April Fools!! Here's your Carbon Tax F#ckers!!!


Ron in Regina
+3
#1
"This isn't an April fool's joke": Scott Moe on carbon tax

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8-_EdLxMyQ

http://www.cjme.com/2019/04/01/saska...kick-in-today/
 
Ron in Regina
+3
#2
"I know you said No!...but...we'll only do you $20/ton the first year. Call it the Carbon Tax Tip...."

"Then once you get use to that (You know you want it!) we'll give it a bit more..."

"Then we'll sit back & bask in the afterglow, and you'll get over it, and you might even get to like it...."
Last edited by Ron in Regina; 3 weeks ago at 06:51 AM..Reason: Pic hosting site folded
 
Ron in Regina
+4
#3  Top Rated Post
Found this in my mailbox a few days back from Ralph Goodale:

"Trust us, our math is sound on this Carbon Tax thing...."

.....and yet, for some reason, I distrust their math. Call me a Carbon Tax Math Denier I guess.
Last edited by Ron in Regina; 3 weeks ago at 06:54 AM..Reason: Pic Hosting Site Folded
 
Danbones
+1
#4
Computer models of global warming proven wrong

SCIENCE | Real temperatures have not increased as much as predicted

Posted 12/14/17, 03:37 pm
In the midst of gloom-and-doom predictions of rapid climate change, a recent study shows computer models grossly overestimate the rate of global warming. The study, published in the Asia-Pacific Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, shows real-world climate change over the past 38 years is 0.096 degrees Celsius, about half of what computer models predict.

In 1994, the same researchers analyzed data for the preceding 15 years and found essentially the same rate of global warming that they found in the new study.

The researchers admitted that even though natural variability may account for some of the discrepancy between predictions and actual global warming, their results suggested that computer models significantly over-estimated actual warming.
https://world.wng.org/content/comput...proven_wrong_0

I wonder why?

if the budget is right, April fools can come on any day of the year.
 
Ron in Regina
+3
#5
LINK: http://www.chroniclejournal.com/news...6c2736f9d.html

WINNIPEG - Manitoba has joined a list of conservative-led provinces challenging the federal government's backstop carbon tax in court.
Premier Brian Pallister says his government will ask a federal court to rule Ottawa has overstepped its bounds.

"Ottawa cannot impose a carbon tax on a province that has a credible greenhouse-gas reduction plan of its own, and we do," Pallister said Wednesday.
He also said Manitoba's court action is separate from those filed earlier in Saskatchewan and Ontario.

"We'll observe other provinces' cases with interest and learn from them, but their cases are not the same as the one we would make."
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Ontario and New Brunswick refused federal instructions to enact their own carbon levies. That prompted Ottawa to impose its own tax, which started Monday.

The initial rate of $20 per tonne, which works out to 4.4 cents on each litre of gasoline and drives up other fuel costs, is to increase every year until it reaches $50 per tonne in 2022.

Saskatchewan challenged the constitutional authority of the federal government to impose the levy in a court case earlier this year. A ruling is expected in the coming weeks.

Ontario's Progressive Conservative government has a court hearing later this month.

Pallister said Manitoba's challenge will be different because the province had planned to bring in a carbon tax of its own, but at a lower $25 per tonne rate that would not rise each year. The premier dropped that plan when the federal government said it was not good enough.

Liberal MP Terry Duguid, who represents Winnipeg South, said Pallister is taking the wrong approach.

"Carbon pollution shouldn't be a partisan issue. If some Conservative politicians choose to not do what's right for our climate and our kids, we will," Duguid said in a written statement provided by the office of Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna.

"Instead of wasting taxpayer dollars in court fighting climate action, we would have hoped to see the premier fight climate change."
Manitoba NDP Opposition Leader Wab Kinew called Pallister's court challenge frivolous.

"We know that a court challenge will do nothing to fight climate change in Manitoba, and our children demand better," Kinew said in the legislature.
Two years ago, Pallister obtained a legal opinion from constitutional expert Bryan Schwartz. It said the federal government generally has the right to impose a carbon tax, but could be rebuffed if a province developed its own plan that would be equally effective in reducing emissions.

