What should Canada give up in new NAFTA


Twin_Moose
Conservative
#91
Do you think they couldn't make a deal Pete?
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+2
#92
We should be looking into supersonic drone technology, we are handing out money to bombardier for nothing maybe we could make it worth something for national security.
 
Gilgamesh
#93
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Do you think Canada could develop another cutting edge fighter through the Bombardier program?

Bombardier? No wucking fay. Sad to say, we missed that boat.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#94
Why not? they have the facilities, just not smart enough?
 
Hoid
#95
lol Raytheon

on a serious note - no - Bombardier would never be allowed to develop a fighter to compete against US fighters.

Boeing took Bombardier to court for selling a plane that Boeing does not even compete against

Obviously anyone making fighters in America would demand trade protection against any Bombardier fighter aircraft
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#96
I'm not saying that there won't be challenges, Boeing does have plants in Canada and would have a legit beef, Canada could throw out national security on this to make it happen, and use the Tariff and Boeing dispute as evidence in support of it, nothing is impossible.
 
Hoid
#97
Canadian aerospace has been pretty much reduced to branch plant economics - just like the auto industry.

Bombardier is an exception - and look at the "support" this last man standing gets from the conservatives.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
#98
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Canadian aerospace has been pretty much reduced to branch plant economics - just like the auto industry.

Bombardier is an exception - and look at the "support" this last man standing gets from the conservatives.

Sink or swim is my motto .
 
MHz
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

We should be looking into supersonic drone technology, we are handing out money to bombardier for nothing maybe we could make it worth something for national security.

Drones with metal detection coils and gps tags for the hits, open up the tundra to eco sensitive explorers. Ships would be able to fly 10 drones 24/7 as they cruise the uncharted bays and inlets
 
Hoid
#100
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Sink or swim is my motto .

well there you go.

no need to keep crying about a pipeline that is never going to get built.
 
Mowich
Conservative
+1
#101
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Give them Trudeau


Hell, let's give them both up - the CBC and PM pretty socks.
 
spilledthebeer
#102
Quote: Originally Posted by Gilgamesh View Post

What should Canada give up?

Trudeau!


================================================== ================================================== ====


How about that????????????????????????????????????


Gilgamush for brains made a FUNNY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


And he was even sensible for ONCE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



Yes- having a Trudeau in your political life is like having a visit from CANCER!!!!!!!!!!!!


But Gil- Our idiot Boy is JUST ONE MAN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


He would be NOTHING without that party behind him!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


All those CLODS supporting the same FAILED policies!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


All those HOGS at the trough!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Our idiot Boy is a virtue signalling FIGUREHEAD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


If he did not espouse those poisoned policies then the party would find another leader who WOULD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


It is the ENTIRE LIE-beral party we need to eliminate from pubic life!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



CONSIDER the RACIST MESS LIE-berals are making of our schools:



Here is an article illustrating just how LIE-berals spread their pernicious propaganda. With some comments of my own in brackets):

As universities 'Indigenize,' some see a threat to open inquiry

From Postmedia News. Published: May 26, 2018. Updated: May 26, 2018 5:05 PM EDT

Filed Under: Toronto SUN/ News/ Canada

The University of Manitoba in 2011 was the first school to issue a formal apology for past treatment of Indigenous people. "Our institution failed to recognize or challenge the forced assimilation of Aboriginal peoples and the subsequent loss of their language, culture and traditions," university president David Barnard said at the time. "That was a grave mistake. It is our responsibility. We are sorry."Brian Donogh / Winnipeg Sun

(An apology is one thing- but the total surrender of LIE-berals to native anti white bigots is another!)

On paper, Mount Saint Vincent University professor Martha Walls seems perfectly suited to teach a course called Selected Topics in North American History: Residential Schools. An expert on First Nations history, colonialism and gender, she has crafted a curriculum giving priority to Indigenous narratives and primary sources.

