the government's relationship with Inuit was one of double standards


MHz
+1
#1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjjCqGxgn5U&t=169s
HIGHLIGHTS: Justin Trudeau faces the media during trip to Canada's north



0:45 Tuberculosis outbreak

1:15 Water advisories, opening new schools, health care and health centers, language protection, family services, . . .

1:50 The little smirk shows nothing has been done in the past to erase the flaws. Leaks in that area will damage both parties as well as the World banks as they are the ones creating the flaws in the system and prevent long-term solutions. Can you say 'intentional torture'??
2:00 Timeline.


The water and (most) health issues can be fixed in one year. School and language issues starts with a computer and smart phones in ever home in every village along with 'broad-band' access.


Discuss . . .
 
MHz
#2
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north...luit-1.5047805
Trudeau apologizes for 'colonial,' 'purposeful' mistreatment of Inuit with tuberculosis
Also announces launch of Nanilavut initiative, database will help Inuit find relatives' gravesites

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau today apologized in Iqaluit for the federal policy on tuberculosis in the mid-20th century, calling it "colonial" and "purposeful," and saying the government knew it was taking a toll on Inuit.
"For too long, the government's relationship with Inuit was one of double standards, and of unfair, unequal treatment," he said.
"Canada must carry that guilt and that shame."
His speech in Iqaluit on Friday morning began by recognizing the various injustices Inuit were facing at the same time as the tuberculosis epidemic.

These included the government identifying Inuit with numbers — on leather identification tags — instead of by their names, punishing children for speaking their Inuit languages, having their sled dogs teams killed by officials, and moving them away from their homes to assert Canadian sovereignty.

"Because of all this — the forced relocation, the residential schools, the TB policy — it happened at the same time, to the same people within just a few decades," Trudeau said.
Representatives from the four Inuit regions of Canada that stretch across the Arctic to Labrador have been in Iqaluit for much of the week to hear the apology from the prime minister.The racism and discrimination that Inuit faced, was, and always will be, unacceptable.
- Justin Trudeau, PM
Inuit were separated from their family members and taken to Southern Canada for tuberculosis treatment from the 1940s through the '60s. Many patients lived in sanatoriums for years, and their families often weren't told about their whereabouts or conditions, even when they died.
(in part)

Hey Pete, how many Indians will be found in the mass graves around your beloved insane asylum in Sask??
https://taholtorf.wordpress.com/2009...tal-hospitals/
Called the Saskatchewan Hospital, this is a mental hospital that back in the early 1900’s was totally self sufficent. All staff and patients lived and died on the grounds. This building was the first mental facility in the province.
Being the location is on the edge of northern forest, the hospital’s backdrop looks onto a wonderful area of the province. Which over the years has become incredibly haunted.
By 1929, with approximately 1,000 patients in each institution, the overcrowding became deplorable. Patients were deteriorated and unclean. The only clothing they wore were strong dresses made of canvas. They slept on beds sometimes two to a bed, sometimes the odd one under a bed.
There is an old cemetery hidden away in over grown brush that on many nights lights and sounds are seen and heard. Whispers can be heard from behind the gravestones but when you look behind the stone nobody is there.
There was also a wing of the hospital that burned down in the early 1930’s and one of the patients was badly burned in the fire. She died a few days later and her ghost can be seen wandering the burned out wing at night.
The hospital is also connected to all the buildings on the grounds via underground tunnels that many staff have mentioned passing by people in these tunnels who simply vanish once you pass them.
It’s been said that those who go to the hospital are left with chills running up and down their spine. Especially at night. You never know who may be watching you!

The third hospital in Saskatchewan we’ll take a look at is in Weyburn. Weyburn rests on the banks of the Souris River in south eastern Saskatchewan.
The building is the second oldest mental institution in Saskatchewan. Opened in 1921, it was, at the time, the largest building in the British Empire. It’s construction was directly affected by overcrowding in the hospital in North Battleford.
During the 1930’s an investigation into patient care took place. What was discovered was the practices used by the doctors were inhumane and cruel. However, the mental institution remained open.
When the facility first opened, mental illness was poorly understood and the primary methods of treatment consisted of ‘work and water.’ A lot of them worked at the laundry and in the kitchen and in the gardens. They were just glad to have things to do.
One of the favored treatments of the 1860’s was the Water Cure, in which a patient would be immersed naked into a tub of icy water and then taken to a tub of scalding water after their body temperature had sufficiently lowered. In addition, female patients, received a cold water douche, administered with a hose and then they were wrapped tightly in wet sheets to squeeze the blood vessels shut. This was followed by vigorous rubbing to restore circulation. The “treatments” were administered several times each week but not surprisingly, such techniques brought little success and most of the patients never got better.

Other treatments used at the hospital were not so benign. In an attempt to control and treat patients, methods such as insulin therapy, electroshock and lobotomies were practiced.
Although invasive, these methods were driven by a desperate need to help patients who were often a danger to themselves and others. Later, other therapies came into practice.
 
