BREAKING: Ontario PC Leader Slammed With Sexual Misconduct Allegations


B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#91
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

But they don't do Dick.

Well the ones I knew in Texas did.. Black girl and her white friend.
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#92
Anonymous unproven allegations, wow! just like Roy Moore.

Patrick Brown's clever strategy is withstanding Liberal attacks: Watt
Kathleen Davis (grand daughter of former Ontario Premier Bill Davis ) shares a laugh with Patrick Brown, leader of the Ontario PC Party at the the 2017 TVO Gala.

"Brown has learned the lessons of his predecessors, and he has refused to give the Liberals an opportunity to wedge him into uncomfortable positions," writes Jaime Watt. (TOM SANDLER FOR THE TORONTO STAR)
https://www.thestar.com/opinion/star...acks-watt.html



Ontario PC leadership upheaval is better late than never

Tempting as it may be to write off the Progressive Conservative’s, Patrick Brown’s resignation could actually trigger a party renaissance.
https://www.thestar.com/opinion/star...c-opinion.html

Oh now, there you have the reason why.

Right out of the liberal playbook.

While obama makes sex in the barracks legal, bill clinton rapes the babes, hillary defends child rapist laughingly, and weinstein opens the door in his house coat, while Oprah procures for him, and weiner sexts 15 year olds, and trudeau punches opposition women in the boobs..

Oh well, back to the humpday thread.
Last edited by Danbones; Jan 26th, 2018 at 07:45 AM..
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#93
Sexual misconduct an open secret on Parliament Hill, say ex-staffers

Quote:

After allegations of sexual misconduct rocked Hollywood and Canada's arts and entertainment industry, former Parliament Hill staffers say it was only a matter of time before the spotlight turned to Canadian politics.

"It's always been a matter of when — not if — these stories will break," said Lauren Dobson-Hughes, a former NDP staffer.
Dobson-Hughes said she too faced routine sexual misconduct in her seven years on the Hill.

"Daily references to my figure, to my sex life, whether I was married," she said.
"Being grabbed and groped, being forcibly kissed."
Some political insiders have described this kind of behaviour as an open secret, many Canadians are just this week learning the extent of sexual harassment concerns in the halls of power across the country.
Three senior politicians were forced to resign this week amid allegations of sexual misconduct:

Nova Scotia Progressive Conservative leader Jamie Baillie was the first to go, stepping down Wednesday after an investigation into allegations of inappropriate behaviour .
Early Thursday morning, Patrick Brown resigned as leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party after two women came forward accusing him of sexual misconduct.
Later that day, federal Sports Minister Kent Hehr stepped away from cabinet pending an investigation into allegations of sexual harassment.

Dobson-Hughes said these stories highlight the pressures women face to bury their concerns.
Politics has its own culture and rules, she said, adding that party loyalty goes a long way in explaining why more women — and men — don't come forward.
"Nobody wants to be the one who damages their party's election chances, gets an MP dumped from caucus," Dobson-Hughes said.
Fearful they might lose their job or be blacklisted from their party, victims of harassment often see no other choice but to keep quiet, she said.
Asked whether she reported the incidents she experienced, Dobson-Hughes said harassment on the Hill was well known to MPs and senior staff, who did nothing to address it.

Rules need improvement

In December 2014, the House of Commons adopted a policy on preventing and addressing harassment.
Staff who feel they've been harassed or feel unsafe can file a formal complaint, either with their party's whip or the House of Commons chief human resources officer.
Heather Bradley, a spokesperson for the House of Commons, told CBC on Friday that the office of the chief human resources officer continues to work with party whips to ensure that MPs, and staff are made aware of their rights and responsibilities under the harassment policy.
The House of Commons encourages members and staff to participate in an online training session on harassment prevention, Bradley said, adding that an additional in-person training course is being developed.
But requiring people who say they're victims of harassment to following the policy adopted in December 2014 could pose a problem, says Jennifer Robson, a former Liberal staffer who now teaches political management at Carleton University in Ottawa.
"Harassment policies … only work if number one, people know what they are and understand their rights, and number two, trust that the process will be fair and reasonable," said Robson.
In November 2017, federal Labour Minister Patty Hajdu introduced legislation to crack down on harassment in federal workplaces, including Parliament Hill.
Once passed, the legislation would allow anyone unhappy with how their dispute is being handled to complain to the federal labour minister, who could step in to investigate and order sanctions for employers.
But political staffers will still have fewer protections than members of the Parliamentary Protective Service or those who work in the Library of Parliament, because their employer is not Parliament, but rather the politician they work for.