But according to her critics, Walls is missing one important qualification: she is not Indigenous. And when news spread that a “settler” would be teaching students at the Halifax university about residential schools next fall it prompted an immediate backlash.

(How odd that bigoted natives claiming to hold the moral high ground would smear those who do not share their “vision”! And yet natives are quite happy to permit TVO to play that documentary “The Bruce” about native fishing rights on Lake Huron- that relies ENTIRELY on old white documents for its facts that support native claims! Native bigots- with their selective anti white bias are like NAZIS- WHO only WANT select facts!)

To Rebecca Thomas, a Mi’kmaq woman and Halifax’s poet laureate, assigning Walls the course perpetuated the notion “that non-Indigenous people have the right and expertise to speak on Indigenous topics.” The proper voice is that of someone with “the lived experience of what it’s like to be a product of these systems within Canada,” she told the Canadian Press. Patricia Doyle-Bedwell, a Mi’kmaq woman and Dalhousie University professor, said the choice of Walls highlights the lack of space for Indigenous professors and “Indigenous knowledge perspectives” in Canadian universities.

(The bigot says that only those with “lived experience” can talk about native topics- so does this mean that once the last residential school kid dies of old age we can NEVER speak of residential schools ever again since there are no more “experts”? And what of native opinions about life before white arrival- NO NATIVE alive today can offer “lived experience” regarding any harm whites may have done so long ago - so should we tell all natives to sit down and shut up since they have NO LIVED EXPERIENCE of that time period?)

(Natives rely on law when it suits them and switch to heavily biased bigotry when that suits as well! Such an approach to history will NOT produce the peace and acceptance that natives claim to be seeking! Nor will this bigoted propaganda produce the GRAVY that natives are really aiming for!)

After Mount Saint Vincent convened a meeting of faculty and senior administrators last week, it decided that Walls could teach the course as planned. The university stressed in a statement that Walls is a “true” ally to Indigenous faculty and is “committed to honest reconciliation.”

(OH yes- shining the light of day on politically BIASED “cockroaches” scuttling through our education system out of sight of the public swiftly persuades them to adopt more conciliatory ways!)

That the fitness of a white academic to teach Aboriginal history became a topic of national debate, however, shows how quickly the climate is changing on Canadian campuses: as they respond to the 2015 Truth and Reconciliation Commission report on residential school abuse, universities are in a race to Indigenize.

(Yes- its all about buying votes so LIE-berals and their allies can keep sucking up govt gravy! Why work when you can gain govt gravy!)

Declarations acknowledging traditional First Nations territory are standard at most schools before meetings and ceremonies. Universities poach relatively scarce Indigenous professors from rival institutions, and some set quotas for hiring Indigenous professors and enrolling Indigenous students. They are rethinking curricula, a few schools introducing mandatory Indigenous-themed courses and others incorporating Indigenous knowledge in existing courses. And questions are getting louder about who is entitled to teach about Indigenous people.

(In other words- LIE-beral bigots are seeking to re-write our history!)

There's much to say in favour of various Indigenization initiatives at the universities, but what worries me is the tendency many of them have to push us toward a culture of celebration

Administrators have embraced the reforms, presented as steps toward correcting historic injustices and making the university welcoming to Indigenous students and academics. Universities Canada, the non-profit organization representing 96 institutions across the country, endorses the “Indigenization of curricula” and promotes “the cohabitation of Western science and Indigenous knowledge on campuses.”

(Sadly- our LIE-beral bigots are treating native Cdns in the same muddled fashion as Yankee LIE-berals are treating black kids! Offering up fawning political support and preferential treatment in the hothouse world of academia does NOTHING to prepare kids for the real world!)

But amid the chorus of well-intentioned reformers, a few academics are sounding alarms about the impact on universities’ commitment to free and open inquiry. Some point to a politicization around Indigenous issues on campus that can be hostile toward critical thinking. Others are troubled to see universities hiring professors and admitting students based on race. And there are concerns that the embrace of Indigenous knowledge undermines a commitment to science.

