UK's Christian heritage stressed in PM's Christmas message


Blackleaf
+1
#1
Britons should "take pride" in their country's Christian heritage at Christmas, Theresa May has said.

In her Christmas message, the prime minister said there is a "confidence... that in Britain you can practise your faith free from question or fear".

She also praised the emergency services for their Grenfell Tower and Manchester and London terror attacks responses.

UK's Christian heritage stressed in PM's Christmas message


BBC News
24 December 2017



Britons should "take pride" in their country's Christian heritage at Christmas, Theresa May has said.

In her Christmas message, the prime minister said there is a "confidence... that in Britain you can practise your faith free from question or fear".

She also praised the emergency services for their Grenfell Tower and Manchester and London terror attacks responses.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn's message says people should help those "cut off and lonely", and in war-torn nations.

The Lib Dem leader Vince Cable spoke of the need for more affordable housing, and mental health support, while SNP First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon paid tribute to people working as volunteers at Christmas.

Inspiring heroes

Mrs May began her message by thanking "those whose service to others means they will be spending time away from their loved ones this Christmas".

She paid tribute to the "men and women in our armed forces, whose humbling bravery and daily sacrifices help to ensure the security of our nation and our allies around the world.

And she spoke of "the heroes in our emergency services, whose courage and dedication so inspired the nation in response to tragedy at Grenfell Tower and the abhorrent terrorist attacks in Manchester and London."

Mrs May also praised volunteers who give up their time at Christmas to take on faith inspired projects, and aid agency staff working abroad.

The prime minister, who grew up in a vicarage, added: "As we celebrate the birth of Christ, let us celebrate all those selfless acts - and countless others - that epitomise the values we share: Christian values of love, service and compassion that are lived out every day in our country by people all faiths and none."

Mrs May referred to Christians in some parts of the Middle East being denied religious freedoms and the "sickening persecution of the Rohingya Muslims".

She concluded: "This Christmas, whatever our faith, let us come together confident and united in the values we share."

Corbyn's 'Christmas wish'



Mr Corbyn said Christmas was "a time of the year when we think about others. Like those who have no home to call their own or who are sleeping rough on our streets.

"We think about those who feel cut off and lonely. Many older citizens to whom we owe so much will be spending what should be a time of joy alone.

"We think of others such as carers who look after loved ones, people with disabilities or dementia."

He said thoughts were also with those "living in nations like Yemen, Syria and Libya in fear of bombs and bullets, of injury and death".

He said: "None of this is inevitable. We pride ourselves on being a compassionate nation.

"My Christmas wish is that we all do more to help bring about the kind of society and world we want to live in."

In her message, Ms Sturgeon said Christmas was a time of celebration, but also a "time for thinking about and helping others".

The SNP leader added: "For many people - for example workers in our emergency services, our health service and in our armed forces - Christmas isn't a holiday at all.

"Your hard work is appreciated all the year round, but is particularly valued at Christmas time. So over this festive period, let's thank those who are working so hard on our behalf."

UK's Christian heritage stressed in PM's Christmas message - BBC News
Last edited by Blackleaf; Dec 24th, 2017 at 12:35 PM..
 
coldstream
+2
#2  Top Rated Post
Quote:

Britons should "take pride" in their country's Christian heritage at Christmas

Sounds quite politically incorrect.. undiverse, uninclusive, intolerant, nonmulticultural... good for her. I might have rather used the word 'identity' for 'heritage'.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post

Sounds quite politically incorrect.. undiverse, uninclusive, intolerant, nonmulticultural... good for her

Her father, Hubert Brasier, was a Church of England clergyman who was chaplain of an Eastbourne hospital. He later became vicar of Enstone and Heythrop in Oxfordshire and, finally, of St Mary's at Wheatley, to the east of Oxford. She is a committed Anglican.
 
Hoid
+1 / -1
#4
Britain's "christian heritage" is creating their own religion so that they could get divorced.
 
Walter
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Britain's "christian heritage" is creating their own religion so that they could get divorced.

They created their own denomination, not religion, so the King could get a divorce. Words and their meanings get in the way of agendas.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

They created their own denomination, not religion, so the King could get a divorce. Words and their meanings get in the way of agendas.

