Aircraft carrier HMS Prince of Wales is floated for the first time


Blackleaf
+1
#1
The second aircraft carrier to be built for the Royal Navy in the record-breaking design of the 3.1 billion HMS Queen Elizabeth has passed a major milestone - it floats.

As its sister ship undergoes emergency repairs for an embarrassing leak, HMS Prince of Wales rose up overnight as water was gradually let into its dry dock at Rosyth.

The 69,500-ton behemoth, which has been taking shape at the yard over the past three years and is due to be handed over to the Navy in 2019, was moved to a berth where the Queen Elizabeth was fitted out.

Royal Navy's second 3.1billion aircraft carrier with the same design as 'Big Lizzie' is floated for the first time

The second new Royal Navy aircraft carrier has been launched in Scotland from its dry dock in Rosyth
HMS Prince of Wales is due to be handed over to the Royal Navy in 2019 and is currently ahead of schedule
The vessel will be fitted out in a berth previously used by HMS Queen Elizabeth in the Scottish ship yard
After being fitted out, the 69,500-ton carrier will begin its own sea trials before entering service


By Darren Boyle for MailOnline
22 December 2017

The second aircraft carrier to be built for the Royal Navy in the record-breaking design of the 3.1 billion HMS Queen Elizabeth has passed a major milestone - it floats.

As its sister ship undergoes emergency repairs for an embarrassing leak, HMS Prince of Wales rose up overnight as water was gradually let into its dry dock at Rosyth.

The 69,500-ton behemoth, which has been taking shape at the yard over the past three years and is due to be handed over to the Navy in 2019, was moved to a berth where the Queen Elizabeth was fitted out.


HMS Prince of Wales was floated for the first time at Royal Dockyard Rosyth after the sluices on the dry dock were opened


A team of engineers kept the dock under close observation as water filled to float the 69,500 ton ship


The several tugs helped move Prince of Wales, pictured yesterday amid gloomy weather conditions on the River Forth

Sub Lieutenant Freddie Spreckley who recently joined the ship's company said: 'For me, seeing water surround the ship has really made it transform from being a ship in build to a ship preparing to go to sea.

'I was privileged to be one of the last few people to walk underneath the ship before the sluices opened and flooded the dock. It was very exciting - a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity - to be involved with this engineering milestone in the ship's life and historic moment for the Royal Navy.'

The vessel's construction is running ahead of schedule due to lessons learned while completing her sister ship.

Captain Ian Groom, senior naval officer on the vessel, said: 'It has been a massive team effort and I am proud of every individual contribution. It is a fitting end to the Year of the Navy to have HMS Queen Elizabeth commissioned and HMS Prince of Wales undocked and afloat for the first time.

'As the second of her class, HMS Prince of Wales is of strategic significance ensuring continuous carrier strike capability. Working as one team we are delivering an unmistakable sign of commitment to the defence of our great nation and that of our allies.'


HMS Prince of Wales was named in a ceremony at the Royal Dockyard in Rosyth in September

The Royal Navy confirmed the vessel is already 3,000 tonnes heavier than her sister ship at the same stage of construction.

The MoD released video footage of yesterday's launch.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWah0eOIva4

The ship's gas turbines and generators are expected to be fired up for the first time during the middle of next year, with sea trials in 2019.

The now Portsmouth-based HMS Queen Elizabeth, the largest, most powerful and most expensive ship to be built for the Royal Navy in its history, was the subject of embarrassing revelations this week after it emerged it had a leak.

The 919ft-long vessel set out for sea trials over the summer and is believed to have been taking on water for some time due to a faulty seal.

The Government has insisted that repairs will not cost the taxpayer, with Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson claiming the money would come 'from the contractors who built her'.

It is understood the cost of fixing the leak will not cost millions as reported, but the bill could reach into the hundreds of thousands.


HMS Prince of Wales is being constructed at the Royal Dockyard at Rosyth and is running ahead of schedule



Prince of Wales is being constructed ahead of schedule due to lessons learned from HMS Queen Elizabeth which began its sea trials earlier this year

Mr Williamson said: 'This is the reason why we have the sea trials, to make sure that everything is working absolutely perfectly.'

Repairs to the damaged seal are currently taking place with a Multicat support boat called Uncle Bill at her stern.

Divers have been inspecting the area around the vessel's 33-tonne propellers.

A Royal Navy spokesman said the 'repairs under contract are already under way alongside in Portsmouth', and the next round of sea trials will take place in the new year.