(Oh yes- our hypocrite LIE-berals talk so often of freedom and equality and then try to implement these values by offering special privileges to select groups!)

“There’s much to say in favour of various Indigenization initiatives at the universities, but what worries me is the tendency many of them have to push us toward a culture of celebration,” said Mark Mercer, a philosophy professor at St. Mary’s University in Halifax and president of the Society for Academic Freedom and Scholarship.

“Good universities have a culture of disputation, a culture of critical inquiry and critical discussion. We interrogate identities. In a culture of celebration, on the other hand, people are to be confirmed and strengthened in their identities. Critical inquiry in such a culture is seen as disrespectful and even harmful.”

(With LIE-berals seeking to enhance that view that critical inquiry should be labeld as Hate Crime to be punished in a LIE-beral Human Rights Kangaroo Court whose main focus is SILENCING any critic of ANY LIE-beral policy!)

The reluctance to criticize is understandable. At the source of the current Indigenization push is a desire to atone for the psychological and physical abuse inflicted on generations of First Nations, Inuit and Métis children who were sent to residential schools to be assimilated into white culture. “Education is what got us into this mess … but education is the key to reconciliation,” Truth and Reconciliation Commission chairman Murray Sinclair told the CBC in 2015.

(And why should we feel bad for Metis- who have always moved back and forth between native and white worlds- adopting what suits them and forgoing the rest?
Metis are not innocent victims- they are cynical exploiters! One has only to read Peter Newman`s books about the fur trade or a DETAILED biography of Sitting Bull to see this is true!)

(Metis happily traded in guns with Sioux warriors in their fights with U. S. armies! Metis could and did bridge cultures- dressed as whites they could buy guns and ammunition; dressed as natives they could sell those guns to Sioux so they could kill whites! Ottawa was concerned by the activities of Metis LONG BEFORE Louis Riel became a household name!)

(As for residential schools- there is no question the system fell into the hands of paedophiles- but we are still wrestling with the issue of how natives are to earn a living! In a world where over 80 percent of all jobs require post secondary education- only 25 percent of natives on reserves bother to graduate from high school- and then wonder why they are unemployed!)

(Sone philosopher once observed: “the quickest way to destroy a man is to pay him to do nothing”! Natives are being destroyed and biased propaganda and LIE-beral hypocrisy will NOT repair this damage!)
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#103
Canada's concession on dairy not enough to seal NAFTA deal, U.S. economists say

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/tops...cid=spartanntp

Quote:

There's been growing calls from both sides of the border for Canada to make concessions on its protected dairy sector in order to finally reach a new North American Free Trade Agreement with the United States.
Many argue that Canada has already made concessions in the sector to secure other trade agreements like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), and the dairy industry is a relatively small part of the economy.
But even if Canada does give in to U.S. President Donald Trump's repeated attacks on the country's tariffs on dairy imports and its supply management system, some economists south of the border say it will not be enough to seal a new trade deal.
"Even Canadian concessions on dairy may not be enough to make the U.S. keep the current dispute resolutions," said Carlos Capistran and Mingzi Yi, economists at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, in a note.
"Our baseline is that Canada will join the U.S.-Mexico agreement, making concessions on dairy, but that it likely will have to make some concession on dispute resolution as well."
The current NAFTA's dispute resolution mechanism, known as Chapter 19, allows companies that feel their products have been impacted by anti-dumping or countervailing duties to request arbitration.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said just last week that the process was needed, because Trump "doesn't always follow the rules."
But U.S. economists argue the dispute resolution is "on the balance."
They think Canada will make concessions on the mechanism to reach a trade deal with the U.S. this month.