MHz
#3
https://www.cpha.ca/tb-and-aboriginal-people
TB and Aboriginal people

Epidemic tuberculosis (TB) came to Canada with European settlers in the 1700s. Aboriginal people in southeast Canada were probably first exposed to TB over 300 years ago, while those on the west coast were exposed about 200 years ago.

R.C. Indian Residential School Study Time, [Fort] Resolution, N.W.T.
TB was spread to First Nations and Métis on the Prairies about 130 years ago when the Canadian Pacific Railway was built and the reserve system established. The Déné and the Inuit in the north were exposed more recently, in the late 19th and early 20thcenturies.
Malnutrition increased the risk of disease, and the confinement of First Nations people on crowded reserves allowed the disease to spread rapidly. Death rates in the 1930s and 1940s were in excess of 700 deaths per 100,000 persons, among the highest ever reported in a human population.
Tragically, TB death rates among children in residential schools were even worse -- as high as 8,000 deaths per 100,000 children.


Inuit Sent South for Treatment

When tuberculosis epidemics spread among northern Inuit communities in the 1950s and 1960s, thousands were transported to southern hospitals and sanatoria for treatment. (The 2008 Academy Award-nominated Canadian movie, "The Necessities of Life" tells one such story.)
At least one-third of Inuit were infected with TB in the 1950s. From 1950 to 1969, a specially-designed coast guard ship named the C. D. Howe made summer trips to Inuit communities in the eastern Arctic. Once the doctors decided who needed to go south for treatment in hospitals and sanatoria, these patients were not permitted to go ashore to collect belongings or say goodbye to family and friends. Some were never seen again.
In 1956, one-seventh of the entire Inuit population was being treated in southern Canada. The average length of stay was two-and-a-half years and some patients stayed much longer.
Many families were not notified when a TB patient died in the south. The dead were buried in paupers' graves in a southern cemetery, paid for by the Department of Northern Affairs.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north...reak-1.4633882
Canadians must hold government accountable in Nunavut's tuberculosis outbreak

Social Sharing



Dr. Sarah Giles, a family physician, says depth and scale of problem needs more attention

The depth and scale of this problem should leave every Canadian outraged.
Most Canadians think of poor countries when they think about tuberculosis (TB), a disease intimately connected with substandard living conditions.
Last year, 100 people in Nunavut were diagnosed with active TB — a number many Canadians would find shocking.
To put that number in perspective, Nunavut now has the same incidence rate of TB as Somalia, 261 cases per 100,000. The rest of Canada has an incidence rate of only 0.6 cases per 100,000 people.
With rare exceptions, such as when children like 15-year-old Ileen Kooneeliusie of Qikiqtarjuaq, die from the disease, as she did in January 2017, the Canadian media have not reported on the longstanding problem in the North.
Some Canadians may be aware of the March announcement by the federal government and Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK), the national representative organization for Inuit in Canada, which vowed to eliminate tuberculosis in the northern regions of Canada inhabited by Inuit by 2030. The federal government also pledged $27 million to eliminate TB in Inuit communities.
This may not be enough.


Stopping outbreak a 'herculean effort'

The proposed spending comes at the same time that the incidence rate of tuberculosis has hit crisis levels in Nunavut. Stopping the current outbreak will require a herculean effort. Worse yet, the current TB outbreak may be more extensive than we realize because the existing data are poor quality.
Tuberculosis has two forms: active and latent. When people are exposed, they first develop latent TB — a non-infectious form of the disease.The current TB outbreak may be more extensive than we realize.
- Dr. Sarah Giles
Approximately five to 10 per cent of people with latent TB will develop active TB, which makes them sick. While most people think of TB as disease of the lungs, it can be found virtually anywhere in the body, but is only contagious when it is in the lungs.
A government report obtained through an access to information request showed an active TB rate of 1,020 per 100,000 infants — more than one in 100 infants — in Nunavut in 2017.
In the rest of Canada, the rate is just three infants in 100,000.
Though no babies died of tuberculosis in Nunavut in 2017, even successfully treated TB can cause lifelong health consequences, such as cognitive impairment.
Because babies develop active TB quickly; TB in infants indicates high levels of disease circulating in a community.
 
MHz
#4
SNC can get multiple threads and intentional torment of Indians for decades rates not a single fuking word of sympathy from any member of the loco Jewish collective. Typical for a room full of psychopaths. By the time this thread is finished in about 2022 you will be well versed on the kind of shit your group has caused to the Indians even if there are still no tears.


Why wait for Passover like the Jews would have to?
The deconstruction of the lie starts right now. No need to read it I will be quoting it for the next few posts as it goes back to the days of the Black Death in Europe. Respiratory infections are 2 of the top 10 (medical) killers in Canada and the rest of the world. Do you have any idea how much money that brings in for 'Big Pharma' in a year?? Do you know the same ones claiming to not be able to find a permanent cure also run the military bio labs that do nothing but create new and cheaper ways to kill millions if people at a time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_r0n9Dv6XnY
https://www.cbc.ca/news/health/cbc-e...i-tb-1.5046336
newsTuberculosis rate among Inuit is 290 times higher than for non-Indigenous people in Canada. Here's why

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau apologized Friday for the way the Canadian government treated Inuit patients with tuberculosis in the 1940s, '50s and '60s.
In actions reminiscent of the Sixties Scoop, and of the government forcibly sending Indigenous children to residential schools, thousands of Inuit patients were taken from their communities by the government and brought south for treatment.
But many of them died, and no one ever told their families what happened or where they were buried.
Canadians may think of tuberculosis as a disease of the past. But it is still one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide. And it is still a serious disease in this country — especially for people living in the North.