Breeding grounds for harassment

"When I was on the Hill, I had no idea where I would address these sorts of concerns," said Amy Kishek, a former NDP staffer.
She never experienced sexual harassment herself, but said allegations of inappropriate behaviour often came up in her discussions with female colleagues.
More often than not, she said, the incidents involved young women new to politics — volunteers, interns or staffers who had just landed their first job in an MP's office.
"You want to want to be part of the team," Kishek said, adding that staffers often feel beholden to their bosses.
"You're constantly told that for each one of you, there are tons of people who want to be there on the Hill doing that kind of work."
As part of their duties, staffers spend a significant portion of their time at after-hours events, and Kishek said they often involve heavy drinking.
It's in those settings that staffers commonly experience harassment, Kishek alleges, adding that pubs around Parliament Hill have long and notoriously been seen as breeding grounds for inappropriate behaviour.
While allegations like those surfacing this week may reinforce the idea that politics are culturally toxic to women, Robson said there is research showing that the Me Too and Time's Up movements are prompting more women than ever before to put their names on the ballot.
"They don't want to be dealing with sexual harassment," Robson said of her own students.
"They want to do politics."

Three former Green Party staffers accuse Elizabeth May of workplace bullying

Quote:

OTTAWA—Three former Green Party staffers are accusing longtime leader Elizabeth May of workplace bullying, alleging she has created a toxic work environment with conduct that includes yelling at employees and putting them down in front of their colleagues.
Rob Rainer, a manager of six non-profit organizations before he served as the party’s interim executive director in 2014, said the Green Party has failed to address and prevent a pattern of “verbal and emotional” abuse by the 63-year-old leader.

“What I witnessed was her proclivity to be negative and — most seriously — to berate, belittle and bully individuals,” Rainer said. “How we speak to other people can really, really hurt.”