Pallister said Manitoba's challenge could take two years or more before it is heard, and may not be necessary if the Saskatchewan or Ontario governments win their cases.

He also pointed to the federal election set for October. Federal Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer has promised to revoke the carbon tax if he becomes prime minister.

Pallister would not say whether he will revive the $25 carbon tax he originally planned if the federal levy is struck down.
"We would not need to do that but, at the same time, I don't want to prejudice the legitimacy of our court case by getting into hypotheticals."

Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick. All Provincial Conservative Governments. All four have had a tax Imposed upon them Federally, but the other provinces and territories haven't had the same tax Imposed upon them Federally, on April Fools Day. Coming court battles regardless of outcome on this Federally selectively tax Imposed provincially to some but not others, will end up in the Supreme Court. Thank God Justin & the Justinites respect the rule of law and are above influencing court decisions with partisan politics or this might have the stink of corruption before it even see's its day in court. (Purple for sacasm)
Last edited by Ron in Regina; Apr 3rd, 2019 at 10:05 PM..Reason: spacing
 
Ron in Regina
+3
#6
Carbon Tax protest just rolled past my house ( well three houses from in front of my house). Took a full hour for them to go by. The radio is saying over 700 trucks in that convoy. Crazy loud and impressive!!!
 
Ron in Regina
+2
#7
This is what rolled past my place before lunch today:
http://www.cjme.com/2019/04/04/convo...-regina-roads/
I've heard that the previous previous world record for a Truck convoy was 590 vehicles in Paris. I've heard that this was over 700 here today. It was impressive!!!










 
Ron in Regina
+4
#8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHdfsy7zATw
GasBuddy analyst weighs in on how carbon tax will affect Canadians at the pumps
 
Mowich
+3
#9
Disappointment in the lack of national coverage for convoy and rally

Aerial photos show massive size of convoy




Weyburn, Regina


– The day after the Regina Rally Against the Carbon Tax, Dennis Mainil was very disappointed with the level of national coverage of the event. Mainil is president of Jerry Mainil Ltd., a Weyburn-based oilfield earthmoving company that was instrumental in the planning of the event. The organizational meetings were held at their offices, and many of the company’s senior staff were key organizers.

Asked why the were so heavily involved, “It’s something the owners and Jerry Mainil Ltd feel, for the betterment of Saskatchewan and all the people in Western Canada and Canada deserve a better deal than what we’re getting. Putting a carbon tax on is not going to solve any problems. You’ve got to create incentives to promote business and energy efficient procedures. The technology that we have in this province has proven to be a leader. We’ve got to continue going that way, and taxing it is prohibitive, going forward.”

“I was very disappointed in with the national coverage,” Mainil said. “It’s very sad, when the only way Saskatchewan can get publicity is when 16 young people are killed in a bus crash a year ago. That goes across the board like wildfire, but we have the biggest convoy in the world, and it doesn’t even hit the radar screen. That ticked me right off.”

“We didn’t get any national coverage. That was pretty sad, I thought. I got home, and my wife was so excited to see this on TV, and there was nothing. It was really bad.”

That wasn’t for lack of media present, however. The press scrum at the end of the rally had the premier surrounded by a semi-circle of tightly packed cameras and microphones, with journalists and camera operators behind them, but it didn’t get much beyond Saskatchewan’s borders. The National Post app had stories like “U.S. federal government in search of experts who can roll and joint,” and “Accountant buys $6 million in Apple iPhones and iPads on company credit cards and nobody notices for five years,” on its main page, but nothing on the convoy and rally.

“You can tell how important we are in Western Canada. Not only do the politicians ignore us, but so does the national media, and it’s pretty disgraceful to be treated like that. Really, we don’t even exist. It’s very frustrating.”

Mainil took his airplane up over Weyburn. While he was flying, Kevin Cooke was shooting photos and video. The lineups in Weyburn, waiting to join the convoy, were nothing short of incredible as seen from the air.

Beyond the convoy, his company how had to figure out now to live with the carbon tax in Saskatchewan, implemented a few days earlier. While Jerry Mainil Ltd. has not yet determined what the impact of the carbon tax will be, they have determined that oil companies don’t want to see it tacked on.

“They aren’t going to pay any more than they are paying on March 31. They won’t pay any more on April 1.”