Value of Chapter 19

However, there are questions over the value of a trade deal without the key resolution mechanism.
"Without Chapter 19, NAFTA is utterly useless as it would subject Canada and Mexico to the vagaries of the U.S. political system and its courts when determining trade policy actions," said Derek Holt, vice-president at Scotiabank Economics, in a note recently.
"Abandoning Chapter 19 is the Trump administration's way of attempting to gut NAFTA."
Holt adds that Mexico has left it entirely to Canada to stand up for a dispute resolution by agreeing to eliminate it, and only keep some safeguards. Canada has the right to oppose such an agreement, he said.
"Prime Minister Trudeau is right in that no deal — and waiting for more reason in future — is better than permanently signing onto a feature that guts NAFTA," Holt said.

 
Hoid
#104
Scrapping NAFTA is just a political bone Trump is throwing his base.

Just like with Obamacare.

And just like with Obamacare the problem is that they have no replacement.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+1
#105
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Scrapping NAFTA is just a political bone Trump is throwing his base.

Just like with Obamacare.

And just like with Obamacare the problem is that they have no replacement.

And what is Ms. Freeland’s plan ?
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#106
Get the Tariffs off Oranges so her Orange juice doesn't cost taxpayers $17/glass
 
Hoid
#107
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

And what is Ms. Freeland’s plan ?

because she's the one that is tearing up nafta.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#108
Canadian trade negotiators to brief Trudeau in person on NAFTA talks

Quote:

WASHINGTON - Canadian negotiators are travelling to brief Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in person on the state of negotiations with the United States on a deal that would allow Canada to remain in a North American trade bloc.
Canada's envoy — Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland — left a meeting with U.S. Trade Rep. Robert Lighthizer Tuesday night. She said the talks were at a point where discussing them face-to-face with the prime minister "is absolutely essential."
Trudeau and his ministers will hold a caucus retreat in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, to plot their strategy.

The U.S. and Mexico last month reached a preliminary agreement to replace the 24-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement. But those talks excluded Canada, the third NAFTA country.

Anybody actually believe she is actually going to update JT or just wants to get in on the party? Didn't the Libs. have a retreat just a month ago wtf get to work? Lol
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#109
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

because she's the one that is tearing up nafta.

You figure that it's her fault that NAFTA is being torn up? This whole thing came about because Crazy Man convinced the hillbillies in Bugtussle, Pennsyltucky that ALL of their problems stem from "them furriners out thar", rather that their general obsolescence and that a perfectly good trading arrangement has been trashed because of it. We shouldn't be negotiating shit. The lunatic is the only one to blame.
 
Hoid
#110
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

You figure that it's her fault that NAFTA is being torn up? This whole thing came about because Crazy Man convinced the hillbillies in Bugtussle, Pennsyltucky that ALL of their problems stem from "them furriners out thar", rather that their general obsolescence and that a perfectly good trading arrangement has been trashed because of it. We shouldn't be negotiating shit. The lunatic is the only one to blame.

Yes I was being sarcastic.
 
NZDoug
Free Thinker
#111
JT should let Trump win the hand shake squeeze game then Trump will be putty in Its hands...
 
JamesBondo
#112
Trump beat Vince McMahon, he would make short work of Trudeau
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#113
Quote: Originally Posted by JamesBondo View Post

Trump beat Vince McMahon, he would make short work of Trudeau

What? Best two falls out of three?
 
pgs
Free Thinker
#114
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

You figure that it's her fault that NAFTA is being torn up? This whole thing came about because Crazy Man convinced the hillbillies in Bugtussle, Pennsyltucky that ALL of their problems stem from "them furriners out thar", rather that their general obsolescence and that a perfectly good trading arrangement has been trashed because of it. We shouldn't be negotiating shit. The lunatic is the only one to blame.

Are you one of those o so superior Canadians ? And you ate still called George. .
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#115
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Scrapping NAFTA is just a political bone Trump is throwing his base.
Just like with Obamacare.
And just like with Obamacare the problem is that they have no replacement.

And Trudeau wasn't trying to make hay with his posturing and grand standing? That eventually pissed the American negotiators off and led us to where we are today.