May and the party’s current executive director, Emily McMillan, and another high-ranking party official flatly denied the allegations and dismissed them as nothing more than the grumbling resentment of former employees.
Rainer is calling on the party to apologize “to everyone who has been hurt by her behaviour” and bring in an external investigator to examine May’s alleged conduct.
“She should be forced to step down as leader of the party and sit as an independent MP,” Rainer said.
Diana Nunes said she worked as the party’s director of finance for more than 10 years until she was “abruptly” terminated in April 2015. She recalled numerous instances where May allegedly “threw a fit” and yelled at employees, though she herself was never the target.
Nevertheless, Nunes called May a “bully” who is “mean to the core.”
Another former staffer, Vanessa Brustolin, said she worked as the party’s Manitoba-Ontario organizer for three months last summer. She claimed that May yelled at her on three occasions and that she was let go by the party after complaining to her division boss and May’s assistants that, “if she spoke like this in private industry, she’d be fired.”
In a 50-minute interview addressing general and specific concerns raised by the former staffers, May rejected being characterized as a “bully.” Instead, she described her leadership style as generous and supportive, stating that she “habitually” gives her own money to party operatives who are in financial difficulty.
She also said she “can’t recall ever yelling or screaming” in the workplace.
“I studied for the priesthood. I’m really quite a committed Christian. I believe in treating people the way I’d like to be treated myself,” May said.
“I am the antithesis of the bully leader.”
The allegations are emerging less than two years before May’s fourth federal election as Green Party leader. In her 11 years as the party’s flag-bearer, she has become the public embodiment of the environment-focused movement, having been the Greens’ champion since the early days of Stephen Harper’s Conservative government.
But the political landscape has dramatically shifted, with a Liberal government spouting big talk on core Green issues like climate change and environmental protection. May’s party appears entrenched on the sidelines of political relevancy, consistently scoring in the mid-single digits in national polls. And she remains the only person ever elected to Parliament under the Green banner, as the party’s share of the popular vote in the last election was barely half of what they scored in 2008, her first national contest as leader.
Some longtime activists in the party are jostling for a change. Former Green Party president Mark MacKenzie, who is now a local councillor in the eastern Ontario Township of Renfrew, said he believes the party has grown too closely associated with May’s image and personality.
“Somebody else needs to be on the website. Somebody else needs to be featured. Somebody else needs to be speaking for the Green Party,” he said. “It has pretty much been the Elizabeth May Party of Canada.”
The bullying accusations appear to fly in the face of May’s frequent public calls for a better, more respectful tone in Parliament. They also contradict the glowing praise she receives from some party volunteers and staff.
Stacey Leadbetter, a longtime Green activist who ran for the party in Durham in 2015, called May “a shining example of what a Green Party leader should be.” Other former staff contacted by the Star declined to be interviewed, but indicated they had respect and admiration for May.
McMillan, the party’s executive director, said she believes the allegations stem from resentments over being let go by the party. She said the party has human resources policies and an internal dispute resolution mechanism to address issues in the workplace.
She added that, in her years working with May at the Green Party and Sierra Club — which May ran for several years before jumping into politics — she has never seen the leader yell in anger at an employee.
“I just think it’s sad that a woman in power is held to some kind of standard that you’re supposed to be meek and mild all the time,” McMillan said.
“There’s always going to be disgruntled former people in various roles who want to do damage.”
The three former staffers making the allegations paint a different portrait of the leader.
Rainer, the former interim executive director, said he submitted a written summary of his experience working with May to several party officials in November 2014.
The document, which was obtained by the Star, outlines exchanges Rainer had with May, describes how her conduct pushed him to “within hours of quitting” on several occasions, and states that by the end of his term with the party, he had “a profoundly visceral reaction to the presence of Elizabeth and even the sound of her very voice.”
Rainer’s document also alleges May told him over the phone that she had the power to have him fired, and once included him on an email to party executive officials that accused him of incompetence.
Rainer wrote that at one point he called May in an effort to smooth over their relationship, and that she allegedly told him “respect has to be earned.”
“She has a way of speaking that is very hostile — very cutting, degrading kinds of comments,” Rainer said in an interview. “Once you get in her bad books, life is going to be tough.”
Patricia Farnese, a lawyer who sits on the five-member legal entity that owns the party and hires the executive director, said she received the document from Rainer. Farnese said that it is the only time she has been given a written complaint about May’s behaviour.
The complaints were discussed and taken seriously, Farnese said, adding that she viewed them in the context of well-known friction that existed between Rainer and May over disagreements about whether party staffers are adequately paid.
That, combined with the fact that he no longer worked for the party, prompted the decision not to pursue any internal action in response to the allegations, she said.
“It seemed to us to be driven by a conflict in what (Rainer’s) job was, and what the roles of the job were,” she said.
McMillan, who did not receive Rainer’s document, said that she has never received a “formal complaint” about May’s behaviour toward party staff.
May also responded to a number of specific allegations from the former staffers.
In 2006, Nunes said that May requested that her new office in Ottawa be repainted. When May came back to the office before it was done, Nunes claimed the leader threw “a fit,” yelled at another employee and threatened to bring in former workers to get the job done.
In a separate incident, Nunes also claimed May was upset that her daughter was denied a party stipend for work she had done. Nunes alleged that May “slammed” her office door “so loud that every staff member in that place stopped and wondered what was going on.”
May said she recalled wanting her office painted in 2006, because it was “fire engine red” and she couldn’t work there without getting a headache. She said that when she came back from a trip to B.C., her office was the only room in the entire workspace that hadn’t been repainted. She suggested there was “some smirking” from staff, whom she said had supported her rival in recently-concluded party leadership race. May claimed she told them, “if you guys can’t get this done, I’ll bring in some volunteers,” but she denied yelling or getting angry about it.
“I’m not fussy about my work environment,” she said. “I’m just a workhorse.”
May also recalled that she asked for a stipend to compensate her daughter for work done during the 2011 election campaign. She said she had a “very poor” relationship with the party’s executive director at the time, and that she remembered only the decision to deny the stipend request.
“I certainly don’t remember slamming a door,” May said. “I’m not a door slammer.”
A third incident that May confirmed occurred in 2014, when she was on a conference call with a group of party employees. Nunes and Rainer, who were not on the call, said that May swore at a contract employee during the conversation about an upcoming party event. They said the employee was so distressed by the exchange that she went on sick leave and resigned a few days later.
Rainer’s summary of complaints describes the fallout of the exchange, and notes that he emailed with the employee about what happened. The report notes the employee felt May’s conduct was the worst “display of abusive bullying” the employee had ever experienced.
The employee declined to be interviewed when contacted by the Star.
May acknowledged that she swore during the call, but said she didn’t swear at the worker — she said “you’ve got to be effing kidding me” during a discussion about a web site and train tickets to an upcoming event.
“I do remember that I lost my temper, and I apologized to her right away,” May said. “I went into that telephone conversation having not had a full night’s sleep in about three days, and I was very apologetic… I said, ‘I’m so sorry. I don’t use language like that.’”
Brustolin, meanwhile, said she found May to be “belittling and demeaning” after she was hired in the spring of 2017. She claimed that May yelled at her when she tried to explain what she knew about environmental assessments during an exercise at a staff retreat about how to improve the Environmental Assessment Act. She said May started yelling at her about how she was one of the people who wrote the act, and that “I think I should know more about it than you.”
“(It was) loud to the point that everybody in the whole place just turned around and watched her yell at me,” Brustolin said.
May recalled the incident as well, but disputed Brustolin’s story. She said she was asked to give a briefing on the act, and then Brustolin chimed in about her own expertise in the area.
“I thought, well look — why don’t you do the briefing then?” May said. “And then unfortunately it became apparent that it was really back to me to do the briefing.
“It’s such a minor thing, and certainly not to make her feel bad,” May added. “I would never undercut anybody.”
Brustolin also said that a few weeks into her job, May’s chief of staff Debra Eindiguer and another staffer brought her to a meeting to give advice on how to work with the party leader. Nunes said such meetings occurred for new hires that may have to interact with May.
“They basically just talk to you about how to appropriately approach Elizabeth and speak to Elizabeth so she doesn’t yell at you,” Brustolin said.
She said she was told how to respond to May’s periodic chain emails; to avoid saying things like “‘I hope you’re enjoying a holiday,’ because she’s never on holiday.”
McMillan and May confirmed that training meetings for new staff sometimes address how to work with the leader. They said that May rarely interacts with staff at the partisan office, which is separate from her parliamentary office on the Hill. The training deals with things like how to communicate with the leader, who has different email addresses and electronic devices for various functions of her job, May said.
“It’s not like a do’s and don’ts, like I’m going to fly off the handle,” May said.
“Saying ‘have a good holiday’ is great, if I’m actually going on holiday. That’s not a rule,” she explained. “Say I walk through (the) Pride parade… The physical effort of it is exhausting. So if the next day someone says, ‘I hope you had fun at the Pride parade,’ you say: ‘Uhh, no, really… That was kind of work.’
“It’s not like, don’t say that. It’s a question of empathy,” she said.
May said the idea that she is a bully at work is simply “not a reality” and that, after so many years in politics, it’s natural that some people don’t like her. She pointed out that 93 per cent of Green members who voted in an online leadership review after the 2015 election approved of her performance.
“Not everybody is going to love every encounter,” she said. “I do my best to be a very thoughtful and kind person.”