“The oil companies, flatly, it doesn’t matter what our costs are, they don’t want to pay any more. I don’t want to pay any more to SaskPower. Do I have a choice? Yeah, but then they shut my power off. And if I say to my oilfield customers you’ve got to pay it, they’ll just hire somebody else,” he said.

So at this time, they are likely going to have to eat it.

“Have we got plans? yeah, I’ve got a lot of things going in my head,” he said, noting they’ve talked to other companies about their strategies.

Beyond the dirt moving company, Mainil, like much of his family, also farms. And the farm will also be affected greatly. “When I try to sell my canola, it’s not like I can collect more on my canola because I’ve got to pay carbon tax. Viterra, Richardson, nobody’s going to pay me more for my canola because there’s a carbon tax. There again, the farmer is going to eat it, too.

“Our costs are going up in many ways. Every bag of seed that comes in, maybe, as a farmer, there’s exemptions we’re up for, but all the product delivered to us, he’s not exempt,” Mainil said.

“I don’t mind investing if there’s value. But there’s no value. It’s just a tax.”

That tax will also double in two years. “It’s scary now, it’ll be really scary, going forward. It’s going to kill our economy. It’s going to ruin our economy, and it’s going to take the entrepreneurial ship out of it. Our country is already being killed by bureaucracy. No one wants to invest in Canada. If I’m a billionaire sitting in China, and I can invest in the United States, which has got a really hot economy now, or Canada, where they don’t want pipelines, that’s an easy no-brainer. I’m going to take my billion dollars and invest it where I can make money,” Mainil said.


www.newsoptimist.ca/disappointment-in-the-lack-of-national-coverage-for-convoy-and-rally-1.23782952

 
Ron in Regina
+2
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Disappointment in the lack of national coverage for convoy and rally

Aerial photos show massive size of convoy



Weyburn, Regina
......

“I was very disappointed in with the national coverage,” Mainil said. “It’s very sad, when the only way Saskatchewan can get publicity is when 16 young people are killed in a bus crash a year ago. That goes across the board like wildfire, but we have the biggest convoy in the world , and it doesn’t even hit the radar screen. That ticked me right off.”

“We didn’t get any national coverage. That was pretty sad, I thought. I got home, and my wife was so excited to see this on TV, and there was nothing. It was really bad.”

That wasn’t for lack of media present, however. The press scrum at the end of the rally had the premier surrounded by a semi-circle of tightly packed cameras and microphones, with journalists and camera operators behind them, but it didn’t get much beyond Saskatchewan’s borders. The National Post app had stories like “U.S. federal government in search of experts who can roll and joint,” and “Accountant buys $6 million in Apple iPhones and iPads on company credit cards and nobody notices for five years,” on its main page, but nothing on the convoy and rally.

“You can tell how important we are in Western Canada. Not only do the politicians ignore us, but so does the national media, and it’s pretty disgraceful to be treated like that. Really, we don’t even exist. It’s very frustrating.” ......

.....That tax will also double in two years. “It’s scary now, it’ll be really scary, going forward. It’s going to kill our economy. It’s going to ruin our economy, and it’s going to take the entrepreneurial ship out of it. Our country is already being killed by bureaucracy. No one wants to invest in Canada. If I’m a billionaire sitting in China, and I can invest in the United States, which has got a really hot economy now, or Canada, where they don’t want pipelines, that’s an easy no-brainer. I’m going to take my billion dollars and invest it where I can make money,” Mainil said.
www.newsoptimist.ca/disappointment-in-the-lack-of-national-coverage-for-convoy-and-rally-1.23782952


It is interesting, isn't it? How is this a non-story Nationally?
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

Found this in my mailbox a few days back from Ralph Goodale:

"Trust us, our math is sound on this Carbon Tax thing...."

.....and yet, for some reason, I distrust their math. Call me a Carbon Tax Math Denier I guess.

