Nurses report being exhausted


taxslave
#61
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

Depends on what you mean by nurses.
In NB, LPN's cannot be legally thought of as 'nurses' on the same scale as RN's are. In other places in Canada, from what I understand, they are considered nurses but NB hasn't made that shift yet, and likely won't due to issues that'd come up with it with the RN association and the government.
That said...
In our hospital, RN's and LPN's can do nearly the same jobs with a few limited differences - mostly admin type differences.
PCW's do a lot of the 'scut work' that LPN's used to do.
In the end, there's still not enough staff to cover for all the shifts, and it's not just in nursing. Even security is seriously lacking and IMO they are not paid enough to make up for the shyte they end up dealing with.

I know people in hospital security here and they say the same thing. Not sure why although money is part of it. I know they do some goofy shifts and it seems to take a long time to get permenant status.
 
Cannuck
#62
I know a guy too
 
Serryah
+1
#63
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

As entertaining as Petros' pretend knowledge is, let's deal with reality

https://www.nursinglicensure.org/art...versus-rn.html

In Canada, the course for LPN is two year and you must be registered to practice. If you screw up, you lose your license, just like an RN. There are other differences between there and here that really makes comparing the two countries not reliable.

Quote:

I know people in hospital security here and they say the same thing. Not sure why although money is part of it. I know they do some goofy shifts and it seems to take a long time to get permenant status.


Security here isn't unionized, though it used to be. They make minimum wage unless they do different work. They are also considered, because they're contracted out, as not employee's of the corporation which is both good and bad.
 
petros
+3
#64
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

In Canada, the course for LPN is two year and you must be registered to practice. If you screw up, you lose your license, just like an RN. There are other differences between there and here that really makes comparing the two countries not reliable.

The level of care makes all the difference in distribution of staff.

In SK there are competing Unions. SUN, SEIU, CUPE are 3 off the top of my head and there are more depending on specialty.
Last edited by petros; Apr 14th, 2019 at 10:10 AM..
 
Serryah
#65
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The level of care makes all the difference in distribution of staff.

In SK there are competing Unions. SUN, SEIU, CUPE are 3 off the top of my head and there are more depending on specialty.


Here we have the NBNU for RN's and LPN's are part of CUPE.

I agree that level of care v distribution of staff varies, but that's the problem. Even understaffed, nurses try to provide the best care they can and are being burned out because of it. IMO it's not about who is what, but rather just how many there are period.
 
taxslave
+1
#66
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

Here we have the NBNU for RN's and LPN's are part of CUPE.
I agree that level of care v distribution of staff varies, but that's the problem. Even understaffed, nurses try to provide the best care they can and are being burned out because of it. IMO it's not about who is what, but rather just how many there are period.

To a point. But it also depends on just what the people on shift are allowed to do. The ambulance service has many of the same problems here.
A few weeks ago the ambulance showed up at a potrntial OD with two newbies on board and neither was qualified to administed naloxone. Fortunately our fire dept was also dispatched and all our people are qualified.
 
pgs
+2
#67
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

Here we have the NBNU for RN's and LPN's are part of CUPE.

I agree that level of care v distribution of staff varies, but that's the problem. Even understaffed, nurses try to provide the best care they can and are being burned out because of it. IMO it's not about who is what, but rather just how many there are period.

Of course but how many more can your provinces budget afford ? Should you hire fewer teachers and funnel those funds into nursing ?