 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+2
#94
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

One was still in high school when she says Brown, a well-known Barrie politician, asked her to perform oral sex on him.

The other, a university student who worked in his office when Brown was a federal Conservative MP, alleges Brown sexually assaulted her following an event she helped organize.

Both incidents are alleged to have happened inside Brownís home in Barrie, Ont., after the women had been drinking in his presence.

Brown, a well-reported teetotaler, was not drinking alcohol at the time of the alleged incidents, both women told CTV News.

CTV News has agreed to protect the identities of the women who have come forward.

[/url]

The whole thing stinks and should be thrown out, especially after 18 years of remaining silent. Anyone who comes forth making a serious allegation about a person should be made to divulge their identity. Talk about sniping!
 
OpposingDigit
+1
#95
I can never forgive the Conservatives for closing down hospitals and firing public employees involved with health care even though they knew full well that 5 million Canadians would be reaching old age within 15 years and be dependent upon such services.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#96
Quote: Originally Posted by OpposingDigit View Post

I can never forgive the Conservatives for closing down hospitals and firing public employees involved with health care even though they knew full well that 5 million Canadians would be reaching old age within 15 years and be dependent upon such services.

S'okay. The liberals have a plan to turn us old guys into crackers.
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
+1
#97
Quote: Originally Posted by OpposingDigit View Post

I can never forgive the Conservatives for closing down hospitals and firing public employees involved with health care even though they knew full well that 5 million Canadians would be reaching old age within 15 years and be dependent upon such services.

