Urban Camping Wascana Park Style


Twin_Moose
+1
#121
’60s Scoop sharing circles to guide provincial government’s apology

Quote:

The provincial government is taking a step closer to issuing an apology to '60s Scoop survivors.
In an effort to help inform a meaningful apology, the Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Saskatchewan (SSISS) will facilitate sharing circles over the next two months

"Not only am I asking '60s Scoop survivors to show up and tell their stories and begin that journey together, but also for the average citizen of Saskatchewan to show empathy and understanding. It's been a very traumatic and sad part of Saskatchewan history," SSISS co-chair Robert Doucette said.
"In a lot of instances, we see that it's a really liberating process, where you get something off your shoulders. Where you also see and realize that you're not alone.”
The '60s Scoop refers to a period in Saskatchewan’s history when Indigenous children were removed from their parents and communities by provincial child welfare services.
"I do want to hear an apology, because it will validate how I felt all my life, that myself, and my mother and my family were not wrong. We didn't do anything wrong," Doucette said.
"We're looking forward to formalizing an apology as we had committed to; an apology that is meaningful to those involved. We look forward to doing that at the first opportunity," Premier Scott Moe said.

The following sessions will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. with a pipe ceremony at 7:30 a.m.:
Oct. 13: Senior Citizens Activity Centre, Meadow Lake
Oct. 20: Western Development Museum, North Battleford
Oct. 27: Senator Allen Bird Gym, Saturday, Prince Albert
Nov. 3 and 4: Saskatoon Indian & Métis Friendship Centre, Saskatoon
Nov. 17: Treaty Four Governance Centre, Fort Qu’Appelle
Nov. 24 and 25: Mâmawęyatitân Centre, Regina
There is also the option to submit stories online, if unable to attend a sharing circle.

What are the odds this will be the end of this matter?
 
Decapoda
+3
#122
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

’60s Scoop sharing circles to guide provincial government’s apology

What are the odds this will be the end of this matter?

Are they bringing a cheque for $200 million to "add substance to the apology"?

Funny, first they wanted an apology. ...No problem, Brad Wall back in 2015 said they would get one.

Then the apology had to be on FN land. ...Okay, done.

Then it was delayed by the FN chiefs, in which the chiefs cited "scheduling conflicts". ...The Sask. government patiently waited, with Brad Wall stating "We've reached out to First Nation groups to say 'you make the call, We will do it wherever and whenever."

Then, FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron sent a letter to the Government requesting $200 million in compensation be attached to any apology that may be forthcoming, to "add substance to the apology". ...Brad Wall said "That's not where we started with the apology, the short answer is no, that's not something the government's going to be doing."


This isn't about an apology...the FN chiefs don't want an apology, they want to politicize and hold it over the heads of the Sask. government and people indefinitely. It will never be enough to satisfy them...never.

'People need to heal': FSIN looking to get Sixties Scoop apology before Brad Wall retires

Sask. government should pay $200M in compensation to Sixties Scoop survivors, says FSIN
 
Mowich
+1
#123
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

’60s Scoop sharing circles to guide provincial government’s apology

What are the odds this will be the end of this matter?


One can always hope, TM.............but I wouldn't be putting down any bets.
 
Mowich
+3
#124
Quote: Originally Posted by Decapoda View Post

Are they bringing a cheque for $200 million to "add substance to the apology"?

Funny, first they wanted an apology. ...No problem, Brad Wall back in 2015 said they would get one.

Then the apology had to be on FN land. ...Okay, done.

Then it was delayed by the FN chiefs, in which the chiefs cited "scheduling conflicts". ...The Sask. government patiently waited, with Brad Wall stating "We've reached out to First Nation groups to say 'you make the call, We will do it wherever and whenever."

Then, FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron sent a letter to the Government requesting $200 million in compensation be attached to any apology that may be forthcoming, to "add substance to the apology". ...Brad Wall said "That's not where we started with the apology, the short answer is no, that's not something the government's going to be doing."