He said sea trials were 'precisely for finding manageable teething problems like this and rectifying them', adding that the ship would continue to be 'rigorously' tested before she entered service.

The warship, the biggest and most powerful built by the UK, was accepted into the Royal Navy fleet by the Queen earlier this month.

During her estimated half-a-century working life, the vessel can be pressed into action for tasks such as high intensity war fighting or providing humanitarian aid and disaster relief.

The other HMS Prince of Wales

The state-of-the-art aircraft carrier is the seventh Royal Navy vessel to carry the name HMS Prince of Wales.

The first ship to carry the name was a captured French privateer from the 17th century.

Then, the second Prince of Wales was an armed merchantman during the 1750s.

Eventually, the Royal Navy commissioned a 74-gun battleship which fought the French during the 1770s.

Several of the remaining vessels to carry the name were of poor quality, or obsolete by the time they entered service.

One was converted into a training vessel for cadets.

Even the most famous Prince of Wales suffered significant problems from the moment it was designed in the 1930s.


An earlier Prince of Wales, pictured here being launched from the Cammell Laird shipyard in Birkenhead, was sunk by Japanese bombers in December 1941 - despite having survived an encounter with the German pocket battleship Bismark


Prime Minister Winston Churchill, pictured, used HMS Prince of Wales to travel to Newfoundland to meet President Roosevelt

The King George V battleship was the second of the type to enter service. However, it was designed to adhere to strict arms limitation treaties of the time - which were designed to stop a naval arms race.

In May 1941, when still being tested, and despite having problems with her 14-inch guns, she was sent off to hunt the Bismark.

The Bismark blasted HMS Hood out of the water, although Prince of Wales managed to hit the German battleship causing it some damage.

Later Prince of Wales took Churchill to Newfoundland to meet President Roosevelt and later served in the Mediterranean.

However, her final mission was as part of Force Z in the Far East. She was sent to Singapore alongside the battle-cruiser Repulse, when they were attacked by Japanese bombers in December 1941.

Prince of Wales and Repulse became the first capital ships to have been sunk solely by air bombardment - which changed the face of naval warfare.

Some 800 men were lost on both vessels.


Prince of Wales, pictured, became the first battle ship to be sunk exclusively by use of air power in December 1941


Read more: Royal Navy's second 3.1billion aircraft carrier floats | Daily Mail Online
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Last edited by Blackleaf; Dec 26th, 2017 at 02:09 PM..
 
coldstream
+1
#2
White elephant with a keel.



Type 26 Frigate. Much more sensible. L400M per ship vs. L3B + L3B for 36 F35s and 4 Merlin Helicopters. They've yet to find a mission for it beyond the Flag Ship of Parades of the Fleet.
 
Blackleaf
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post

White elephant with a keel.

How? The Russians and Chinese are planning new carriers - you should see the size of the monsters that China is planning. It's important Britain has these and the RN continues to be one of only two Blue Water navies.
 
coldstream
-1
#4
You need an Empire, or aspirations of Empire, to justify a Aircraft Carrier. The Chinese and US still feel they have to 'Project Power' around the Globe. That's a distant memory for Britain.. and i would say that the Carriers are far over valued as to their ability to protect sovereignty at home. That is the primary role of any military.. land, sea or air.
 
Sorrow
#5
Biggest the best carrier the new British.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post

You need an Empire, or aspirations of Empire, to justify a Aircraft Carrier. The Chinese and US still feel they have to 'Project Power' around the Globe. That's a distant memory for Britain.. and i would say that the Carriers are far over estimated as to their ability to protect sovereignty at home. That is the primary role of any military, land, sea or air.

Britain is ahead of China on global power projection.

In fact, China isn't even capable of it. Only Britain and America, and probably France, can project armed forces to anywhere in the world within 24 hours.

As for the leak onboard HMS Queen Elizabeth - the British press are getting themselves in a tizzy over this. Experts on naval matters will tell you that's it's perfectly normal for new vessels to leak. It's why they have a bilge and go on sea trials.
 
taxslave
+1
#7
Gotta love them new 3D printers.
 
White_Unifier
+2
#8  Top Rated Post
How's the Royal Credit Card holding up? It's nice to have a snazzy aircraft carrier, but it's useless without lots of manpower and fuel (none of which is free).
 
darkbeaver
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post

You need an Empire, or aspirations of Empire, to justify a Aircraft Carrier. The Chinese and US still feel they have to 'Project Power' around the Globe. That's a distant memory for Britain.. and i would say that the Carriers are far over valued as to their ability to protect sovereignty at home. That is the primary role of any military.. land, sea or air.

