquarters in Sacramento, Calif. (Michael A. Jones/The Sacramento Bee via AP, File)
SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Russell Solomon, founder of the Tower Records chain that became a global phenomenon and changed the way people consumed music, has died. He was 92.
Solomon died Sunday night of an apparent heart attack while drinking whisky and watching the Oscars, said his son, Michael Solomon.
Russell Solomon first began selling music in 1941, at age 16, out of his father’s Sacramento drug store inside the historic Tower Theater building.
The makeshift record shop officially became Tower Records in 1960. Solomon, who preferred jazz, country and classical music, offered something other stores didn’t: A place to sift through every genre of music in one place, with the help of employees who loved music even more.
Solomon expanded to San Francisco in 1968, then to Los Angeles and eventually all across the world, with Tower Records operating 271 stores and selling US$1 billion worth of records at its height in the 1990s.
In this undated file photo, Tower Records founder Russell Solomon poses for a picture at the company’s corporate headquarters in West Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
Michael Solomon said his father’s theories about what a music store should be were simple: Large inventories, long and late hours, and control by local managers about artists and records each individual store should stock. The company’s more than 8,000 employees were music lovers who wore their clothes and hair however they wanted and showed up to work because they loved music as much as Solomon did.
“I’m sure he’ll go down in history as having the greatest record store chain in the world,” Michael Solomon said.
Solomon and Tower Records were the subject of a 2015 documentary by actor Colin Hanks that examined its iconic role in music in the 1970s and 1980s, with stars like Elton John and Bruce Springsteen talking about their love of the store.
Solomon, who never graduated high school, eventually rose to be number 335 on the Forbes’ list of the 400 richest Americans, according to the Sacramento Bee.
He delighted in the challenges of expanding his business worldwide, to England, Japan and beyond. In 1985, he nearly went to jail after opening his store in London on Sundays, not knowing labour laws prohibited it.
“It’s like climbing up a mountain. It’s a little bit dangerous to do; a lot dangerous. But risk is part of the adventure,” he told The Associated Press in a 1988 interview about his business expansion.
Those risks are part of what made it difficult for Tower Records to survive when technology began to drastically change the music business in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Consumers began to shift to the internet to download music or to buy it from retailers such as Walmart, who offered lower prices in exchange for a less intimate customer experience than what Tower provided. Russell Solomon said in interviews years later than the debt from earlier expansions helped lead to the company’s downfall, the Bee reported.
Michael Solomon took over the business in 1998, with Russell remaining chairman of the board. The financial pressures eventually became too great in 2004, when Tower Records first filed for bankruptcy before closing its doors in 2006.
But Russell Solomon had always resisted retiring — “What would I do if I retire?” he said in 1988 — and wasn’t yet done with music. He re-entered the music business just months after Tower Records folded, opening another music store in the original drugstore location. It lasted only three years.
“Maybe I’m believing in something that’s drifting away,” he told the Sacramento Bee.
This is the legend of Russ Solomon and Tower Records | The Sacramento Bee
This is the legend of Russ Solomon and Tower Records | The Sacramento Bee
Russ Solomon, founder of Tower Records, dies in Sacramento at 92 | The Sacramento Bee
Tower Records founder Russell Solomon dead at 92 | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#34
Physicist Stephen Hawking dead at 76 | Toronto Sun
Stephen Hawking, best-known physicist of his time, has died | Toronto Sun
 
Murphy
#35
Keep reaching for the stars.
 
Curious Cdn
#36
A great mind has left us. We need more of them in these very troubled times.
 
Blackleaf
#37
Jim Bowen: Comedian and former Bullseye host dies at 80

14 March 2018
BBC News


Jim Bowen with Bullseye mascot Bully

Broadcaster and comedian Jim Bowen, best known for hosting darts-based gameshow Bullseye in the 1980s and '90s, has died at the age of 80.

His wife Phyllis confirmed the news to BBC Radio Lancashire.

The former deputy headmaster, who lived in north Lancashire, began his career as a stand-up comedian on the club circuit in the 1960s.

He became a household name when he began presenting Bullseye in 1981. The Sunday tea time show ran for 14 years.

It attracted 17.5 million viewers at its peak and involved three pairs of contestants - with a "thrower", who would throw the darts, and a "knower", who would answer general knowledge questions.