This isn't about an apology...the FN chiefs don't want an apology, they want to politicize and hold it over the heads of the Sask. government and people indefinitely. It will never be enough to satisfy them...never.

'People need to heal': FSIN looking to get Sixties Scoop apology before Brad Wall retires

Sask. government should pay $200M in compensation to Sixties Scoop survivors, says FSIN

Maybe someone should do a study to see why it is that natives heal at a slower rate than Canadians of other ethnicities who have suffered various types of severe trauma but still managed to pull their lives back together and get on with them. Added to that is the fact that while natives have entire communities to provide solace and comfort, many survivors of severe trauma might only have their immediate families and a close circle of friends. Many of them have to fight for the resources necessary to aid them in their recovery while on all but the most remote reserves, help is provided in the form of government agencies and funding.


I read article after article about Syrians who were brought to our country to escape the hell of war in which their homelands are embroiled. Some endured years of daily bombings, shootings, rapes, hangings, forced suicides and the murders of babies and children before they were able to flee their captors only to find themselves stuck in a tent city along with millions of other refugees for years before they won their freedom in Canada. Two years later, family after family are taxpaying members of society - many of them have started thriving businesses. When interviewed, the gratitude they express for the opportunity to start a new life here in Canada is overwhelming.

And yes, there are Syrians who have committed crimes. But consider this, in 2016 as February drew to a close, 25,000 of them had been settled in Canada. Twenty-five thousand. I have no idea how all of them are doing now. I do know that those who have embraced our country with both hands are much more in the news than those who didn't.
 
pgs
+1
#125
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Maybe someone should do a study to see why it is that natives heal at a slower rate than Canadians of other ethnicities who have suffered various types of severe trauma but still managed to pull their lives back together and get on with them. Added to that is the fact that while natives have entire communities to provide solace and comfort, many survivors of severe trauma might only have their immediate families and a close circle of friends. Many of them have to fight for the resources necessary to aid them in their recovery while on all but the most remote reserves, help is provided in the form of government agencies and funding.


I read article after article about Syrians who were brought to our country to escape the hell of war in which their homelands are embroiled. Some endured years of daily bombings, shootings, rapes, hangings, forced suicides and the murders of babies and children before they were able to flee their captors only to find themselves stuck in a tent city along with millions of other refugees for years before they won their freedom in Canada. Two years later, family after family are taxpaying members of society - many of them have started thriving businesses. When interviewed, the gratitude they express for the opportunity to start a new life here in Canada is overwhelming.

And yes, there are Syrians who have committed crimes. But consider this, in 2016 as February drew to a close, 25,000 of them had been settled in Canada. Twenty-five thousand. I have no idea how all of them are doing now. I do know that those who have embraced our country with both hands are much more in the news than those who didn't.

Yes but the media certainly down plays any Syrian crime, as the death of a 13 year old girl in a park shows .
 
Mowich
#126
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Yes but the media certainly down plays any Syrian crime, as the death of a 13 year old girl in a park shows .


Which in no way refutes what I wrote.
 
pgs
+1
#127
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Which in no way refutes what I wrote.

No , but it is not all sunshine and lollipops. The sunshine and lollipops is definitely a good thing but let’s notlose sight of the negative affects of the refugee situation . We in Canada have seen a few apparently lone wolf situations where mostly young men of dubious mental capabilities have been radicalized with disastrous results . Funny but for some reason they are never part of the immigration debate .
 
Mowich
#128
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

No , but it is not all sunshine and lollipops. The sunshine and lollipops is definitely a good thing but let’s notlose sight of the negative affects of the refugee situation . We in Canada have seen a few apparently lone wolf situations where mostly young men of dubious mental capabilities have been radicalized with disastrous results . Funny but for some reason they are never part of the immigration debate .


Your 'lone wolf' could come from any one of the many different ethnicities who enter the country every year. As I recall, at least one was a Canadian by birth.
 