What is tuberculosis?

Tuberculosis, or TB, is a highly infectious and contagious disease caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis that mainly affects the lungs.
According to the Mayo Clinic, symptoms include:
  • Coughing for more than three weeks.
  • Coughing up blood.
  • Chest pain with breathing or coughing.
  • Weight loss.
  • Fatigue.
  • Fever.
  • Night sweats.
  • Chills.
It can also affect the kidneys, spine and brain.
If it is not diagnosed quickly, it can spread more easily and people wind up with much more advanced cases of the disease.
How do you get it?

The bacteria that cause tuberculosis spread from one person to another through droplets released into the air — by coughing, sneezing, laughing, spitting, or even just talking.
According to the Canadian Public Health Association, at the time of Confederation in 1867, tuberculosis was the leading cause of death in the country. There was little that doctors could do other than to house patients in sanatoriums for months of rest.





In actual numbers, there were 1,684 cases diagnosed in all of southern Canada in 2017. There were 112 in the three far less populated territories, including 101 in Nunavut alone.
According to data from PHAC, the average rate of infection in Canada's 10 provinces in 2017 was 4.46 per 100,000 people.
In Nunavut, it was 265.8. Inuit make up about 85 per cent of Nunavut's population, according to PHAC.
The World Health Organization says the rate of infection in the world's poorer nations is between 150 and 400, so Nunavut falls squarely in that range.
Why are people in the North more vulnerable?

There are several factors that contribute to the much higher rates of infection in the North.
"Many Inuit people live in overcrowded homes that are poorly ventilated ... they're very airtight," said Banerji, who has researched respiratory infections in babies in Canada's Arctic for many years. "Also, there is quite a bit of poverty, which can make tuberculosis worse. Malnutrition can exacerbate tuberculosis."
Poor access to health care, or issues of not feeling safe going to an outpost nursing centre or a hospital, can also be factors.
And there is another possible factor Banerji believes needs further study.
She says Inuit babies have the highest rate of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in the world. Banerji says Nunavik, the northernmost region of Quebec, provides the RSV antibody to all babies, but the government of Nunavut does not; it provides the antibody to babies considered high-risk.
She wonders if there is a connection between high RSV rates and TB.
"It's just to say that a lot of respiratory disease is over-represented in Inuit populations," she said. "Babies or people who have scarring or damage to the lungs probably are more susceptible to active tuberculosis."
"Many Inuit people have been impacted by colonialism, some people with residential schools, some people with the Sixties Scoop," Banerji said. "Also, policies that have led to poverty and discrimination as far as employment and funding."
And the treatment takes time, she says. Once you figure out what a patient's TB is resistant to, it often needs to be treated with three or four different antibiotics over a long period of time because it's a slow-growing organism. This can also be harder to do in the North, especially when it involves patients returning to far-away nursing stations or getting the required drugs shipped to remote locations.
What would it take to bring TB rates down in the North?

While Dr. Banerji believes a national strategy for food security and standards for housing would go a long way, there is another important challenge.
"We're trying to get more medical schools to have Indigenous health as part of their curriculum. A lot of physicians and nurse practitioners are becoming more culturally safe. But some of them haven't had a lot of education experience on Indigenous health."
That's started to change in recent years. In Canada, the University of Toronto, McGill, and the universities of Ottawa and Manitoba have made Indigenous health issues part of their students' med school training.




Clarifications

  • A previous version of this story did not reflect the fact that the government of Nunavut administers the RSV antibody to high-risk babies.
    Mar 08, 2019 12:12 PM ET

Corrections

  • A previous version of this story stated that tuberculosis rates in the North were 290 times higher than in the rest of Canada. In fact, that number refers to the rate of infection among Inuit compared to non-Indigenous people born in Canada.
    Mar 08, 2019 12:48 PM ET
  • A previous version of this story incorrectly identified tuberculosis as a virus. It is, in fact, a bacterial infection.
    Mar 08, 2019 5:59 AM ET
 
Blackleaf
+2
#5  Top Rated Post


WHO’S COME UP WITH THAT LITTLE PROBLEM FOR THEM? I’VE NEVER HEARD AN ESKIMO MOAN ABOUT THAT… WHY ARE THEY GONNA BE BOTHERED? SEE, PEOPLE MAKE UP ALL THESE RULES: YOU CAN’T CALL A MIDGET A MIDGET. THEY PREFER DWARF; LEPRECHAUNS DON'T LIKE IT... "

KARL PILKINGTON ON WHY HE CAN’T CALL AN ESKIMO AN ESKIMO
 
Danbones
#6
How about Inuit pies?