Bullseye's prizes included cars and speedboats

Bowen became known for catchphrases including "Super, smashing, great", "You can't beat a bit of Bully!" and "Let's look at what you could have won".

Another favourite phrase - "keep out of the black and in to the red, nothing in this game for two in a bed" - referred to the segments of the darts board that the players had to hit.

His warm-hearted and quick-witted rapport with the contestants was a big part of the show's appeal.

Bowen became Bullseye host after appearing on ITV show The Comedians, alongside the likes of Frank Carson, Russ Abbott and Bernard Manning.

He also had a number of TV acting roles, including in Muck and Brass, Jonathan Creek, The Grimleys, and as Hoss Cartwright in the second series of Peter Kay's Phoenix Nights.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=E6oYMmD0G2Q


Jim Bowen: Comedian and former Bullseye host dies at 80 - BBC News

Sir Ken Dodd: Comedy legend dies, aged 90


12 March 2018
BBC News



Sir Ken Dodd, creator of the Diddy Men and one of the most popular comedians of his time, has died aged 90.

The Liverpool legend had recently been released from hospital after six weeks of treatment for a chest infection.

On Friday, he had married Anne Jones, his partner of 40 years, at their house, the same one he grew up in, in the Liverpool suburb of Knotty Ash.

Lady Dodd described him as "a most life-enhancing, brilliant, creative comedian".

Speaking outside their home, she said Sir Ken "just wanted to make people happy".

She added: "I have lost a most wonderful husband. He lived to perfect his art and entertain his live and adoring audiences.

"I've been overwhelmed by the love and affection which I've already received from dear friends and the public."

Sir Paul McCartney tweeted a picture of Sir Ken with The Beatles, saying he was "a champion of his home city and comedy".



Sir Ken Dodd: Comedy legend dies, aged 90 - BBC News
Last edited by Blackleaf; Mar 17th, 2018 at 11:28 AM..
 
Blackleaf
#38
Eurovision: First winner Lys Assia dies aged 94

25 March 2018
BBC News


Switzerland's Lys Assia performing in the first Eurovision Song Contest in Lugano, Switzerland, in 1956

The first person to win the Eurovision Song Contest, Lys Assia, has died at the age of 94, competition organisers have announced.

She took the prize for Switzerland in 1956, with the song Refrain, and went on to perform in two more contests.

Lys Assia died on Saturday at the Zollikerberg Hospital in Zurich.

Eurovision described her as the "first lady" of the competition, and said it planned further tributes to her in the coming days.

Assia's triumph in the first-ever Eurovision came in Lugano, Switzerland. She finished eighth in the 1957 contest but achieved more success a year later, coming second with her song Giorgio.

View image on Twitter


Eurovision ✔
@Eurovision

We’re very sad to hear that Lys Assia - the Grande Dame of #Eurovision - has passed away. Our very first winner in 1956 and a huge supporter of the Contest ever since. The whole Eurovision family sends our condolences to Lys’ loved ones. http://bit.ly/FarewellLys @LysAssia

Mar 24, 2018

942 Likes 591 people are talking about this
Born in Rupperswil, northern Switzerland, in 1924, she began her career as a dancer before turning to singing.

Her association with Eurovision was long-lasting and in 2005 she performed in celebration of its 50th anniversary.

At the age of 87 she decided to return to the contest and tried - unsuccessfully - to represent Switzerland in 2012 and 2013.

Her death closely follows that of former Eurovision host Katie Boyle, who died at her home in the UK aged 91 last week.

Watch Lys Assia perform her winning song "Refrain" in the inaugural Eurovision Song Contest in 1956:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyqIPvOkiRk

Eurovision: First winner Lys Assia dies aged 94 - BBC News
 
Blackleaf
+1
#39
Eric Bristow: Five-time darts world champion dies aged 60

BBC News
6 April 2018


Eric Bristow was awarded an MBE for his services to sport in 1989

Five-time world darts champion Eric Bristow has died at the age of 60 after suffering a heart attack.

Professional Darts Corporation chairman Barry Hearn told BBC Sport he collapsed at a Premier League event in Liverpool.

As news of his death reached the crowd at the Echo Arena, fans repeatedly sang: "There's only one Eric Bristow."

Hearn said Bristow, known by his nickname the Crafty Cockney, would "always be a legend in the world of darts and British sport".