Twin_Moose
#129
Sixties Scoop survivors prepare for Sask. premier's apology
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#130
Guilty plea over fireworks triggers discharge

Quote:

REGINA - A man accused of setting off fireworks near a protest camp outside the Saskatchewan legislature has received an absolute discharge.
Brent Holland of Yorkton, Sask., pleaded guilty on Tuesday in a Regina courtroom to one count of mischief for shooting a Roman candle into some trees last August near the camp called Justice for Our Stolen Children
Police said they were not aware of any injuries or damage, but the fireworks resulted in a number of charges against Holland, including arson and assault with a weapon.
A number of charges were withdrawn following the guilty plea.
Crown prosecutor William Jennings says the guilty plea — combined with Holland having abided by conditions to keep the peace, follow a curfew and stay out of Regina — makes the absolute discharge sufficient punishment.
The camp was set up in late February to bring attention to what protesters said was racial injustice and the disproportionate number of Indigenous children apprehended by child-welfare workers.
An absolute discharge means there is a finding of guilt but no conviction is registered.
Jennings said security cameras showed Holland with about nine other people around some vehicles parked near an intersection about 2 a.m. on Aug. 12.
He said the video shows Holland lighting a corner-store firework and pointing it at the tree line about three metres from the sidewalk before the Roman candle went off.
"The shot hit the trees and the foliage, dropping to the ground without causing any damage. And then the group scatters. It doesn’t appear that he was aiming for the camp at all," said Jennings.
He said the video did not show any altercation between Holland and the protesters, nor did the group appear to be paying attention to the camp.
Holland spoke to the court through his lawyer.
"Basically characterizing his actions as being a stupid, stupid mistake. He’s very remorseful, very embarrassed," said Jennings.

 
Twin_Moose
+3
#131
Saskatchewan trespass law changes divisive: NDP

Quote:

REGINA - An Opposition member is accusing the Saskatchewan government of playing wedge politics and excluding Indigenous voices with its proposed changes to the province's trespass laws.
Buckley Belanger, the NDP member for the northern constituency of Athabasca, made the remarks in the legislature Wednesday during a debate about the Trespass to Property Amendment Act.
Introduced last November, the legislation would require people to get permission before going on private land, reversing the onus from landowners having to indicate if they do not want visitors.
Although many rural residents and community leaders support the change, Belanger said the bill is divisive and called it a politically motivated move to "simply appease a small minority."
He accused the government of not consulting or listening to Indigenous leaders and hunters.
"If I continue seeing that kind of politics coming out of the Saskatchewan Party, then you begin to question your role as an Indigenous person in this assembly," said Belanger, who is Metis.
"When do we begin to count? When does our opinion matter?"
He said the government should be putting forward legislation that is inclusive and addresses the root causes of crime.
The proposed changes were introduced more than two years after Colten Boushie, a 22-year-old Indigenous man, was killed on a farm in rural Saskatchewan.
A jury acquitted farmer Gerald Stanley of second-degree murder after he testified his gun went off accidentally when he was trying to scare off some young people who drove onto his property.
Belanger called the legislation an affront to democracy and talked about his father, a Metis man from northern Saskatchewan who served in the Second World War.
"That's not what my father envisioned when he served this country," he said.
"That's not what I envisioned when I became part of the provincial legislative assembly."
Justice Minister Don Morgan said he does not believe the bill is divisive and expressed disappointment at Belanger's remarks.
He said the amendments bring Saskatchewan in line with Alberta and other provinces and balances the rights of property owners and the public.
"Essentially it says you don't need to post your land anymore to maintain your property rights."
Morgan said First Nation treaty rights would be respected and he has spoken with the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations, which represents 74 First Nations in the province.
"The goal of this is to prevent people from walking around on other people's land carrying firearms," he said.
While some Indigenous leaders have expressed concerns that the proposed changes could lead to confrontations with landowners, Morgan said he believes otherwise.
"If someone obtains consent before they go on the land we're far less likely to have an incident."