Why Canada and Mexico don't see eye to eye on NAFTA dispute settlement

Trump’s Tax Cuts 10 Times Worse For Canada Than NAFTA Cancellation: Report

Quote:

The corporate tax cuts passed last year in the U.S. have been called fiscally irresponsible and even dangerous, but Canada's business leaders seem to be growing increasingly jealous of them — or maybe more accurately, spooked by them.
Numerous top Canadian executives have been arguing recently that Canada stands to lose its competitive advantage as a place to do business, thanks to lower corporate taxes south of the border.
Business leaders are putting pressure on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to respond to the situation, and the latest tool in their arsenal is a new report from consultancy PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), which warns that, unless Canada takes action, the country stands to lose 650,000 jobs over the next 10 years as businesses shift activity to the U.S.
The report, prepared for the Business Council of Canada — a group comprised of top Canadian CEOs — estimated the U.S. tax cuts would reduce Canada's economic output by some $85 billion a year, in effect shrinking our economy by 4.9 per cent.
"The negative impact of U.S. tax reform on Canada's economy could be 10 times greater than the potential fallout from NAFTA termination," the Business Council said in a statement. It cited a Conference Board of Canada study which estimated that, if NAFTA were cancelled, it would cost Canada some 85,000 jobs.
Among many other measures, the U.S. tax reform package lowered the U.S.'s federal corporate tax rate to 21 per cent, from 35 per cent. Taking into account state taxes, the average statutory tax rate for businesses in the U.S. is estimated at 25.7 per cent, lower than Canada's average tax rate of 26.6 per cent.
(In both the U.S. and Canada, tax breaks and loopholes mean that corporations often pay far less in taxes than those rates would suggest.)
"This report underlines the need for the federal government to respond to U.S. tax reform with a comprehensive plan to strengthen Canada's economic competitiveness," said John Manley, the president and CEO of the Business Council of Canada and a former cabinet minister in the Liberal government of Jean Chretien.
"Failing to respond to U.S. tax reform puts Canadian jobs and prosperity at risk at a time when Canada is already wrestling with rising protectionism."
Lower taxes for corporations, higher taxes for the rest of us?
As possible solutions, the PwC report says Canada could cut its corporate tax rate gradually until the average federal/provincial rate sits at around 20 per cent. It also suggests aligning personal income tax brackets with those of the U.S., to reduce the "brain drain" effect of skilled Canadians moving to the U.S. for its lower taxes and higher salaries.
For some middle-income Canadians, that could actually mean higher taxes. For instance, the U.S. income tax rate is 22 per cent for single filers earning between $38,701 and $82,500. In Canada, the rate is 20.5 per cent for those earning between $46,605 and $93,208.
And to offset the cost of the tax cuts, the PwC report suggests gradually increasing the GST and "increas[ing] the personal income tax base.
Finance Minister Bill Morneau says Canada's response to the U.S. changes will be part of his government's fall economic update. He told reporters this week he hasn't ruled out any possibilities, including corporate tax cuts.
But a move to cut tax rates to match the U.S.'s would likely face opposition from critics arguing Canada is engaging in a "race to the bottom" on corporate taxes.
Canada has already shifted a considerable amount of its tax burden away from corporations, through a series of corporate tax cuts between 2000 and 2013. That has resulted in a long-term trend that has seen more and more of the country's tax burden falling on individual tax filers.
While some experts have credited Trump's tax cuts with the surprisingly strong economic performance the U.S. has put in this year, others argue they're fiscally irresponsible in the long run.
Forecasts say the bill will mean an additional $1.7 trillion in debt for the U.S. government between 2018 and 2027, ballooning the public debt to 97 per cent of the U.S.'s economic output by 2027, from around 77 per cent today.
Not much negative impact on Canada yet
The impact of the tax cuts on Canada so far is unclear at this early stage, but some data suggests the loss of competitiveness that business leaders fear hasn't materialized, at least so far.
If businesses are turning their backs on Canada, one place we would expect to see this reflected is in the data on foreign direct investment (FDI) into Canada.
As Bloomberg News noted recently, FDI into Canada has been much stronger so far this year than last, with $26.9 billion so far, compared to $10.96 billion during the same time last year -- though 2017 was a particularly weak year. All the same, FDI is above its long-run average this year.
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But that could change over time, as investors adjust to the new reality.
In a recent speech, CIBC CEO Victor Dodig said he is increasingly hearing from the bank's clients that investment opportunities are better in the U.S.
"That, to me, should be a siren call that that money is here. It will leave," he said, as quoted in the Globe and Mail.