World champion five times between 1980 and 1986, Bristow also won five World Masters titles and was a founder player when the PDC was formed in 1993. He was awarded an MBE for his services to sport in 1989.

He also worked as a TV pundit and appeared on ITV show I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out Of Here in 2012.

"When Alexander of Macedonia was 33, he cried salt tears because there were no more worlds to conquer … Bristow's only 27." - Darts commentator Sid Waddell

Eric Bristow: Five-time darts world champion dies aged 60 - BBC Sport
 
Cannuck
#40
This thread is about notables
 
Blackleaf
+2
#41  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

This thread is about notables

Five-time world darts champion Eric Bristow is a notable.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=hvMMdAMMfMg
 
Cannuck
-1
#42
No he's not
 
Blackleaf
+1
#43
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

No he's not

Course he is. His death is mentioned by the BBC. Back in the Eighties he was darts' Ronnie O'Sullivan.
 
Cannuck
-1
#44
The BBC is irrelevant.

Ronnie O'Sullivan is not notable
 
JLM
+1 / -1
#45
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Course he is. His death is mentioned by the BBC. Back in the Eighties he was darts' Ronnie O'Sullivan.

You have to understand Cannuck (Putz), Blackleaf! In his mind??? no one but himself is notable!
 
Cannuck
+1 / -1
#46
You have to understand JLM, Blackleaf! In his mind, everyone that drunken Brittish slobs think are notable, must be notable.
 
JLM
-1
#47
There you go BL, I guess "drunken Brittish slobs" is a good example of what I was talking about in #45. Anyway it's all good humour.
 
coldstream
#48
I see people guzzling pitchers of beers at those arena sized Dart Festivals (paying little attention to the game). I'd think the life span of average British dart fan in about 60 years. Seems Eric just lived up to the type. However, of course, RiP.
 
Walter
-1
#49
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

This thread is about notables

Yer triggered again.
 
Cannuck
#50
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

There you go BL, I guess "drunken Brittish slobs"

Who else cares about the world dart champion?

Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Yer triggered again.

No, I don't support Trump
 
Walter
#51
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Who else cares about the world dart champion?

Every Legion hall I’ve ever been to.
 
JLM
-2
#52
Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post

I see people guzzling pitchers of beers at those arena sized Dart Festivals (paying little attention to the game). I'd think the life span of average British dart fan in about 60 years. Seems Eric just lived up to the type. However, of course, RiP.

I think you may be categorizing people!

Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Every Legion hall I’ve ever been to.

Hey Walter, there's no need to be answering ignorant questions from ignoramuses!
 
Blackleaf
+1
#53
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

The BBC is irrelevant.

Ronnie O'Sullivan is not notable

Probably the greatest snooker player of all time.

Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post

I see people guzzling pitchers of beers at those arena sized Dart Festivals (paying little attention to the game). I'd think the life span of average British dart fan in about 60 years. Seems Eric just lived up to the type. However, of course, RiP.

Darts is a great game. What other sport can you play - or are allowed to play - whilst knocking back the pints?

Look at Andy "The Viking" Fordham...



 
Curious Cdn
#54
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Probably the greatest snooker player of all time.



Darts is a great game. What other sport can you play - or are allowed to play - whilst knocking back the pints?

Look at Andy "The Viking" Fordham...



Darts players take steroids?
 
Blackleaf
+1
#55
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Darts players take steroids?

No. They take Foster's and Carling.
 
Cannuck
-1
#56
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Every Legion hall I’ve ever been to.

Thanks for proving my point. Legions are deserted and closing all over Canada. Nobody cares.

Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Probably the greatest snooker player of all time.

Nobody but drunken Brittish slobs gives a shit.

Quote:

Darts is a great game.

Of course it is. I have a dart board in my man cave and play all the time. I also have a Scrabble board. The world champion Scrabble player isn't notable either
 
Blackleaf
#57
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

The world champion Scrabble player isn't notable either

Scrabble isn't a popular sport.
 
Cannuck
#58
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Scrabble isn't a popular sport.

Exactly!
 
Blackleaf
#59
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Exactly!

Yep.
 
Walter
-1
#60
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Thanks for proving my point. Legions are deserted and closing all over Canada. Nobody cares.



Nobody but drunken Brittish slobs gives a shit.



Of course it is. I have a dart board in my man cave and play all the time. I also have a Scrabble board. The world champion Scrabble player isn't notable either

Yer very triggered today.
 

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