Our opinions of liberals and conservatives is inconsequential. They do not work for us, they work for their corporate sponsors. They is why they figure they can do whatever they please because you don't matter. They are hired to distract you from what is really going on... and that is the undisturbed rape and pillage of the planet.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#98
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Our opinions of liberals and conservatives is inconsequential. They do not work for us, they work for their corporate sponsors. They is why they figure they can do whatever they please because you don't matter. They are hired to distract you from what is really going on... and that is the undisturbed rape and pillage of the planet.

Yeah, I suppose you might be right...................in very extreme cases, but lining their own pockets takes precedence over raping and pillaging!
 
Mowich
Conservative
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by Dixie Cup View Post

All these allegations are beginning to bore me. I could probably go back oh, 15 or 20 years and I'm sure there's someone that I could accuse of something. But quite frankly, I'd rather put it behind me and let it go.


These women are absolutely astonishing in their attacks and I don't envy men right now. I'm wondering how many are searching their minds for activities they did (like stealing a kiss, or slapping a bum) and who might come after them.


This whole "metoo" situation puts those who have been raped and physically harmed in the same category as those who are accusing these men for minor missteps and it drives me bananas as true victims don't deserve all this B.S. How selfish we have become (we meaning women).


And, what has happened to innocent until proven guilty? Many of these men have said they aren't guilty and as a lawyer I heard on the radio state, these men who say they are innocent need to have the balls to stand up to those women if they are being wrongly accused instead of going and hiding. No man is safe, that's for sure and we've become a society of judges without due process. It is extremely worrisome for sure!! And, if this is the way women want to actually gain a better footing in society, I don't want anything to do with it.


And those so-called "power" women like Oprah, Mariel Streep et el should be ashamed of themselves for not saying anything for 10, 20 or more years. How many victims could they have prevented and didn't.


Anyhoo, that's my opinion.


DIx



Quote: Originally Posted by Dixie Cup View Post

Where was this "victim" 20 and 6 years ago? Why wouldn't they have complained then?


Cam you tell me exactly where you were and what exactly you were doing 20 years ago - specifically on oh, lets say August 9, 1998? What specifically were you doing that day?


That's what I'm objecting to - all this coming up NOW. If this would have happened last year or 6 months or 6 weeks ago that's one thing. But who of us here on CC can say that we haven't one way or the other been disrespectful or did something really stupid when we were younger and have regrets now?


Weinstein (or whatever his name is) showed CONSISTENT behavior for years and years and years and NOW people are coming forward? Where the hell were they when his "activities" were first discovered? He should be in jail with the key thrown away because he's a serial sexual deviant (for lack of a better word). Anyone who does what he did should face prosecution.


However, stupidity of actions taken 10, 20 and 30 years ago should not be included with those of the Weinstein ilk. Both men and women need to take responsibility for their actions but it seems to me that it's a one-way street and that's all I'm saying and it's simply not fair. When a woman says that a man sexually assaulted her in his bedroom, what the hell was she doing in his bedroom to begin with? Again, it's all on him.


Pamela Anderson was absolutely scourged because she said when a man wants to do an interview at his apartment and he opened the door in a housecoat, run the other way and she's absolutely right. Any man that does that should be tarred and feathered but women have some responsibility as well - by simply not putting themselves into the situation to begin with.


Having said that of course there's exceptions and of course sexual assault should be reported and the victim believed. I'm just saying that some of this is going too far and it takes away from the real victims who have suffered and continue to suffer from the repercussions.


So Mentalflosse, if that means as a "con bot" that I am blaming the victim, in some circumstances, I do. Many, many of these situations could have been avoided by the women. Does that absolve the men? Absolutely not - men like that are morons but women must take some responsibility and it seems to me they have none and that's not right.


JMHO


.

 
JamesBondo
#100
this is not breaking news anymore. somebody change the thread title.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#101
Quote: Originally Posted by OpposingDigit View Post

I can never forgive the Conservatives for closing down hospitals and firing public employees involved with health care even though they knew full well that 5 million Canadians would be reaching old age within 15 years and be dependent upon such services.

There's instances where it's justified, especially considering the cost of modern technical equipment, like in a small area where there are several small hospitals when one large hospital c/w all the necessary equipment can serve the population better.
 