I don't blame you for distrust they already changed there tune and said only 90% is coming back for now

For whatever Goodale did years ago for Reginians to admire him I hope the voters open their eyes and vote the phucker out this year
 
Ron in Regina
+2
#12
$76
+$766
+$152
+$305
=$609 & the Pie Chart Balances Itself. I question the math on the Carbon Tax, and the indirect costs that nobody has factored into this mess yet. I don't see this making Canada more competitive in a Global Market. What percentage of the take of the carbon tax extortion will be eaten up in just administering this fiasco in order for it to be revenue neutral? I picture the math working very much like the gun registry that was suppose to cost 2 million and was over a billion dollars in cost before it was axed....and the gun registry wasn't designed to suck off everyone's wallets but only (in theory) gun owners. This one is much broader.
 
Ron in Regina
+3
#13
http://nationalpost.com/opinion/brad...e-b72041ce89e1

Three years ago, there we were at the COP21 Paris Climate Conference: 383 Canadians strong. Our delegation was larger than almost any other country’s, rivalling even the host country’s delegation. Canada was back. (Canada's delegation was larger than the US, UK, & Australia's combined)

Saskatchewan was there, too, with our three-person contribution to the overall Canadian throng, though we may have been a little out of step.

Just two weeks before Paris, the Alberta government had announced its own carbon tax. The explicit and implied promise was that this indulgence paid by Albertans would purchase the absolution required to secure pipeline approvals. Saskatchewan then was alone in its opposition to a nationally imposed carbon tax. So, in Paris we were — without intention — a few prairie skunks at this low-carbon garden party.

There were other things at the conference that bemused. The massive complex that hosted the conference to save the planet from carbon was festooned by 140 very large plastic and acrylic animal silhouettes — created using carbon. The breakout rooms, offices and larger theatres custom-built for the conference were made of pressboard — the kind that takes a lot of carbon-based energy to process. Our delegation from Saskatchewan, believing it important to maintain a sense of humour and self-awareness, dubbed it the Hall of Irony.

A lasting memory for me from Paris was the message from India. Prime Minister Narendra Modi articulated a goal to bring the modernity and transformational economic power of electricity to all of its citizenry. They have committed to utilizing renewable generation in this massive effort, but noted that they would need additional carbon-based generation, even coal.
Interestingly, the only salutary Canadian reference in the advance UN document, presented to set the table at Paris, was Canadian carbon-capture and storage (CCS) capacities and specifically the Boundary Dam 3 cleaner coal project in Estevan, Sask. That plant today is making electricity from burning coal two to three times cleaner than from natural gas. Yet, it was mentioned seldom, if at all, by our federal delegation at Paris.

Consider if Canada’s climate plan was about real reductions in global emissions conveyed by a new focus on reducing the costs of the next-generation technologies like CCS in which we are already international leaders. The federal government at the recent climate change conference in Poland announced $275 million in funding to the World Bank-led Powering Past Coal Alliance. That is close to the exact amount the previous federal government provided to Saskatchewan, enabling our government to proceed with the Boundary Dam 3 project. It is an important point because without that kind of federal partnership, Saskatchewan cannot go it alone to the next generation of the technology at other coal-fired plants. What a lost opportunity.

There are an estimated 1,600 coal plants in various stages of planning and construction around the world. Canada could take a leadership role. The Saskatchewan plant is working but, as with all new technology, the first generation is costly. With a concerted comprehensive effort, those costs could come down in new generations of the application. Canadian technology, in concert with the efforts of the private sector, the provinces and other countries, could clean up hundreds of coal plants being built greenfield and so many more through retrofit.

The recent UN report on climate change wielded by federal ministers as the reason to double down on taxing our 1.7 per cent of emissions specifically noted the importance of CCS if the spirit of Paris is to manifest. Similar commentary has followed the conference in Poland.

In Canada, the discussion about what we can realistically do to help the global challenges has been monopolized by a domestic carbon tax. And those who dare dissent are accused of all manner of heresy. But even if Canada were to achieve Paris targets, the resulting global emissions reductions would be an entirely irrelevant 0.51 per cent or 30 per cent of our current 1.7-per-cent share of global emissions.

At $200 per tonne of carbon dioxide (as the federal documents say the carbon tax must be to hit Paris targets) or even the $50 that the feds will currently admit to as their plan, the carbon tax will be much more efficient at dulling our competitiveness and costing us investment in our trade-exposed industries than in reducing our own small portion of global emissions, much less the planet’s.

