Toronto bans plastic bags


mentalfloss
#1
Toronto bans plastic bags

Mayor Rob Ford asked council to get rid of the bylaw that requires stores to charge 5 cents for plastic shopping bags.

Instead, council got rid of plastic shopping bags.

In a major embarrassment for Ford, his effort to kill the fee boomeranged on him in stunning fashion on Wednesday, when council voted 24-20 to prohibit retailers from giving out or selling any plastic shopping bags, “including those advertised as compostable, biodegradable, photodegradable or similar,” as of Jan. 1, 2013.

The vote — on a surprise motion from Councillor David Shiner, a conservative Ford ally — would not have occurred if Ford had not brought the issue to the council floor.
To the consternation of other conservatives, it was imposed without any consultation with major retailers or study by city legal or economic officials.

Ford earned a consolation victory: council also approved his original proposal to eliminate the fee bylaw. That means retailers will be allowed to hand out plastic bags for free between July 1 and Dec. 31 this year. But they will then have to distribute non-plastic bags or no bags at all.

Fort McMurray, Alta.; San Francisco and Seattle, among other U.S. cities; and countries including Italy have already imposed plastic bag bans. Toronto is the first major Canadian city to do so.

Ford appeared upset after the vote, blinking rapidly, though he told reporters he had succeeded in doing “what people wanted” by getting the fee bylaw scrapped. When it was pointed out that he had also inadvertently gotten plastic bags banned, he said council’s decision “doesn’t make any sense.”

“I think we’re gonna get sued. I don’t see how we’re gonna win that. It’s gonna be very difficult. It’s not a smart move by council to ban plastic bags. I don’t think it’s gonna hold up,” Ford said.

The Retail Council of Canada did not respond to a request for comment late Wednesday. A spokesperson for Loblaw said the company already has eight stores across Canada where bags are not offered, including a Real Canadian Superstore in Milton.

“We have good experience in the area of bagless stores,” said the spokesperson, Julija Hunter, in an email. She would not say whether Loblaw would go bag-free or offer paper bags in Toronto.

The Canadian Plastics Industry Association immediately blasted the decision, though executive Marion Axmith said it was too soon to say whether the group would challenge the ban in court.

“We’re pleased that council rescinded the bag fee bylaw because bags are not an environmental problem. We’re shocked, however, that they moved to ban bags, because there will be no winners here. The residents of the city, the environment, the industry, no winners whatsoever. Jobs in the city will be lost, and investment in the city will be lost,” said Axmith, director general of issues.

Shiner, one of Ford’s most loyal allies, said he spontaneously came up with his motion in the middle of Wednesday’s meeting. A Ford opponent, Councillor Anthony Perruzza, had already proposed a ban for 2014; that proposal failed on a 22-22 tie before council approved Shiner’s proposal to begin the ban in 2013.

Shiner (Ward 24, Willowdale) served as Mel Lastman’s budget chief and ran for provincial office in 2007 as a Progressive Conservative. Citing environmental concerns and calling plastic bags “junk,” he told reporters that the ban is “the most progressive move that this council has ever had.”

Shiner dismissed criticism of its sudden imposition, saying it is simply the right thing to do. And he attempted to frame the move in fiscal terms. “Less plastic use equals less plastic in the garbage, less litter in the street, and ultimately less cost to taxpayers,” he told council.

Ford did not campaign on eliminating the bag fee bylaw, which has cut plastic bag use in half. He has said that he was persuaded to pursue the matter by people who have called him to complain about it.

“Has it been a success? Absolutely, it has. But it’s really irritating people,” he told council.
Councillor Gord Perks, a Ford opponent and former environmental activist, said the mayor has only himself to blame for the defeat. He said Ford was “reckless” in asking council to make a decision on the fee without study or consultation.

“He continues to block good governance,” Perks said. “Typical of this mayor — thinking and public policy don’t seem to go together.”

http://metronews.ca/news/toronto/253...-plastic-bags/
Last edited by mentalfloss; Jun 7th, 2012 at 07:17 AM..
 
petros
+1
#2
Good.
 
china
Conservative
#3
The same law was introduced in China on June 1-2004 .But at the same time ,China is the greatest
producer of "MADE TO ORDER" plastic business bags , to businesses all over the world.
China no 1- way to go China !
Last edited by china; Jun 7th, 2012 at 08:32 AM..
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#4
I will go back to paper ... after stockpiling platic bags for the next 6 months for lunch bags and trash bags.
 
china
Conservative
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

I will go back to paper ... after stockpiling platic bags for the next 6 months for lunch bags and trash bags.

the baked goods remain fresher in paper bags.
 
Locutus
+2
#6
Los Angeles wannabees again.
 
mentalfloss
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Locutus View Post

Los Angeles wannabees again.

Blame Ford.
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
+1
#8
Good for the pulp and paper industry.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+2
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Blame Ford.

Did he ban the plastic bags?

I blame Miller for starting this mess.
 
MapleDog
Free Thinker
#10
Its kinda getting annoying the eco movement,first they say recycly,which is what some of us already were doing,then we get things wrapped or packaged in plastic that apparently can't be recycled,there is something wrong with that.
 
mentalfloss
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

Did he ban the plastic bags?

I blame Miller for starting this mess.

If it wasn't for his agenda to scrap the fee, we wouldn't be in this mess now.
 
petros
#12
How is no plastic bags a bad thing?
 
MapleDog
Free Thinker
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

How is no plastic bags a bad thing?

