Police Officer Killed after being pinned under vehicle


petros
#31
What a ****ty coincidence.

If you are an R.C. today was Blue Mass. (Honouring of the Police)

My mom and Mrs went and just got home.

The Bishop gave a sermon and prayer dedicated to Const. Garrett Styles.

 
Cliffy
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Bear **** looks like black olives not cupcakes.

Unlike Grizzly poop that has little bells in it and smells like pepper.
 
petros
#33
Bells as in the flowers?
 
Cliffy
#34
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Bells as in the flowers?

Bells as in the little dinner bells people wear on the clothing in the false impression it will warn bears of human presence. Grizzlies have been conditioned to know the bells mean a soft, crunchy lunch.
 
petros
#35
Apparently we taste like pork.
 
Just the Facts
#36
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Bells as in the little dinner bells people wear on the clothing in the false impression it will warn bears of human presence. Grizzlies have been conditioned to know the bells mean a soft, crunchy lunch.

lol

 
spaminator
#37
MANDEL: Driver in joyride that killed cop appeals conviction
Michele Mandel
Published:
March 12, 2019
Updated:
March 12, 2019 9:52 PM EDT
Melissa Styles is pictured outside Osgoode Hall. Her husband, Const. Garrett Styles, was killed when a young driver rolled a van the constable had pulled over. The driver is appealing his murder conviction. (Craig Robertson, Toronto Sun)
He doesn’t want to be a convicted murderer.
Almost four years after the teen was convicted of first-degree murder in the death of York Regional Police Const. Garrett Styles, the joyriding driver known only as S.K. was in the Ontario Court of Appeal asking that the verdict be overturned.
It was June 28, 2011 — and the first day of summer holidays — when 15-year-old S.K. snuck out of his house and took his family’s minivan for the second time in five months. “He hadn’t learned his lesson,” acknowledged his lawyer James Lockyer.
He was driving three friends along Hwy. 48 when he was pulled over by Styles for going 147 km/h in an 80 km/h zone. It should have just been a routine traffic stop.
When the unlicensed teen refused to get out of the vehicle so it could be impounded, continually begging Styles to let him go because his parents were going to “kill” him, the officer finally opened the driver’s door and reached in to undo his seatbelt.
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What ensued was a tragedy on all sides: The van accelerated across the highway, entered a field, became airborne and rolled before coming to a stop. Styles, who’d been dragged by the careening vehicle, was ejected from the van and pinned under the driver’s side tire, where he soon died of his injuries.
Just 32, the officer left behind a wife and two small children.
York Regional Police Const. Garrett Styles
As for the driver, the crash broke S.K.’s neck in three places and rendered him a quadriplegic who requires around-the-clock care. The jury found the youth intentionally accelerated to get away and should have known it would “likely” lead to the death of the police officer.
But lucky for him, Justice Alex Sosna spared him any prison time, sentencing S.K. instead to a conditional supervision order for nine years.
“S.K. is already serving a life sentence,” Sosna said in his controversial November, 2015 decision. “He is a prisoner in his own body.”
The Crown, however, is appealing that decision, arguing S.K. should have been sent to an open custody facility. Meanwhile, the defence wants the appeal court to overturn his first-degree murder conviction as “unreasonable” and order a retrial on manslaughter alone.
Now 23, S.K. — heavy set and wearing glasses — was in the small courtroom in his wheelchair, his parents at his side. Behind them, sat Styles’ widow, Melissa, and other family members.
S.K.’s lawyer contended S.K. was startled when Styles suddenly “launched himself into the vehicle,” and panicking, the teen accidentally hit the accelerator instead of the brake. American collision reconstruction expert Dr. Chris Van Ee had testified during the trial that “pedal misapplication” or “unintentional acceleration” could have played a role in the crash.
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But Lockyer complained the judge didn’t allow the jury to hear that S.K. told his father what happened about a month after the incident and that his version — that he froze, that he was trying to brake and that he was pretty sure he didn’t do anything to make the van move forward — was “textbook unintentional acceleration.”
While S.K.’s recollection meshed with Ee’s expert testimony that would come years later, S.K.’s conversation with his father was ruled inadmissible. Instead, Lockyer said, the Crown was unfairly allowed to insinuate S.K. was fabricating his panic and confusion to match the defence expert.
“He was a kid when all this happened,” Lockyer insisted.
The Crown argues its sentence appeal Wednesday.
mmandel@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...als-conviction
Last edited by spaminator; Mar 14th, 2019 at 03:26 AM..
 