Let’s have a Canadian plan that will be global in scale and truly contributes to efforts to reduce worldwide emissions.

Let’s also end the practice of accusing those who favour a greater Canadian focus on technological solutions that could meaningfully reduce global emissions as opposed to a Canadian carbon tax aimed at reducing global remissions by half of one per cent as being unserious about the challenge.
 
petros
+2
#14
Actual CO2 reduction but not a peep from the Feds but a tax is the solution?

Sounds like Bullshevik to me.
 
Ron in Regina
+1
#15


http://www.cjme.com/2019/11/12/parli...tion-on-dec-5/

OTTAWA — Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer and Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe’s back-to-back meetings with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Tuesday yielded little by way of results in the seemingly elusive search for national unity in the wake of a divisive federal election.

With the House of Commons now scheduled to return on Dec. 5, Scheer lobbed the ball into Trudeau’s court for ensuring the throne speech attracts enough support to keep the government standing, while Moe suggested it appears time for his province to find a way to play the game on its own.

Moe said he arrived in Ottawa in good faith to hear how Trudeau planned to make good on a promise he made on election night: that he understood and would address the frustrations of voters in Alberta and Saskatchewan who elected not a single Liberal MP between them on Oct. 21.



I came today to hear about what he was going to do differently to support the industries and the people in our province and I can tell you this — I did not hear that there is going to be anything different, there is going to be more of the same,” a visibly upset Moe told reporters after the meeting.

Before it began, Trudeau had suggested it was going to be a tough discussion, noting there are many areas in which the two do not agree.

“There are a number of things we’re going to be able to work together on,” he said, however. “We both understand our shared responsibility to do things that strengthen the country every step of the way.”

Moe walked into the meeting with a set of demands he’d been articulating since the Liberals won a minority government: a one-year pause on the federal carbon tax in Saskatchewan, a reworked equalization formula and more overseas oil markets opened by completing pipelines beyond the Trans Mountain project.

He got commitments for none of these, Moe said, and it’s time for his province to find another path forward.

The prime minister needs to answer the question as to how is he going to ensure that he not only understands the frustrations in the province of Saskatchewan but how he is going to support them,” Moe said.

Saskatchewan will continue its court challenge to the federal carbon tax and increase outreach to global trading partners, Moe said.

We are also going to look at opportunities to expand our provincial autonomy,” he said, promising to expand on that in the coming days. “Our provincial government will not abandon the people of our province.”

Scheer, who also represents a Saskatchewan riding, left his own meeting with Trudeau with a slightly more optimistic tone. After their conversation, which lasted less than 30 minutes, he suggested he and Trudeau see eye-to-eye on subjects both parties made promises on during the campaign: making maternal and parental benefits tax-free, funding public transit in Toronto, and other tax cuts. Trudeau has long said his first move in the new Parliament will be to introduce tax cuts.

Scheer said he’ll wait to see whether that agreement is reflected in the throne speech. A Commons vote to approve it as a general plan for governing is considered a measure of confidence. With a minority government, the opposition parties could easily trigger an election by voting to reject it.

It’s up to Mr. Trudeau to find common ground to get his throne speech passed,” Scheer told reporters.

“I highlighted the areas we would be focusing on, the parts of our platform that we believe should be implemented, and it’s up to him to decide what to do with that.”

Trudeau said voters expect MPs to get to work quickly.

“Last month, Canadians elected a Parliament that they expect to work together and that’s exactly what I’m going to be focusing on doing,” Trudeau said.

Trudeau is also expected to meet the leaders of the other opposition parties in the coming days. With his Liberals holding only 157 seats, he will need backing from at least one of the Conservatives, the Bloc Quebecois or the New Democrats to move any legislation ahead in the next session of Parliament.

Scheer, whose Conservatives won 121 seats last month, could also band together with the other parties to defeat Trudeau and force an election. Scheer said he’s not scheduled any meetings with the other leaders so far.
 
petros
#16
Trudeau sealed his fate with SK and the West.

He's toast. Liberals will be looking for a new leader.
 