I do not understand the building of these giant targets with todays missile and aircraft capabilities they have I think obviously outlived thier mobile airport status of the days of bombing helpless countries to dust. It,s impossible for a satillite launched weapon to miss.
 
petros
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

I do not understand the building of these giant targets with todays missile and aircraft capabilities they have I think obviously outlived thier mobile airport status of the days of bombing helpless countries to dust. It,s impossible for a satillite launched weapon to miss.

Sea Whiz!

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phalanx_CIWS
 
Curious Cdn
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post

White elephant with a keel.



Type 26 Frigate. Much more sensible. L400M per ship vs. L3B + L3B for 36 F35s and 4 Merlin Helicopters. They've yet to find a mission for it beyond the Flag Ship of Parades of the Fleet.

We should buy those. I'm betting that we do.

Btw, this is the latest Canadian warship ... The AOPS (HMCS) De Wolf ... first of class getting her bow.

http://vimeo.com/247352124
Last edited by Curious Cdn; Dec 26th, 2017 at 04:35 PM..
 
coldstream
#12
Some cold hard reality.

https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...eth-royal-navy

from the article


In reality, the carriers and the new fleet of Dreadnought submarines are irrelevant to Britain’s security needs. They are of no use against terrorism, described by successive prime ministers as the most serious threat facing the country, or against cyberwarfare, which also preoccupies security chiefs. The carriers, like the nuclear missile submarines, are status symbols.

The carriers were described to me by a former chief of defence staff as “vulnerable metal cans”. The navy says that in a “high-threat environment” they will be protected by two destroyers, two anti-submarine frigates, a submarine, a tanker and a supply ship. That is a huge commitment for a navy that has just 19 destroyers and frigates and six available subs.

And a growing body of military commentators say the carriers will be vulnerable to long-range, high-speed missiles being developed by Russia and China, cited by the Ministry of Defence as the two powers likely to threaten the UK in the future, as well as to attacks by underwater drones, a fast-developing technology.


Another article states the cost of the F35B could be so prohibitive that the vessels might never carry more than 12 on their far flung missions.
Last edited by coldstream; Dec 26th, 2017 at 04:57 PM..
 
Curious Cdn
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post

Some cold hard reality.

https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...eth-royal-navy

from the article


In reality, the carriers and the new fleet of Dreadnought submarines are irrelevant to Britain’s security needs. They are of no use against terrorism, described by successive prime ministers as the most serious threat facing the country, or against cyberwarfare, which also preoccupies security chiefs. The carriers, like the nuclear missile submarines, are status symbols.

The carriers were described to me by a former chief of defence staff as “vulnerable metal cans”. The navy says that in a “high-threat environment” they will be protected by two destroyers, two anti-submarine frigates, a submarine, a tanker and a supply ship. That is a huge commitment for a navy that has just 19 destroyers and frigates and six available subs.

And a growing body of military commentators say the carriers will be vulnerable to long-range, high-speed missiles being developed by Russia and China, cited by the Ministry of Defence as the two powers likely to threaten the UK in the future, as well as to attacks by underwater drones, a fast-developing technology.


Another article states the cost of F35B could be so prohibitive that the vessels might never carry more than 12 on their far flung missions.

They designed a glass of carriers around a single (untested) aircraft type. If someone in a private corporation took a bone-headed gamble like that, they would be out on his/her ear. I have blogged with Brits who say "Oh, well. What a brilliant helicopter carrier". Well, they have those already and they run about a third of the cost to build. Or they bring up the fact that they can operate V-22 Ospreys from them but the point of those is that they don't need carriers. You could fly them off of the empty decks of container ships. They are beautiful ships but pretty much useless ones. Those and their old Trident Subs have sucked the UKs defence budget dry ... the latter weapon being a modern day Maginot line.
 
darkbeaver
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Sea Whiz!

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phalanx_CIWS

Yup, some nation got hypersonic also, an estimate of all capital surface ships survival time during WWW whatever is aboot two weeks that includes tankers tugs and barges.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

How's the Royal Credit Card holding up? It's nice to have a snazzy aircraft carrier, but it's useless without lots of manpower and fuel (none of which is free).

 

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