WLDB
No Party Affiliation
#102
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post



If he was a private citizen these false allegations would never have been made. The timing on this one just does not pass the smell test.

Probably true, but thatís public life for you. He played and lost. By the looks of things so far the PCs will be fine.

Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

The whole thing stinks and should be thrown out, especially after 18 years of remaining silent. Anyone who comes forth making a serious allegation about a person should be made to divulge their identity. Talk about sniping!

Nothing to throw it out of. Itís not in court. Itís in public opinion which has different rules - no rules really. Itís always been that way.
 
Hoid
+2
#103
it isn't the public who threw the guy out its the conservative caucus. Unanimously.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#104
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

it isn't the public who threw the guy out its the conservative caucus. Unanimously.

They're all happy as clams because Patrick Brown was the flimsy part of their election bid. That's not to say that they will choose someone more electable. The Provincial PCs suffer from the same split personality that the Federsl Conservatives do, now. The very Right of the party is inordinately too powerful and they think that the world needs another Mike Harris when actually, the electorate wants another Bill Davis.

The Fed party was similarly hijacked by the Reform Party but they have spent their currency with the electorate and are probably no longer electable unless they let the Eastern (majority) moderates of their supporters back into the party. Alberta believes itself to be bigger than it is.
 
mentalfloss
#105
Remember when Roy Moore lost and this place was a ghost town for 12 hrs?

I wonder if the same thing will happen if the PCs lose in Ontario and Alberta.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#106
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Remember when Roy Moore lost and this place was a ghost town for 12 hrs?

I wonder if the same thing will happen if the PCs lose in Ontario and Alberta.

We're not looking forward to having an NDP government here in Ontario. Wynne is barely more popular than Trump, so that's what will happen if you get your wish.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#107
Quote: Originally Posted by Dixie Cup View Post

Where was this "victim" 20 and 6 years ago? Why wouldn't they have complained then?


Cam you tell me exactly where you were and what exactly you were doing 20 years ago - specifically on oh, lets say August 9, 1998? What specifically were you doing that day?


That's what I'm objecting to - all this coming up NOW. If this would have happened last year or 6 months or 6 weeks ago that's one thing. But who of us here on CC can say that we haven't one way or the other been disrespectful or did something really stupid when we were younger and have regrets now?


Weinstein (or whatever his name is) showed CONSISTENT behavior for years and years and years and NOW people are coming forward? Where the hell were they when his "activities" were first discovered? He should be in jail with the key thrown away because he's a serial sexual deviant (for lack of a better word). Anyone who does what he did should face prosecution.


However, stupidity of actions taken 10, 20 and 30 years ago should not be included with those of the Weinstein ilk. Both men and women need to take responsibility for their actions but it seems to me that it's a one-way street and that's all I'm saying and it's simply not fair. When a woman says that a man sexually assaulted her in his bedroom, what the hell was she doing in his bedroom to begin with? Again, it's all on him.


Pamela Anderson was absolutely scourged because she said when a man wants to do an interview at his apartment and he opened the door in a housecoat, run the other way and she's absolutely right. Any man that does that should be tarred and feathered but women have some responsibility as well - by simply not putting themselves into the situation to begin with.


Having said that of course there's exceptions and of course sexual assault should be reported and the victim believed. I'm just saying that some of this is going too far and it takes away from the real victims who have suffered and continue to suffer from the repercussions.


So Mentalflosse, if that means as a "con bot" that I am blaming the victim, in some circumstances, I do. Many, many of these situations could have been avoided by the women. Does that absolve the men? Absolutely not - men like that are morons but women must take some responsibility and it seems to me they have none and that's not right.


JMHO


.

I think after 20 years some of these women are under the delusion they can smell money. I'm sure that's what Ghomeshi's accusers were mainly after and by saying that I'm not under any delusion that he was any Choir boy either.

Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Remember when Roy Moore lost and this place was a ghost town for 12 hrs?

I wonder if the same thing will happen if the PCs lose in Ontario and Alberta.

That was another guy who was possibly railroaded!
Last edited by JLM; Jan 27th, 2018 at 10:06 PM..
 