On a more serious note:

People are still being kicked out of their gardens by "angels" with flaming swords.



In case one hasn't noticed, there is more than one version of the flaming sword.

One other thing: There is only one time there was a sea split so the people who were headed to the promised land ( to where the food grows upon the water) could cross on the sea bottom that we know of for certain...and that was the Bering straight land bridge. With all due respect for 400 foot sea level rise since then, and the modern end of the world paranoia of "global warming":

I wonder how that will play out for the fire stick/ flaming sword folks on judgement day.
Last edited by Danbones; Mar 9th, 2019 at 07:51 AM..
 
taxslave
+2
#7
trudOWE has become an international embarrassment. Appologizing for something that happened before he was even born is something only a narcisist would do.
 
MHz
#8
The other option is be a psychopath like you and the Jewish doctors that loved having an unlimited supply of human lab-rats. A practice that is still going on today when you do a little digging. Human trafficking, child sex trafficking,

Notice all the 'Government hospitals' in the other links but suddenly Jews are all over Sask except in the 'Sanitariums'.
https://www.cjnews.com/news/health/e...wish-hospitals


http://jahsena.ca/wp-content/uploads...anada-2010.pdf
Small Towns and Farming Colonies Saskatchewan The first Jewish immigrants to Saskatchewan came in the last days of the nin eteenth century. Saskatchewan’s first Jewish resident was Max Goldstein, a Russian - born tailor who opened a store in Fort Qu’Apelle in 1877. He also served as a quartermaster during the second Riel Rebel lion in 1885. In 1901, there were a total of 198 Jews in all of the Northwest Territories. The first settlement was formed near Moosomin, also called New Jerusalem, in 1882. The oldest established Jewish colony was formed near Wapella in 1888. By 1892 there were 20 families. Wapella was followed by the colon y at Hirsch near Estevan in 1892, where the first Synagogue in Saskatchewan was built. It is home to the oldest Jewish cemetery in the Province, and initially hosted 47 families from Russia. The Lipton colony came in 1901, with 40 families, and in 1906, Ed enbridge was founded, then colonies at Sonnenfeld (1906) and Hoffer. In 1926, the Canadian Pacific Railroad finally reached the colony of Sonnenfeld. At the same time, the Jewish Colonization Association purchased an additional 8800 acres of land for res ettlement of more Jews. That colony reached its peak population at the end of the 1920s with 217 people. The Edenbridge Colony (literally, Yidn Bridge, or Jew’s Bridge) was settled by Lithuanian Jews who had lived in South Africa. It peaked at 232 in 1919, but had dropped to 187 by 1931, when it celebrated the twenty - fifth anniversary of the founding of the colony. At that time the community had a synagogue, community hall, two public schools, a young person’s club, a dramatic society, a Yiddish newspaper a nd regular classes in Hebrew, Yiddish and religion. The Edenbridge synagogue and cemetery are still standing, and the ark from the Sonnenfeld colony is now in the Montefiore Synagogue at Heritage Park, Calgary. The small towns of Saskatchewan were also ho me to many Jewish families, who mostly ran the general stores. By the mid - 1920s, there were Jews in Melfort, Kamsack, Yorkton, Melville, Estevan, Weyburn, North Battleford and Moose Jaw. Most of these towns had their own synagogues, Jewish cemeteries, Talm ud Torahs and cultural organizations. One of the largest of these communities was Moose Jaw, whose synagogue, the House of Israel, was completed in 1926 thanks to funds raised from both the Jewish and non - Jewish communities. They also had a long - standing B ’nai Brith lodge. At its peak in 1931, the Jewish population of Saskatchewan reached 5,047, and the numbers have been declining ever since. The 2001 census counted 2,090 Jews in the Province, which has had a negative population growth in its general popul ation for many years

 
DaSleeper
+1
#9
Ruti eresiniy olerumep opono mewuli eru tat nefu ocitir. Ta inisegot ruho. Qo eniga medis wogoce niepiri yo. Rapira nas mare duna riyinah! Emiteni ruf etu menaver huyu hi, enesa ela tuk fenebu lid: Onieh anan one; tesoket erote leho. Ates ta arupu sec araga ilod ieciyatow ticeye ecetope sey, orogenat siliedon mieg yecoc gotaro. Rana ter riepeces urivarit enidid pi. Selal orat goc sucep nos edeh anubemir epen. Pu to litaca ene beg lonebak leropag to enor hemip. Rip liyines nawego cerir ze pitub hid lobu bixamied sa! Cenef ma ayu runu cemun. Butinac lihem gefa gu ti sir edemat ivuci cehik sil, idiey awac re: Oneseme samenic selinir ye ihoda user femaw ilod emuta; xicienel tolok dofelo gac ta yehet ticusi.
 
Blackleaf
#10
Karl's Alaskan Igloo

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=mrUAgmizZfY
 
MHz
#11
Kashmir, intentional century long shitstorm. STFU you immoral fukking retard.