They say the plastic which these bags are made of is unrecyclable.
 
mentalfloss
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

How is no plastic bags a bad thing?

I can see the rationale, but this might be too drastic a measure to take.
 
petros
#15
Going from paper to plastic wasn't very hard. Going back should be pretty easy.
 
Just the Facts
Free Thinker
+1
#16
Quote:

He said Ford was “reckless” in asking council to make a decision on the fee without study or consultation.

lol yeah let's spend millions to study the impact of going back to doing things the way most of the world does, and the way we did too just a few short years ago. Ford embarrassing himself? Sorry coucil, it is thee who embarrasses thyself.

Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

They say the plastic which these bags are made of is unrecyclable.

From the OP:

“including those advertised as compostable, biodegradable, photodegradable or similar,”

So even environmentally friendly bags are banned. How embarrassing for Ford....o wait.....
 
Spade
Free Thinker
#17
Great move!
 
Just the Facts
Free Thinker
#18
Time to study juggling.
 
mentalfloss
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Going from paper to plastic wasn't very hard. Going back should be pretty easy.

They might still sell the hard bags that you can use permanently. Going the paper route seems to be simply shifting the dependency from one resource to another.
 
MapleDog
Free Thinker
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Just the Facts View Post

Time to study juggling.

SH*T i'm screwed,i can't juggle
 
Walter
-1
#21
Stupid nanny state Utopianists. No sense in making life easier for our constituents so let's stick it to Ford. Won't pass the sniff test. They've just created another way for the First Nations to make money. Idjots.
 
mentalfloss
#22
Toronto plastic bag ban: Mayor Rob Ford says ‘it’s the people’s fault’

Mayor Rob Ford took to talk radio Thursday morning to lambaste council for banning plastic shopping bags — and, unprompted, blamed the city's residents for the unexpected decision.

“It’s the people’s fault,” Ford told NewsTalk 1010’s John Oakley. “Honestly, sometimes I get so frustrated because the people are just sitting back listening. They don’t pick up the phone, they don’t go down to City Hall, they don’t ask questions, they just — it’s frustrating. I want people to get engaged in municipal politics to find out who their councillor is and know how they vote.”


“If there was a couple hundred thousand people down in Nathan Phillips Square saying they want plastic bags back, yes, then the councillors will listen,” Ford said. “But if people don’t, like I said, take action and don’t get in the councillors’ faces, it’s not going to happen. It’s up to the taxpayers. They have to be more engaged and they’re just not. It’s frustrating when stuff like this happens.”

Moved to action by residents' phone calls, Ford asked council Wednesday to scrap the bylaw that forced retailers to charge five cents for plastic shopping bags. Council did so, but it also voted 24-20 to scrap the bags entirely as of Jan. 1.

Stores will then have to provide paper bags, which cost more to produce, or go bag-free, as eight Loblaw stores in Canada have.

“This is ludicrous. It’s the dumbest thing council has done, and council’s done some dumb things, let me tell you,” Ford told Oakley.

The vote would not have come about had Ford not pushed the issue to council. On Oakley’s show, Ford accepted no blame. He referred to the councillors who voted for the ban as “NDPers” and “very far left,” though they included centrists and right-leaning allies David Shiner, Gary Crawford, and Peter Milczyn.


As he did after council rejected his transit vision, Ford called for the defeat of council opponents: “The campaign’s already started for the next election. We have to get rid of some of these councillors.” And he suggested he might seek changes to the City of Toronto Act to give himself more power.


In February, when Councillor Doug Ford called for an American-style “strong mayor system” in which the mayor would have a veto over council votes, Rob Ford quickly shot down the idea, saying he was happy with the power he has and joking that his brother “might be spending too much time in Chicago.”

On Thursday, he sounded a different note.

“I only have one vote on council. On issues like this, I think the mayor should have a little more power than one vote. I do represent 3 million people compared to some councillors that represent 60,000. We have to look at changing the act, and then I’d have to see whether I agree with it, because there’s pros and cons,” he said.

http://www.thestar.com/news/article/...people-s-fault
 
Spade
Free Thinker
#23
The governed simply can't be trusted; I'd totally vote for a tirade-loving tyrant today!
 
petros
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

They might still sell the hard bags that you can use permanently. Going the paper route seems to be simply shifting the dependency from one resource to another.

Paper is far easier to recycle. Brown bags and carboard always did have a high recycled content even before 'green" came along.

Quote:

. I want people to get engaged in municipal politics to find out who their councillor is and know how they vote.”

Wade, my City Councillor is a wicked mechanic.
 
MapleDog
Free Thinker
#25
Tips of the day.

"never vote for a lawyer"
 
petros
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by MapleDog View Post

Tips of the day.

"never vote for a lawyer"

Unless he's on retainer!
 
mentalfloss
#27
Hmm.. Well, I guess we'll need review the alternatives and find out what's best.

What is Cali doing again?
 
DurkaDurka
No Party Affiliation
#28
The reusable bags from the LCBO work quite well for just about anything. I have about two dozen of them as the LCBO does not offer plastic bags and the paper ones are awkward to carry on the subway/streetcar etc.
 
mentalfloss
+1
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by DurkaDurka View Post

The reusable bags from the LCBO work quite well for just about anything. I have about two dozen of them as the LCBO does not offer plastic bags and the paper ones are awkward to carry on the subway/streetcar etc.

I was under the impression that this would be the way to go, but it could be that they won't be able to sell reusable bags either if they are plastic.
 
Spade
Free Thinker
#30
Whatever happened to burlap? And the penny?
 

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