The C of E includes a pretty wide spectrum of Christians ranging from austere Puritans through to Roman-style bells & incense & flash pots High Anglicans. It took an horrible and exceptionally bloody civil war to reach that compromise. One of the side effects of that blood-letting was New England.
 
Cliffy
+2
#7
What? No mention of the Celtic or Pagan heritage? Christmas is, after all, a pagan holiday that was hijacked by the church.
 
Curious Cdn
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

What? No mention of the Celtic or Pagan heritage? Christmas is, after all, a pagan holiday that was hijacked by the church.

That was a couple of days back. Wanna see my burnt out wicker basket?
 
coldstream
#9
Cliffy and wench at Stonehenge celebrating the Yule.. with ale and wild boar
 
Tecumsehsbones
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post

Sounds quite politically incorrect.. undiverse, uninclusive, intolerant, nonmulticultural... good for her. I might have rather used the word 'identity' for 'heritage'.

And anti-Catholic, in case you missed it.
 
coldstream
+1
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

And anti-Catholic, in case you missed it.

Some Catholics still consider themselves Christians, t-bones.
 
Blackleaf
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Christmas is, after all, a pagan holiday that was hijacked by the church.

 
Hoid
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

What? No mention of the Celtic or Pagan heritage? Christmas is, after all, a pagan holiday that was hijacked by the church.

there would be no christmas if the ancient priests didn't have to figure out some way to entice all those pagans into the flock.
 
Cliffy
-1
#14
There are more and more pagans of various persuasions all over the world celebrating around Winter Solstice.
Pagan just means people of the land.

Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

there would be no christmas if the ancient priests didn't have to figure out some way to entice all those pagans into the flock.

They did use other persuasive tactics, like slaughtering those who would not convert.
Also, Christmas has been taken over by the Capitalist and has very little resemblance to a Christian holiday.
 
Blackleaf
+2
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

There are more and more pagans of various persuasions all over the world celebrating around Winter Solstice.
Pagan just means people of the land.


They did use other persuasive tactics, like slaughtering those who would not convert.
Also, Christmas has been taken over by the Capitalist and has very little resemblance to a Christian holiday.

It was actually the pagans who ripped-off Christmas from the Christians...

Oh, Lighten Up, Christmas Is NOT a Pagan Holiday.


DECEMBER 9, 2016 BY BENJAMIN L. COREY
325 COMMENTS



Here’s an interesting factoid: There’s a considerable group of Christians who hate Christmas with the same furor that they hate Halloween.

Like, for real.

Maybe if you grew up outside the bounds of Christian fundamentalism you’re unaware of this group, but I assure you, they’re out there. Each year around this time my Facebook newsfeed gets flooded with status updates and MEMEs denouncing the holiday and those Christians who choose to celebrate it.

Now, why in the world would Christians– people who claim to follow Jesus– be so incensed over a holiday that celebrates his birth? The reason for that is these Christians believe that Christmas is a Pagan holiday– or at least, that Christmas co-opted a Pagan holiday.

Even many Christians who love Christmas believe in this association with Christmas and an ancient Pagan holiday. The basic explanation goes like this: Early Christians lived in a Pagan culture that had many celebrations and festivals. In order to slowly influence that culture, it is claimed that Christians began their own celebrations on those same dates in order to provide culture with an alternative, Christian celebration (sometimes referred to as “contextualization”).

This is claimed to be the case with many Christian holidays. For example, many errantly claim that Easter is rooted in a Pagan holiday for the fertility goddess Eostre, even though the evidence for that is dubious. Similarly with Christmas, it is argued that December 25th was first the celebration of the “Birth of the Unconquered Sun” before Christians tried to hijack it.

However, these arguments are ones made by scholars in more recent times (say, 17th century claims for the Christmas myth), and don’t hold up to deeper scrutiny. In fact, there’s a far stronger case to be made that the Pagan holiday of the Birth of the Unconquered Sun was a rip-off of Christmas– not the other way around.