Kashmir, Pak's latest Province, unlimited Hindu immigrants allowed, bring money. When 'you' are the majority 'you' can decide who picks up the tab.
 
MHz
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Karl's Alaskan Igloo

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=mrUAgmizZfY

They also gave you tobbacco, . . . cough, . . . loser and you don't even know it, . . . cough.
 
Blackleaf
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

They also gave you tobbacco, . . . cough, . . . loser and you don't even know it, . . . cough.


Blackadder: And doubtless many other members of the animal kingdom
feel the same way but - [crowd cheering rises again.
Blackadder gestures threateningly at the window]
Look, will you shut up?! Bloody explorers, ponce off
to mumbo-jumbo-land, come home with a tropical disease,
a suntan and a bag of brown lumpy things, and, Bob's your uncle,
everyone's got a picture of them in the lavatory. I mean,
what about the people that do all the work?

Baldrick: The servants.

Blackadder: No, me; *I'm* the people who do all the work. I mean *look*
at this! [goes to a table at the side of the room and
picks up a small brown thing and holds it up] *What* is it?

Baldrick: Oh, I'm surprised you've forgotten, my lord.

Blackadder: I haven't forgotten; it's a rhetorical question.

Baldrick: [looking at him] No, it's a potato.

Blackadder: To you it's a potato, to me it's a potato. But to
Sir Walter Bloody Raleigh it's country estates, fine carriages,
and as many girls as his tongue can cope with. He's making
a fortune out of the things; people are smoking them,
building houses out of them... They'll be eating them next.
[shoves it into Baldrick's chest; Baldrick takes it and looks
at it]

Baldrick: Stranger things have happened.

Blackadder: Oh, exactly.

Baldrick: [continues] That horse becoming Pope.

Blackadder: The what? [Someone knocks on the door and Baldrick goes to
answer it] Oh God. Probably some birk with a parrot on his
shoulder selling plaster gnomes of Sir Francis Drake and his
Golden beHind [A child is heard outside singing "sourpuss,
grumpy face, sourpuss, grumpy face..."[Miranda Richardson,
actually]. Edmund pulls out a bow, nocks an arrow and shoots.
The singing stops with an abrupt "aah! Mummy..."]
[Edmund shouts out the window] And another thing: why
aren't you at school?

[Melchett, followed by Baldrick comes in the room]

Melchett: Blackadder, started talking to yourself I see.

Blackadder: [Turning away from the window] Yes, it's the only way I can
be sure of intelligent conversation. What do you want?

Melchett: Well I just looked in on my way to the palace to welcome
Sir Walter home; I wondered if you cared to accompany me.

Blackadder: I don't think I'll bother, actually; three hours of
bluff seaman's talk about picking the weevils out of
biscuits and drinking urine is not my idea of a good time.

Melchett: As you wish. [To Baldrick] Servant, my hat. [Baldrick leaves.
Melchett holds out a box toward Blackadder] Potato?

Blackadder: Thanks, I don't. [
 
MHz
#14
Where is a 'leaky boat' when you need one, a big one.
 
DaSleeper
+1
#15
Aqe radus sotiton? Pi poruli fuhet enulitos he.
 
Jinentonix
+1 / -1
#16
Quote:

SNC can get multiple threads and intentional torment of Indians for decades rates not a single fuking word of sympathy from any member of the loco Jewish collective. Typical for a room full of psychopaths. By the time this thread is finished in about 2022 you will be well versed on the kind of shit your group has caused to the Indians even if there are still no tears.

F*ck off ya stupid c*nt. Do you think this is news? No, the ONLY thing about it that is "news" is Groper on yet another fake tears apology tour. How many f*cking times since being elected has Groper apologized to the Natives? This is at least what, round 4? What next? Apologize to the Germans living here for bombing the shit out of them in WW2?
 
taxslave
+2
#17
TrudOWE will give them each $10mill and all will be fine.
 
MHz
#18
https://aptnnews.ca/2017/10/27/aptn-...s-sanatoriums/
APTN Investigates: Reliving Indian and Inuit Tuberculosis Sanatoriums

APTN Investigates Gerald McIvor’s brother Michael was just four years old when he was sent off to Manitoba’s Ninette Tuberculosis Sanatorium in 1952. He spent four years there, mostly on bed rest.
Shortly before Michael McIvor died in 2000, Gerald McIvor vowed to help uncover what happened to him there.
“I promised my brother,” he said. “Our brother was our protector but he didn’t have a protector.”
Gerald McIvor started a Facebook group to gather alleged victims of medical experimentation and said he is in the first stages of organizing a class action lawsuit.
“It is really driving home my ambition to see that these people have answers – they get some closure,” said McIvor. “More importantly they get judicial redress for what was done to them. These are little children, humans, not guinea pigs.”
(Michael McIvor in an undated photo. Courtesy Gerald McIvor)
APTN Investigates travelled across the country, digging through archives and visiting the sites of former so-called Indian hospitals and tuberculosis sanatoria.
McIvor recalled his brother describing procedures that sounded to him, like medical experiments.
“He would share vivid details of what happened,” he said. “Carts brought into the dormitories with little bottles of different coloured liquids, with medical staff standing around them with clipboards, documenting every reaction.”