Not sure what the NDP are up to here, this is a good thing taking the onus off the land owner and putting it where it belongs with the visitor of the land. Liability shifts as well IMO from land owner responsible for your safety to you are responsible for your own safety.
 
Mowich
+3
#132
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Saskatchewan trespass law changes divisive: NDP



Not sure what the NDP are up to here, this is a good thing taking the onus off the land owner and putting it where it belongs with the visitor of the land. Liability shifts as well IMO from land owner responsible for your safety to you are responsible for your own safety.


There is absolutely no reason for anyone - natives included - to be trespassing on private land. This is a good law and all must abide by it.
 
Twin_Moose
+3
#133
Suggested in the article it was done by the racists, I hope they report who actually done the crime to confirm if it was done indeed by racists

Teepees at First Nations University vandalized
 
Ron in Regina
+3
#134
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

“We manage risk. Our goal is the safety of every person in this
community — and not doing something that we think would
jeopardize that. We think there is optimism for resolution.”

That was Regina police Chief Evan Bray, explaining why RPS
will not end an occupation of Wascana Park by activists despite
four requests to act by the Provincial Capital Commission.

From the operatic sentiment 150 years ago, that “a policeman’s
lot is not a happy one,” no one ever said that policing is easy.
Like a good referee, cops need to know when to look the other
way and when to enforce the law without favour, preference or
prejudice.

Chief Bray’s explanation is understandable, but incorrect in
refusing to eject Indigenous protesters from Saskatchewan’s
most famous park surrounding the Legislature. While sources
at Regina police headquarters say that the Wascana issue
is just some bylaw ,” the chief knows that modern policing has
undergone significant changes that make it a hybrid of social
work and political gymnastics, lest a cop ever offend a growing
list of entitled and noisy activists.

The earliest principles of policing, from Sir Robert Peel in the
1820s, still resonate today: policing’s purpose is to prevent
crime and maintain order; its goal is to achieve voluntary
compliance with the law in the community. And, according to
Peel, the police must be unwavering in their duties and
adherence to the law, maintaining impartiality and not being
swayed by public opinion. Peel first coined the creed
serve and protect.” .........

Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

From: SP Gormley: Regina police owe better explanation on non-policing | Saskatoon StarPhoenix

(Now Versus)
From: http://globalnews.ca/news/5203590/fs...g-allegations/

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) won’t sign a relationship-affirming pact with Saskatchewan RCMP after Mounties failed to properly investigate a trespassing complaint, according to the FSIN’s chief.

Chief Bobby Cameron said the lack of police response to an evicted farmer entering Ochapowace First Nation lands this month is an example of First Nations being disrespected.

“[First Nations] laws and bylaws are not being fulfilled as they should be,” Cameron said.

The memorandum of understanding between the FSIN and RCMP was to be signed sometime this year, according to the FSIN chief. The agreement would include themes of communication and relationship building, he said.

“Right now, we’re not going to sign it because we’re not satisfied with the outcomes of certain RCMP detachments,” Cameron said.

According to the FSIN and Ochapowace leadership, a non-Indigenous farmer evicted from the reserve for unpaid rent was seen there last week.

Ochapowace Chief Margaret Bear said the man’s son was trying to harvest crops on the land, and when staff approached his truck, a gun was visible in the vehicle. Staff from the community called RCMP, but officers didn’t immediately respond.

But.....But Bobby...it's laws and bylaws....and you know about the "Just Some Bylaw" precedent set with the Wascana Park Protest right? I think I recall your name in there supporting the "it's just some bylaw" position taken by the Regina Chief of Police on this situation? I'm assuming the RCMP responded or will respond in less than 223 days?

Either BOTH positions by law enforcement are right, or BOTH positions by law enforcement or wrong. Pick one position and stand by it. You can't have your cake and eat it too.
 
