This U.S. City Now Requires Solar Panels on all New Homes


B00Mer
#1
This U.S. City Now Requires Solar Panels on all New Homes

From mid-September onward, solar panels will be mandatory for new homes in South Miami, Florida. The law which was passed with a four-to-one majority states that builders must install 16 m (175 ft) of solar panel per 93 m (1000 ft) of sunlit roof area, or one panel with a 2.75 kilowatt capacity per 93 m (1000 ft) of living space; the rule also extends to some renovations.

The changes are affirmations that South Miami is marching towards a clean energy future, despite the topic causing friction due to the bent of its Republican leadership, complex deals with fossil fuel-based utilities companies, and numerous battles between citizens and energy suppliers concerning whether independent sellers can compete with energy suppliers.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9oNYDv_-uc

Phillip Stoddard, the mayor of the city, told the Miami Herald: Were the first city in the United States outside of California to approve this [] Its not going to save the world by itself, but its going to get people thinking about [solar].

However, the law has caused controversy as some parties believe it de-incentivises new buildings. This is because the cost of implementing solar panels will fall on building companies rather than the government covering cost. Eric Montes de Oca, president-elect of the Miami chapter of the Latin Builders Association, further argued to the Miami Herald that the measure essentially means that anyone who does not want to have solar panels, [is] not welcome to live in South Miami. This, I would argue, runs counter to our individual freedoms.

South Miami joins a growing number of U.S. cities which have implemented similar rulings: in January, San Francisco began enforcing a rule that buildings 10 stories or shorter have to have either solar panels or water heaters, and Lancaster in California has passed measures to ensure that new houses are renewably self-sufficient.

source: https://futurism.com/this-u-s-city-n...all-new-homes/

Awesome Sauce
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+3
#2  Top Rated Post
In areas that far south, making everybody save on their electricity bill is a good move.
 
White_Unifier
#3
Not a bad idea in itself. But to help the poor, we might want to compensate by removing minimum lot size or minimum parking restrictions.

With people spending more on more expensive homes, some might not afford a car, so more bicycle and pedestrian paths will be needed along with higher density development (e.x more town homes) and more mixed residential, commercial, and light industry.

In other words, as long as NIMBYism stays at bay, the market will adapt. Otherwise it will fail miserably.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#4
The poor rarely buy houses.
 
Danbones
+2
#5
Also solar roof panels reflect and absorb heat energy, keeping it out of the house physically, and provide free energy for the cooling units, as opposed to using sunlight to supply energy for heating in a place like Canada when there really is not much of it available in the heating season.
 
taxslave
+1
#6
Must be s few solar panel salespeople on council.Or more likely just own councilors.
 
justlooking
+2
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Must be s few solar panel salespeople on council.Or more likely just own councilors.


Nahh, all they need is a couple of SJW housewives who have no idea about the toxicity of making panels,
and limited lifespans. And maybe a guy who sells the equipment to hook into the grid.
 
Curious Cdn
#8
They 'll be under water in a century, anyway. Problem solved!
 
Danbones
#9
Hillary may have been selected by then!
She'll save them!
 
White_Unifier
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

The poor rarely buy houses.

Different degrees of poor.

Also, even those who don't buy, rent. If buying becomes more expensive, then that cost will get passed down to the renter.
 
mentalfloss
#11
<insert CC negative spin here>
 
B00Mer
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

The poor rarely buy houses.

Houses are pretty cheap in the USA and there is such of a thing call tote-to-note..

Tote the note financing is a type of financing refers to car dealers that offer car buyers with bad credit a chance to get into a vehicle when they have been turned down by other lenders.

It's now moving into the home industry..
 
captain morgan
+2
#13
I'd imagine it's much like the payday loan cycle of poverty
 
DaSleeper
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

Also solar roof panels reflect and absorb heat energy, keeping it out of the house physically, and provide free energy for the cooling units, as opposed to using sunlight to supply energy for heating in a place like Canada when there really is not much of it available in the heating season.

Contradiction in terms?....or oxymoron?
Light energy creates the electricity
The heat energy from sunlight just heats up the surface of the panel and directly to the roof unless there is a good air space between the roof and the solar panel
 
petros
#15
Get your phot on, it's going to be sunny.

Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Houses are pretty cheap in the USA and there is such of a thing call tote-to-note..

Tote the note financing is a type of financing refers to car dealers that offer car buyers with bad credit a chance to get into a vehicle when they have been turned down by other lenders.

It's now moving into the home industry..

Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

I'd imagine it's much like the payday loan cycle of poverty

Rent to own. It's nothing new.
 
captain morgan
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Rent to own. It's nothing new.

Absolutely.

no doubt that it can work, however it is much more susceptible to predatory lending and hinky contractual terms
 
petros
#17
No equity until the terms are met.
 
Jinentonix
#18
Gonna be interesting to see how state govts will make up the tax shortfall if more cities do this.