Then and now: the former Ninette Tuberculosis Sanatorium south of Brandon, Man. Photos: Holly Moore/APTN Investigates)
“It brings us a lot of memories,” said McIvor in an interview with APTN at the old site of the sanatorium site just south of Brandon, Man. “It is very peaceful but deceiving.”
The hilly seven-acre Ninette site is surrounded by a trailer park and other private homes, making it difficult to find.
Six of the original 12 buildings still stand, though just the administration building was open at the time. Inside, examination tables, machines and even medical instruments still stand.
“I call this my summer cottage,” laughed Ronnie Aschenbrenner, the current owner who bought the property from a local man in 2008.
She intended to open it up as a retreat for artists and writers but the cost of restoring and maintaining the century-old buildings was too high
Aschenbrenner is now selling the huge complex for just $575,000.
McIvor said it should be declared a historical site.


(L.B Foote Collection, Provincial Archives of Manitoba)
“This is a painful historical place for our people,” he said.
The sanatorium opened in May 1909 and according to archival records, the Sanatorium Board of Manitoba took over the epidemic of tuberculosis amongst the Indigenous population starting with a survey of reserves in 1937.
Click here to read letter from Dr. Edward L. Ross, Sanatorium Board of Manitoba
Tuberculosis is bacterial infection that spreads easily through the air. It had decimated the Indigenous population in Canada from the time of contact. Wracking coughs, fatigue, and weight loss are all symptoms. It can also lay dormant for years and then re-emerge. Advanced TB can cause holes to form in the lungs but it can also affect other parts of the body.
Antibiotic drugs were eventually developed but until then, the only cure was sanatorium rest. Surgeries like rib and lung removal would also be used in advanced disease.

“There’s a lot of trauma that communities and individuals experienced at these institutions about residential schools,” said Ian Mosby, a Toronto-based researcher. “Where I’ve been spoken at events and been at events where survivors are speaking, Indian hospitals invariably come up.”
He uncovered evidence of shocking nutritional experiments on Indigenous children at residential schools and points out that a full inquiry should be called into Indian hospitals and TB sanatoriums.
“Because the barrier between Indian hospitals and residential schools was very fluid.” he added. “It’s important that we listen to survivors.
(in part)

 
MHz
#19
I thought I would give 'Old Sloppy' a chance to decode the message in the story based on it being written by a psychopath and intended to be read and understood only by another psychopath.

Hint, those are nurses rather than patients in their room.
 
Mowich
+2
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

https://aptnnews.ca/2017/10/27/aptn-...s-sanatoriums/
APTN Investigates: Reliving Indian and Inuit Tuberculosis Sanatoriums

APTN Investigates Gerald McIvor’s brother Michael was just four years old when he was sent off to Manitoba’s Ninette Tuberculosis Sanatorium in 1952. He spent four years there, mostly on bed rest.
Shortly before Michael McIvor died in 2000, Gerald McIvor vowed to help uncover what happened to him there.
“I promised my brother,” he said. “Our brother was our protector but he didn’t have a protector.”
Gerald McIvor started a Facebook group to gather alleged victims of medical experimentation and said he is in the first stages of organizing a class action lawsuit.
“It is really driving home my ambition to see that these people have answers – they get some closure,” said McIvor. “More importantly they get judicial redress for what was done to them. These are little children, humans, not guinea pigs.”
(Michael McIvor in an undated photo. Courtesy Gerald McIvor)
APTN Investigates travelled across the country, digging through archives and visiting the sites of former so-called Indian hospitals and tuberculosis sanatoria.
McIvor recalled his brother describing procedures that sounded to him, like medical experiments.
“He would share vivid details of what happened,” he said. “Carts brought into the dormitories with little bottles of different coloured liquids, with medical staff standing around them with clipboards, documenting every reaction.”

Then and now: the former Ninette Tuberculosis Sanatorium south of Brandon, Man. Photos: Holly Moore/APTN Investigates)
“It brings us a lot of memories,” said McIvor in an interview with APTN at the old site of the sanatorium site just south of Brandon, Man. “It is very peaceful but deceiving.”
The hilly seven-acre Ninette site is surrounded by a trailer park and other private homes, making it difficult to find.
Six of the original 12 buildings still stand, though just the administration building was open at the time. Inside, examination tables, machines and even medical instruments still stand.
“I call this my summer cottage,” laughed Ronnie Aschenbrenner, the current owner who bought the property from a local man in 2008.
She intended to open it up as a retreat for artists and writers but the cost of restoring and maintaining the century-old buildings was too high
Aschenbrenner is now selling the huge complex for just $575,000.
McIvor said it should be declared a historical site.