spaminator
#38
MANDEL: Young driver who killed cop is back behind the wheel
Michele Mandel
Published:
March 13, 2019
Updated:
March 13, 2019 7:20 PM EDT
York Regional Police Const. Garrett Styles
This hardly looks like remorse.
As an underage and unlicensed driver who snuck out to go joyriding with his parents’ minivan, 15-year-old S.K. (his name protected by a publication ban) took off from a traffic stop and dragged Const. Garrett Styles to his death in June 2011.
In November 2015, S.K. was sentenced to what was widely regarded as a light youth sentence after a jury found him guilty of first-degree murder for causing the death of the York Regional Police officer. Although he faced up to 10 years in custody, he was given nine years of community supervision — essentially probation.
Ontario Superior Court Justice Alex Sosna felt S.K. would suffer enough because the accident had left him a quadriplegic. He also didn’t believe S.K.’s “extensive” medical needs could be handled in custody.
Melissa Styles is pictured outside Osgoode Hall on Tuesday. Her husband, Const. Garrett Styles, was killed when a young driver rolled a van the constable had pulled over. The driver is appealing his murder conviction. (Craig Robertson, Toronto Sun)
But less than a month after his sentencing, says Crown attorney Andreea Baiasu, she’s learned S.K. was actually back behind the wheel and by May 2016, he’d passed his G1.
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“It calls into question whether he’s genuinely remorseful for what he did in what was a horrific and tragic incident,” Baiasu told the Ontario Court of Appeal.
At his sentencing, the evidence was all about S.K.’s long list of dire injuries and how he would need care around the clock. If they’d known he was well enough to operate a car, Baiasu said, the Crown would have asked for a driving ban as part of his sentence to reflect the “enormity of the offence” and to protect the public.
“This is not something realistically contemplated at his sentencing,” the prosecutor complained. “The notion that he would be getting behind the wheel of a vehicle so quickly after sentencing comes as a bit of surprise.”
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As S.K. listened from his wheelchair, and Styles’ family members murmured in agreement, the Crown asked that his sentence be overturned and include a period of open custody and a driving prohibition.
Sentencing Styles’ killer to a conditional supervision order was “totally inadequate to hold this young person accountable for what is the most serious offence under the Criminal Code,” Baiasu told the three-judge panel.
She argued the judge gave too much weight to S.K.’s injuries when they were a direct result of his own decision to flee the scene: He took off after Styles told him he was impounding his van for travelling 147 km/h in an 80 km/h zone on Hwy. 48.
After the teen repeatedly refused to get out, Styles opened his door and was reaching in to unbuckle him when the vehicle suddenly accelerated almost 300 metres down the highway, carrying the officer with half his body dangling outside, eventually going airborne and flipping, killing Styles and injuring S.K.
In his conviction appeal heard Tuesday, S.K.’s lawyers insisted he shouldn’t have been found guilty of murder because the teen panicked and unintentionally stepped on the gas instead of the brake.
Not only was he rightfully convicted of murder, the Crown countered, but S.K. deserves a stint in custody. The defence argued that no facility exists that can possibly care for his “extensive needs.”
Yet, it may not be as impossible as they’ve made it out to be: The appeal court heard that despite his condition, S.K. has been living in a university dorm with just the assistance of a personal support worker.
The judges have reserved their decision on both S.K.’s conviction appeal and the Crown’s appeal on sentence.
mmandel@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...hind-the-wheel
 

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