Ron in Regina
+2
#135
A Law Enforcement responce from the RCMP here:

On Thursday, the service said it is committed to working with the FSIN and “all Indigenous people in Saskatchewan regardless of the status or existence of MOUs.

“We will continue to work hard to strengthen our relationships with all the communities we serve with the end goal of safer communities for all Saskatchewan residents,” the statement said.

An earlier RCMP statement said the police agency didn’t follow all required investigative steps.

“As a result of our review, we will be providing guidance to all our officers in an effort to prevent this from happening in the future. We have advised the FSIN of the results of our preliminary review and the steps we will be taking to reduce the likelihood of this happening again,” the RCMP stated.

In an interview with 650 CKOM, area farmer Richard Cunday said he’s been renting multiple parcels of land from Ochapowace First Nation for roughly 35 years.

Cunday acknowledged he owed the First Nation a $24,000 rent payment dating back to 2018.

The farmer said when he went to pay the balance in late March, he was told the land had already been leased out to another person. However, he still had soybeans to be harvested on the land.

“We said ‘well, we can’t pay the final rent payment for 2018 without confirmation that we can harvest the beans,’” Cunday said, adding the First Nation offered him “no guarantees.”

Cunday said provincial law allowed him to be on the land until mid-May to complete harvest. The new renters, he said, gave him permission to finish the work.

Owen Cunday, Richard’s son, said he approached the Ochapowace staff members’ vehicle last week, not the other way around. He stated his gun was visible, but 50 feet away.

Ochapowace First Nation is roughly 160 kilometres east of Regina.


 
Ron in Regina
+3
#136
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

‘I am really upset:’ Video shows Trudeau meeting with Saskatchewan chiefs

LINK: https://www.cjme.com/2018/09/17/i-am...chewan-chiefs/

SASKATOON — A video posted online shows Prime Minister
Justin Trudeau telling chiefs he is upset about how time was
managed in a recent meeting with the Federation of Sovereign
Indigenous Nations.

Trudeau met with the Saskatchewan chiefs when he was in
Saskatoon for the Liberal Party’s annual caucus retreat last
week.

In the video which is around four minutes long, Trudeau says
the plan was to meet with about eight people for an hour-long
meeting. But many other people showed up and there wasn’t
time for everyone to speak.
Trudeau told FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron — “I am really, really upset” — and said the meeting is not in the spirit of reconciliation.
The Prime Minister’s Office says in a statement that Trudeau was
unable to get through all the issues put forward in the meeting but
looks forward to connecting with First Nations leaders in
Saskatchewan in the future.

The FSIN says they are aware of the video and are preparing a
response.

Justin, tell them "Forthwith!" Forthwith I tell's ya!!!

Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

According to the FSIN and Ochapowace leadership, a non-Indigenous farmer evicted from the reserve for unpaid rent was seen there last week.

Ochapowace Chief Margaret Bear said the man’s son was trying to harvest crops on the land, and when staff approached his truck, a gun was visible in the vehicle. Staff from the community called RCMP, but officers didn’t immediately respond.

But.....But Bobby...it's laws and bylaws....and you know about the "Just Some Bylaw" precedent set with the Wascana Park Protest right? I think I recall your name in there supporting the "it's just some bylaw" position taken by the Regina Chief of Police on this situation? I'm assuming the RCMP responded or will respond in less than 223 days?

Either BOTH positions by law enforcement are right, or BOTH positions by law enforcement or wrong. Pick one position and stand by it. You can't have your cake and eat it too.


Pick one stance.
 
Ron in Regina
+2
#137
Here's a short Video Clip in the LINK from " Bylaw Bobby! "
http://leaderpost.com/news/local-new...ourtroom-today
 
petros
+3
#138
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

'An agreement was struck to allow 48 hours for the sacred fire to burn out and the teepee to be removed.'

Holy shit..........that must have been one helluva a huge campfire.

They were burning sacred oak pallets. It would take 48 hours for the massive pile of sacred nails to cool off.
 

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