(L.B Foote Collection, Provincial Archives of Manitoba)
“This is a painful historical place for our people,” he said.
The sanatorium opened in May 1909 and according to archival records, the Sanatorium Board of Manitoba took over the epidemic of tuberculosis amongst the Indigenous population starting with a survey of reserves in 1937.
Click here to read letter from Dr. Edward L. Ross, Sanatorium Board of Manitoba
Tuberculosis is bacterial infection that spreads easily through the air. It had decimated the Indigenous population in Canada from the time of contact. Wracking coughs, fatigue, and weight loss are all symptoms. It can also lay dormant for years and then re-emerge. Advanced TB can cause holes to form in the lungs but it can also affect other parts of the body.
Antibiotic drugs were eventually developed but until then, the only cure was sanatorium rest. Surgeries like rib and lung removal would also be used in advanced disease.

“There’s a lot of trauma that communities and individuals experienced at these institutions about residential schools,” said Ian Mosby, a Toronto-based researcher. “Where I’ve been spoken at events and been at events where survivors are speaking, Indian hospitals invariably come up.”
He uncovered evidence of shocking nutritional experiments on Indigenous children at residential schools and points out that a full inquiry should be called into Indian hospitals and TB sanatoriums.
“Because the barrier between Indian hospitals and residential schools was very fluid.” he added. “It’s important that we listen to survivors.
(in part)

Factual documented evidence doesn't seem to be important to those who feel that believing oral testimony suffices.
 
MHz
#21
The documents are there, when read by a critical eye the lies stand out like a sore thumb.

The most damning part I have posted is the narration in the 'History of South Africa', is that why you want fuk all to do with that but prefer to take the 'supporting documents' as lacking proof the incidents even took place. The Baffin Correctional Center has a history of criminal incompetence of the whole staff or all the notes being taken were part of the things World Bankers Medical Doctors rather than they were acting on the behalf of the Canadian Government or the RCC, who was running the Residential School that supplies most of the 'lab rats' that later died in the hospitals.
You people are fukked and you make it worse by claiming innocence that it even happened.



https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia....tals-in-canada
Indian Hospitals in Canada

During the 20th century, the federal government established racially segregated “Indian hospitals” for the treatment of First Nations and Inuit peoples in Canada. With the coming of medicare in the late 1960s, the government began to close most of the Indian hospitals, though it continues to operate hospitals at Norway House and Hodgson in Manitoba.

Fort Qu’Appelle Indian Hospital, Saskatchewan
(courtesy Saskatchewan Archives Board/Accession R96-472)
Built in 1936, the 50-bed Fort Qu'Appelle Indian Hospital sat across Echo Lake from Saskatchewan's provincial sanatorium. It was the site of Dr. RG Ferguson's BCG vaccine trial on Indigenous infants in the 1930s and 1940s.


Origin and Definition

Indian hospitals originate from federally-funded ​Christian ​missionary efforts to provide rudimentary hospital care on some ​reserves in the late 1800s and early 1900s. After the ​Second World War, the government aggressively expanded its system of Indian hospitals, which admitted patients based on ​Indian status, rather than disease. By 1960, the government owned 22 hospitals with more than 2,200 beds, mostly in ​Ontario and westward.

Indian hospitals did not provide Indigenous medicines, midwives or holistic notions of illness and its treatment. To the contrary, the hospitals were intended to further assimilationist goals and replace traditional healing with biomedicine. There were never any medical training programs for ​Indigenous people in the Indian hospitals. Although the institutions were originally justified to isolate ​tuberculosis, they functioned as racially segregated general hospitals. Certainly many people were made well in these hospitals, but patients, often far from home, recall loneliness, vulnerability, fear and, for some, abuse in strange institutions where medical staff did not understand their cultures and ​languages.


Establishment of Indian Hospitals

Most Indian hospitals were established in buildings that the government already owned, such as residential schools and facilities of the ​armed forces​. The large, open wards suitable for the armed forces that only treated men were quite inappropriate when the patients also included women and children. The buildings were often overcrowded and fire was a constant concern. There was limited government funding for needed renovations to stop the dangerous spread of disease because health care for Indigenous people was not a priority. At the two Indian hospitals opened in the 1930s, the Fort Qu’Appelle Indian Hospital in Saskatchewan and Dynevor Indian Hospital in Manitoba, the government found that they could operate at half the cost of care in community hospitals, which encouraged a rapid post–Second World War expansion of Indian hospitals.
Though they were never consulted, many Indigenous communities that had been suffering for years from poverty and overcrowded housing that led to disease welcomed the promise of better health and hospital care similar to what settler society enjoyed. But Indian hospitals were not like the hospitals in surrounding non-Indigenous communities. The poor living conditions at the root of much disease remained.
Many First Nations also welcomed Indian hospitals as the state’s recognition of its legal and treaty responsibility for health care. Those who signed the 11 ​Numbered Treaties​ understood health care and medicines to be included in the treaties’ terms. These promises were discussed during many of the treaty negotiations, but they failed to appear in the written text. The sole exception was ​Treaty 6​ (1876), which promised Indigenous signatories and their people a “medicine chest.” Every year when treaty annuities were paid, vaccinations and other medical care confirmed the clear link of health care to the treaty relationship. The government did not share this interpretation, however, instead claiming that it accepted only a humanitarian or moral obligation to provide health and hospital services for Indigenous people, specifically in order to protect the rest of the Canadian population from disease.
Postwar Expansion of the Indian Hospital System