William J. Tighe in Calculating Christmas, gives a full explanation for how this myth of Christmas being a co-opt of the Birth of the Unconquered Sun came to be. While you can read his extended research here, I’ll break it down and explain the essence of how the Pagan connection is actually wrong at best, and backwards at worst:

As early as the 2nd century Christians attempted to pin-point the dates of the birth of Christ and the date of his execution. Obviously from the Gospel narratives we have enough clues as to be able to narrow down the date of the crucifixion based upon which years passover fell on a Friday. We now know, as Tighe asserts, that the crucifixion of Christ could have only been at passover in AD 30 or 33. However, by the end of the first century/beginning of the second century, it was widely believed/accepted that the crucifixion occurred on the 25th of March, AD 29.

This brings us to a second point to consider: something called Integral Age.

There was the common belief in Judaism and early Christianity that saints died on their birthday or the day they were conceived. This means, for these early Christians, that March 25 was not only the date of the crucifixion but was also either Jesus’ birthday, or the day that Mary conceived him. Eventually, viewing March 25th as the day Jesus was conceived became the accepted view– adding 9 months to this would make the date of his birth December 25th. (Tighe also points out that some early Christians insisted that the crucifixion was on April 6th, and still celebrate the birth of Christ on January 6th.)

Thus, the early Christians were not attempting to hijack a Pagan holiday at all– they just had a really weird way of figuring out when your birthday was.

Now, that brings us to the Pagan holiday that did exist on December 25th. This holiday was introduced by Emperor Aurelian in AD 274, after the acceptance of December 25th being the day Christians celebrated the birth of Christ. As Tighe states:

“The pagan feast which the Emperor Aurelian instituted on that date in the year 274 was not only an effort to use the winter solstice to make a political statement, but also almost certainly an attempt to give a pagan significance to a date already of importance to Roman Christians… Thus the ‘pagan origins of Christmas’ is a myth without historical substance.”

So, is Christmas a Pagan holiday?

No.

Did early Christians decide to celebrate the birth of Christ as an alternative to a holiday to honor the sun? No again.

Yes, Christians and Pagans in Rome celebrated a holiday on the same day– but it was Aurelian who tried to co-opt a Christian holiday, instead of the reverse that is so often claimed.

Follow follow BLC on Facebook:


Read more at Oh, Lighten Up, Christmas Is NOT a Pagan Holiday.

Oh, Lighten Up, Christmas Is NOT a Pagan Holiday.
 
avro25
#16
What aren't you in church?
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by avro25 View Post

What aren't you in church?

Twice today (I sing in one)
 
Hoid
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

There are more and more pagans of various persuasions all over the world celebrating around Winter Solstice.
Pagan just means people of the land.


They did use other persuasive tactics, like slaughtering those who would not convert.
Also, Christmas has been taken over by the Capitalist and has very little resemblance to a Christian holiday.

in the early centuries of christendom the christens had no power to speak of. They were themselves victimized.

By the Dark Ages they were getting into the all powerful thing
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by coldstream View Post

Some Catholics still consider themselves Christians, t-bones.

Don't know much history, do you? Britain is historically the most virulent and violent anti-Catholic country of all.
 
avro25
-1
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Twice today (I sing in one)

Good for you.

Wasn't asking you btw.
 
coldstream
+1
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Don't know much history, do you? Britain is historically the most virulent and violent anti-Catholic country of all.

I'm steeped in the history of persecutions of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I against Catholics, and especially Catholic clergy. Edmund Campion and Edmund Arrowsmith are favourites of mine. Both were hung, drawn and quartered for the 'treason' of not professing the English Faith. But like a branch cut from the root the Church of England is dying.

It has lost its moral vision. It has ordained women and openly homosexual priests and bishops, blesses same sex unions, promotes artificial contraception, is now silent on abortion and euthanasia if not out rightly supportive. It has faced inner revolts and schisms over its liberalism, relativism and rejection of scripture .

The decline in its membership has been so precipitous that it might cease to exist by the middle of the 21st Century. Who needs a church that tells you to make up your own rules and that there are no consequences for your decisions.