Mowich
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

http://nationalpost.com/opinion/brad...e-b72041ce89e1

Three years ago, there we were at the COP21 Paris Climate Conference: 383 Canadians strong. Our delegation was larger than almost any other country’s, rivalling even the host country’s delegation. Canada was back. (Canada's delegation was larger than the US, UK, & Australia's combined)

Saskatchewan was there, too, with our three-person contribution to the overall Canadian throng, though we may have been a little out of step.

Just two weeks before Paris, the Alberta government had announced its own carbon tax. The explicit and implied promise was that this indulgence paid by Albertans would purchase the absolution required to secure pipeline approvals. Saskatchewan then was alone in its opposition to a nationally imposed carbon tax. So, in Paris we were — without intention — a few prairie skunks at this low-carbon garden party.

There were other things at the conference that bemused. The massive complex that hosted the conference to save the planet from carbon was festooned by 140 very large plastic and acrylic animal silhouettes — created using carbon. The breakout rooms, offices and larger theatres custom-built for the conference were made of pressboard — the kind that takes a lot of carbon-based energy to process. Our delegation from Saskatchewan, believing it important to maintain a sense of humour and self-awareness, dubbed it the Hall of Irony.

A lasting memory for me from Paris was the message from India. Prime Minister Narendra Modi articulated a goal to bring the modernity and transformational economic power of electricity to all of its citizenry. They have committed to utilizing renewable generation in this massive effort, but noted that they would need additional carbon-based generation, even coal.
Interestingly, the only salutary Canadian reference in the advance UN document, presented to set the table at Paris, was Canadian carbon-capture and storage (CCS) capacities and specifically the Boundary Dam 3 cleaner coal project in Estevan, Sask. That plant today is making electricity from burning coal two to three times cleaner than from natural gas. Yet, it was mentioned seldom, if at all, by our federal delegation at Paris.

Consider if Canada’s climate plan was about real reductions in global emissions conveyed by a new focus on reducing the costs of the next-generation technologies like CCS in which we are already international leaders. The federal government at the recent climate change conference in Poland announced $275 million in funding to the World Bank-led Powering Past Coal Alliance. That is close to the exact amount the previous federal government provided to Saskatchewan, enabling our government to proceed with the Boundary Dam 3 project. It is an important point because without that kind of federal partnership, Saskatchewan cannot go it alone to the next generation of the technology at other coal-fired plants. What a lost opportunity.

There are an estimated 1,600 coal plants in various stages of planning and construction around the world. Canada could take a leadership role. The Saskatchewan plant is working but, as with all new technology, the first generation is costly. With a concerted comprehensive effort, those costs could come down in new generations of the application. Canadian technology, in concert with the efforts of the private sector, the provinces and other countries, could clean up hundreds of coal plants being built greenfield and so many more through retrofit.

The recent UN report on climate change wielded by federal ministers as the reason to double down on taxing our 1.7 per cent of emissions specifically noted the importance of CCS if the spirit of Paris is to manifest. Similar commentary has followed the conference in Poland.

In Canada, the discussion about what we can realistically do to help the global challenges has been monopolized by a domestic carbon tax. And those who dare dissent are accused of all manner of heresy. But even if Canada were to achieve Paris targets, the resulting global emissions reductions would be an entirely irrelevant 0.51 per cent or 30 per cent of our current 1.7-per-cent share of global emissions.

At $200 per tonne of carbon dioxide (as the federal documents say the carbon tax must be to hit Paris targets) or even the $50 that the feds will currently admit to as their plan, the carbon tax will be much more efficient at dulling our competitiveness and costing us investment in our trade-exposed industries than in reducing our own small portion of global emissions, much less the planet’s.

Let’s have a Canadian plan that will be global in scale and truly contributes to efforts to reduce worldwide emissions.

Let’s also end the practice of accusing those who favour a greater Canadian focus on technological solutions that could meaningfully reduce global emissions as opposed to a Canadian carbon tax aimed at reducing global remissions by half of one per cent as being unserious about the challenge.

 
Mowich
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Trudeau sealed his fate with SK and the West.

He's toast. Liberals will be looking for a new leader.


Considering that the Liberal power base resides almost entirely in the East and that Pinocchio did well back there, they may decide to keep him around, pete. I would not be surprised to learn that the party's big pockets took him aside for a wee chat after his catastrophic loss of a million+ votes and told him to get with the program and stop being such a tool.
 

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