White_Unifier
+1
#108
I've read a little about Ghomeshi's case. It wasn't about the money but making him en example for other men. The judge ruled in Ghomeshi's favour not just due to lack of proof beyond reasonable doubt (which is usually the case), but because the women contradicted themselves on many points. Their stories didn't make sense.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#109
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

I've read a little about Ghomeshi's case. It wasn't about the money but making him en example for other men. The judge ruled in Ghomeshi's favour not just due to lack of proof beyond reasonable doubt (which is usually the case), but because the women contradicted themselves on many points. Their stories didn't make sense.

Yep, the witnesses were pathetic and I doubt if the prosecutor has a brain in his head.
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
#110
When I look at politics, I think my friend was right. Women should run the world: politics and business, and men should be nothing more than transient breeding stock.
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#111
Right, so how do manhaters like wynne fit into your little picture doood?
There is such a thing as artificial sperm banks and gmo and cloning in the real world.

You might as well do THEM a favor, and just shoot yourself and your male offspring now

Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Yep, the witnesses were pathetic and I doubt if the prosecutor has a brain in his head.

So, Witch hunts are the way of the future are they?


Not sure if you have noticed the politicizing and or blatant sexism of the judiciary or not...

Judge under fire for 'unacceptable' comments on appearance of teen victim in sex-assault case

Quebec's Justice Minister has asked the province's judicial council to investigate a judge who commented on the physical appearance of a teenage sexual-assault victim and suggested she was flattered by the attention.

Justice Jean-Paul Braun of Quebec Court was presiding over the trial of a taxi driver last May when he made the comments.

"She's a young girl, 17. Maybe she's a little overweight but she has a pretty face, no?" the judge said in recordings first unearthed by the Journal de Montrťal.

Speaking French, the judge went on to describe the young woman as a "fleur bleue" (sentimental or romantic.) "She was a bit flattered," the judge continued. "Maybe it was the first time he showed interest in her."

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news...ticle36714544/

for example

Appeal court overturns sexual assault acquittal, finds judge relied on myths and stereotypes

In a 2-1 decision filed Wednesday, the appeal judges found that Court of Queen’s Bench Justice Terry Clackson had erred while coming to his decision by relying on an “impermissible stereotype, or myth” about the way a sexual assault victim ought to act.

Two members of the appeal court panel, Justice Marina Paperny and Justice Frederica Schutz, found that the expectation of behavioural changes in a victim of sexual assault is a stereotype, and relying on that stereotype to make a determination about reasonable doubt is an error in law
http://edmontonjournal.com/news/crim...nd-stereotypes

For another...It looks like a couple of lady judges wacked HIS wienie.

"Myths and stereotypes" eh?
Must have been his only sexual related case, good thing they found out about his attitude and removed the misogynist from his position before he did any real damage at his job.

Oh, he is still a judge?...Ooooops,

Welcome to cliffy court
Last edited by Danbones; Jan 28th, 2018 at 05:25 AM..
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#112
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

I've read a little about Ghomeshi's case. It wasn't about the money but making him en example for other men. The judge ruled in Ghomeshi's favour not just due to lack of proof beyond reasonable doubt (which is usually the case), but because the women contradicted themselves on many points. Their stories didn't make sense.

One of the really dark aspects of that case is that the women who testified against him and brought the charges in the first place were eviscerated, destroyed by the very clever defence lawyer. They ended up on trial and they were publicly disgraced. The message that came out of it was "Don't bother pressing charges. It isn't worth it" and I've noticed that with this current wave of action against sexual aggressors, the victims are launching civil suits. That way, the complainant is not put on trial.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
-1
#113
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

When I look at politics, I think my friend was right. Women should run the world: politics and business, and men should be nothing more than transient breeding stock.

Careful Cliff, the worst thing that can happen is going from one extreme to the other. I think we should just quit all the histrionics and pay each person according to the job they are doing regardless of gender race or creed or sexual orientation for that matter and then no one has anything to bitch about! (No doubt Putz will object)
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#114
CTV News anchor Paul Bliss suspended following sexual misconduct allegations

Quote:

Paul Bliss, an award-winning CTV reporter and anchor, has been suspended pending an investigation into sexual misconduct allegations more than a decade ago by a former employee.
CTV News announced the move on its Friday evening broadcast.
“Allegations have been made against a CTV news reporter. We take this very seriously and as a result have suspended Paul Bliss until an investigation is complete,” said Bell Media spokesperson Scott Henderson in a statement to the Star.
Henderson confirmed that the allegations were made by former journalist Bridget Brown, who left CTV in 2015. Brown shared her experience in a Medium blog post on Friday, a decision she made after seeing Bliss’s Tweets and broadcast coverage of the allegations against unseated PC leader Patrick Brown.
Brown said she received a call from the human resources department at CTV just hours after publishing her story.