So real Christianity will likely survive in Britain, grafted on to its original trunk. The Catholic Church has attempted to form an Anglican Rite of RCC, which accepts some of the forms and rituals of the Anglicans but retains the rigour of its own moral dogma, with mixed results so far.
Last edited by coldstream; Dec 24th, 2017 at 04:08 PM..
 
Cliffy
+1
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

It was actually the pagans who ripped-off Christmas from the Christians...
Oh, Lighten Up, Christmas Is NOT a Pagan Holiday.

You poor sap. Winter Solstice has been celebrated by pagans for tens of thousand years. I think that predates Christmas by quite a few thousand years.
 
avro25
#23
Fluffy/Cliffy used words.

Mark the date.
 
Hoid
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

You poor sap. Winter Solstice has been celebrated by pagans for tens of thousand years. I think that predates Christmas by quite a few thousand years.

It's why putting the Christ back into Christmas is so funny.

They took a pagan festival and created Chirstmas
 
Murphy
#25
You are just angry, MF. You are angry because, as a frustrated Jew, who long ago lost his love for God, you now it necessary to lash out and spread your personal indecision and misery. You throw it wherever you see happiness.

There is an empty space where your soul once was. You are hollow. Bereft of a future or joy because you reject the smiles of others. You feel that everyone must suffer as you do.

Part of it is living in Mississauga. A collection of many lost souls. Cities often have that effect on people. But it doesn't have to be that way. Religion is not for you. You need a change of mind. A change of direction.

Look to Buddhism. It is not a religion. It is a way of looking at life. No churches exist for it. No attendance is required of you. All you are asked to do is think. reason through your own life. The answers lie within, but they are locked inside by the loathing you have for others.

Free yourself. Become one with the planet on which you reside.



Buddha is often shown fat and laughing, but Gautama Buddha was thin. It was said that he too, loved to laugh. What Buddha looked like is not important. The message he spoke was. Live your life with joy.

https://meditationinmadison.org/

These instructions are scientific methods to improve our human nature. A gift from Geshe Kelsang Gyatso Rinpoche.
Last edited by Murphy; Dec 24th, 2017 at 07:27 PM..
 
darkbeaver
+1
#26
I,m a Christian, tomorrow the minutes go positive and every second of Gods blessed light is precious beyond imagination,
 
Danbones
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Twice today (I sing in one)

That was the police station

I'm guessing it's the one on church St.
 
Murphy
+1
#28
You are a child of the universe.

Desiderata

Go placidly amid the noise and haste,
and remember what peace there may be in silence.
As far as possible without surrender
be on good terms with all persons.

Speak your truth quietly and clearly;
and listen to others,
even the dull and the ignorant;
they too have their story.
Avoid loud and aggressive persons,
they are vexations to the spirit.

If you compare yourself with others,
you may become vain and bitter;
for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.
Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.

Keep interested in your own career, however humble;
it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.

Exercise caution in your business affairs;
for the world is full of trickery.
But let this not blind you to what virtue there is;
many persons strive for high ideals;
and everywhere life is full of heroism.

Be yourself.

Especially, do not feign affection.
Neither be cynical about love;
for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment
it is as perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the counsel of the years,
gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune.
But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.
Beyond a wholesome discipline,
be gentle with yourself.

You are a child of the universe,
no less than the trees and the stars;
you have a right to be here.
And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore be at peace with God,
whatever you conceive Him to be,
and whatever your labors and aspirations,
in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul.
With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world.

Be cheerful.

Strive to be happy.

Max Ehrmann - 1952
 
darkbeaver
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Her father, Hubert Brasier, was a Church of England clergyman who was chaplain of an Eastbourne hospital. He later became vicar of Enstone and Heythrop in Oxfordshire and, finally, of St Mary's at Wheatley, to the east of Oxford. She is a committed Anglican.

And what do you suppose any of them know about God?

What time is it? hahahahahah
 
Murphy
+1 / -1
#30
You really shouldn't converse with Brits. They are known disease carriers.

 

Similar Threads

9
Christmas message from Her Majesty the Queen
by FiveParadox | Dec 25th, 2015
12
Dexter's Christmas Message
by Dexter Sinister | Dec 9th, 2006
1
christmas message
by peapod | Dec 14th, 2004