In 1945, the Indian Health Services became part of the newly created Department of National Health and Welfare. A different arm of that bureaucracy would eventually implement the social safety net that included social services and health care insurance changes, such as medicare. (See also ​Health Policy​.) To start, in 1948, it provided annual matching public funds for provincial health care projects, such as disease control, medical education and hospital construction.
Hundreds of new hospitals offered settler communities modern health care, and created tremendous opportunities for nurses and doctors. Indian Health Services had difficulty finding medical professionals willing to work for low civil service wages in its overcrowded and poorly equipped Indian hospitals. In several communities, the Indian and local hospitals were literally side by side. Indian hospitals reflected and constructed racial inequality by making it seemingly natural that modernized hospitals would be “white” hospitals, and that Indigenous people were somehow less worthy of care. Under the expanded postwar Indian hospital system, the cost of care continued to be half that of surrounding community hospitals’ rates, with dire consequences for Indigenous patients.
Treatment of Indigenous Patients

Tuberculosis treatment in the 1940s and 1950s began to change from months and years of bed rest to lung surgery and finally to effective antimicrobial medications. Provincial tuberculosis sanatoriums emptied as outpatient treatment became the norm. But treatment for Indigenous patients was different.
Indian Health Services sent First Nations and, especially, Inuit patients from their northern homes to fill southern sanatoriums, often for years at a time. In sanatoriums and Indian hospitals, Indigenous patients underwent invasive chest surgery and drug treatment because they were not seen as capable of managing their condition at home like non-Indigenous patients. Survivors recall feeling lonely and vulnerable at the hands of ever-changing medical staff. The hospitals also provided opportunities for medical experimentation, most often without the patients’ consent. Fort Qu’Appelle hospital conducted experimental trials of the BCG vaccine for tuberculosis on infants; the Camsell Indian Hospital in Edmonton undertook a 1956 trial of various different preparations of the common anti-tuberculosis drug para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS), as well as clinical trials of thyroid-stimulating hormone for a study of hypothyroidism in “Native races.” Rambunctious children were often physically restrained in their beds, or by plaster casts on both legs. Patients in hospitals far from home often did not understand the language, and struggled to understand their treatment, if it was explained to them. Caregivers, many overworked and underpaid, took out their frustrations on patients. Children without family nearby were particularly vulnerable.
Many patients had no choice but to stay in Indian hospitals, regardless of the treatment they received. The ​Indian Act​ was amended in 1953 to include the Indian Health Regulations that made it a crime for Indigenous people to refuse to see a doctor, to refuse to go to hospital, and to leave hospital before discharge. The RCMP arrested patients and returned them to hospital or sent them to jail. However, the government would not return those who died at Indian hospitals to their communities unless the family paid the costs. Many were buried at the nearest cemetery in unmarked graves, forever lost to their families.
Closing Indian Hospitals

Indian hospitals were understaffed and underfunded because public funds went to build, equip and staff modern hospitals in non-Indigenous communities, leading to national programs of hospital insurance (1957) and then health insurance or medicare (196. By the 1960s, the government planned to close Indian hospitals and instead fund community hospital expansion to accommodate First Nations patients. Local organization, particularly (but not exclusively) in Treaty 6 communities, resisted government plans to close the hospitals. Certainly, Indigenous communities recognized the many problems at the underfunded and poorly equipped Indian hospitals. Nevertheless, the hospitals, especially those near reserve communities, had also become valued institutions providing needed wage labour, though always in lower paid support positions, such as domestic maid, ward aide and janitor. First Nations hospital workers served as translators and cultural brokers, making patients more comfortable by speaking to them in their own languages.
However, activists argued that government funds that were meant for their health care should be used to improve the underfunded Indian hospitals, not given to settler community hospitals. In the 1960s, First Nations organizers at North Battleford Indian Hospital in Saskatchewan refused to pay provincial hospital and health taxes, arguing that the medicine chest clause meant that they had a treaty right to health care. It was not about the money, but the larger principle about treaty rights. The government took them to court, where the local magistrate agreed that the treaty right existed for all Indians under the Indian Act. The government appealed the decision, and on appeal, the court decided that the medicine chest clause could be ignored. After decades of First Nations resistance, in 1979, the government finally recognized its constitutional and treaty responsibilities for health care, which remains its Indian Health Policy.
Most Indian hospitals closed and some were converted into primary care clinics. First Nations resistance was not intended to preserve the inadequate Indian hospitals, but to urge the government to acknowledge its treaty commitments and to help them address the health disparities that so many communities endured. Their resistance represented a broader effort at self-determination to address poverty, overcrowded housing, contaminated water, and inadequate infrastructure that gave rise to much illness in the first place.
Reconciliation

On 25 January 2018, former patients of Indian hospitals filed a $1.1-billion class-action lawsuit against the federal government. They are seeking financial compensation and a formal acknowledgement of the government’s negligence in the operation of Indian hospitals.


 

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