 
White_Unifier
#115
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

One of the really dark aspects of that case is that the women who testified against him and brought the charges in the first place were eviscerated, destroyed by the very clever defence lawyer. They ended up on trial and they were publicly disgraced. The message that came out of it was "Don't bother pressing charges. It isn't worth it" and I've noticed that with this current wave of action against sexual aggressors, the victims are launching civil suits. That way, the complainant is not put on trial.

To be fair though, even when the complainant is telling the truth and the defendant did rape the complainant, proving guilt beyond reasonable doubt is very difficult since it's usually one's word against the other's. Even a rape-kit test will usually prove nothing more than a sexual act occurred (unless the rape was sufficiently physically violent) and won't reveal who might have been a willing participant in the act.

With that, I accept that an acquittal in itself does not prove the defendant's innocence on a balance of probabilities none the less. But Ghomeshi's case was a whole different ball game with the complainants contradicting themselves at every turn.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#116
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

To be fair though, even when the complainant is telling the truth and the defendant did rape the complainant, proving guilt beyond reasonable doubt is very difficult since it's usually one's word against the other's. Even a rape-kit test will usually prove nothing more than a sexual act occurred (unless the rape was sufficiently physically violent) and won't reveal who might have been a willing participant in the act.

With that, I accept that an acquittal in itself does not prove the defendant's innocence on a balance of probabilities none the less. But Ghomeshi's case was a whole different ball game with the complainants contradicting themselves at every turn.

To be fair, the complainants were put on trial, made to look like fools and a mediocre Crown Prosecution caved. The complainants were found guilty, those lying bitches.

By the way, what ever happened to Gian? He's innocent, you know just like OJ.
 
Hoid
#117
part of the enabling of sex predators is the revealing of personal details in the press.

that is one of their main tools.

so if I don't hear every detail of every case thats ok with me.

I would prefer that the cases were held behind closed doors and that the victims were allowed to testify without having the entire world listening in.

That only sets up a natural barrier that helps the predators, and they are getting enough help already.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#118
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

part of the enabling of sex predators is the revealing of personal details in the press.

that is one of their main tools.

so if I don't hear every detail of every case thats ok with me.

I would prefer that the cases were held behind closed doors and that the victims were allowed to testify without having the entire world listening in.

That only sets up a natural barrier that helps the predators, and they are getting enough help already.

If you ever get into trouble, hire the best defence lawyer that you can. It's your very best chance for innocence.
 
White_Unifier
#119
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

To be fair, the complainants were put on trial, made to look like fools and a mediocre Crown Prosecution caved. The complainants were found guilty, those lying bitches.

By the way, what ever happened to Gian? He's innocent, you know just like OJ.

I don't know if Ghomeshi was innocent or not. But he was acquitted and I accept that. What is clear is that even if he were guilty of something, at least some of the women (and maybe all of them) definitely lied.

In fact, the difficulty inherent in proving rape beyond reasonable doubt actually makes it an even more powerful weapon in the hands of a false accuser simply because, as long as the false accuser presents a plausible story, even if the defendant is acquitted, the general public will continue to question whether he could still have been guilty based on the knowledge of how difficult rape is to prove beyond reasonable doubt.

that thus makes a false accusation of rape particularly destructive of a person's public reputation even if he's acquitted.

Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

If you ever get into trouble, hire the best defence lawyer that you can. It's your very best chance for innocence.

Better yet, don't stick your dick in any strange vagina!
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#120
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

I don't know if Ghomeshi was innocent or not. But he was acquitted and I accept that. What is clear is that even if he were guilty of something, at least some of the women (and maybe all of them) definitely lied.

In fact, the difficulty inherent in proving rape beyond reasonable doubt actually makes it an even more powerful weapon in the hands of a false accuser simply because, as long as the false accuser presents a plausible story, even if the defendant is acquitted, the general public will continue to question whether he could still have been guilty based on the knowledge of how difficult rape is to prove beyond reasonable doubt.

that thus makes a false accusation of rape particularly destructive of a person's public reputation even if he's acquitted.



Better yet, don't stick your dick in any strange vagina!

Some of them are stranger than others, believe me!