Mexican workers say they are victims of abuse on Canadian farms
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#116
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Are you one of those o so superior Canadians ? And you ate still called George. .

Well, I'm a Canadian. You're ... something else ... Quisling, I believe is the term.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
#117
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Well, I'm a Canadian. You're ... something else ... Quisling, I believe is the term.

Any response to my challenge yet ? Do you have any balls ?
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#118
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Any response to my challenge yet ? Do you have any balls ?

What challenge is that, pigs? I must have missed something or perhaps you missed my response.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
#119
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

What challenge is that, pigs? I must have missed something or perhaps you missed my response.

Check your post 530 in the collusion thread , wimp .
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#120
Mexico Ready For U.S. Free Trade Deal Without Canada

Quote:

Mexico is ready to move ahead with a “bilateral” free trade agreement with the U.S. and without Canada if necessary, the nation’s chief NAFTA negotiator said on Thursday in a tweet.
Although Mexico remains hopeful that the negotiations between Washington and Ottawa will prove successful in keeping the deal a trilateral agreement, Kenneth Smith Ramos, the director of the trade and NAFTA Office at the Embassy of Mexico, said a two-way agreement would still be positive for his country.
“We hope the U.S. and Canada will conclude their bilateral negotiation shortly. If that is not possible we are ready to advance bilaterally with the U.S.,” he wrote on Twitter. “The agreement in principle that we closed with the U.S. is positive for Mexico because it preserves free trade and modernizes our trade agreement in key areas for today's economy.”
Ramos’s comments echo those of Mexican Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo, who said on Wednesday that the Latin American nation needs a deal with the U.S., regardless of Canada’s decision.
"If in the end we see a scenario that we don’t expect nor hope for but can’t be ruled out -- that there’s no agreement between Canada and the U.S. – then Mexico needs to take the next step, advancing on a bilateral deal, if it’s necessary,” the minister said, BNN Bloomberg reported. However, Guajardo also said that Mexico hopes “the trilateral nature is maintained.”
Mexico and the U.S. reached a new trade agreement in late August. At the time, Mexican officials optimistically suggested that further negotiations with Canada could take another week to hammer out the details. But thus far, Washington and Ottawa have failed to come to terms, with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau repeatedly insisting that “no deal is better than a bad deal for Canada.”
During a Wednesday fundraiser, President Donald Trump told attendees that he wants to rename NAFTA to USMC, with “C” standing for Canada, according to The Wall Street Journal. However, the president also said the name could be changed to USM, if Canada doesn’t accept the terms of the treaty.
Previously, Trump made off-the-record comments in an interview with Bloomberg insulting and mocking Canada over the trade negotiations. Although Bloomberg did not report the comments, a source shared the information with The Toronto Star and the president later confirmed he had made the remarks. Among other statements, Trump said that every time a disagreement arises in the negotiations, he shows the Canadians “a picture of a Chevrolet Impala,” which is produced in an Ontario factory.
Despite the slower than hoped for progress, Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland has maintained an optimistic tone. On Wednesday, she told reporters that talks had “absolutely not” stalled, dismissing widespread speculation.
“In negotiations, you do work and resolve the issues that you can at the ministerial level and then you reach points where what is needed is continued technical work,” she said, the CBC reported. “Getting there is going to take goodwill, good faith and flexibility on all sides.”

 

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