Summation of Wynne's Minimum Wage Announcement


JLM
#91
The problem is not so much the minimum wage as who it is that sets it.
 
Jinentonix
+1
#92
Quote: Originally Posted by Bar Sinister View Post

I've heard all that before. And yet in places where the minimum wage has actually been increased there is no evidence of a negative impact. That is probably due to the fact that the total increase in business costs is estimated to be less than 10%. Not only that but every business is affected in the same way, resulting in no advantage for anyone. And your restaurant cook example seems rather pointless given that they will be one of those receiving an increase.

Not pointless at all. Minimum wage is $11.40/hr. The average wage for a restaurant cook is $13.43/hr. Are the cooks simply going to be bumped up to $15/hr? Do you understand the problem as I stated it? Why should a dish washer be paid the same as a cook?
Quote: Originally Posted by Bar Sinister View Post

And in Alberta it is being done incrementally and apparently that is the case in Ontario as well if 2019 is the intended date of the final raise.

31.5% in 12 months is not incremental. First off, in Oct of this year it will go up a whole 20 cents/hr.
Jan.1 2018 the rate will increase to $14/hr followed by another $1/hr increase 12 months later. If that's your definition of "incremental", you sure have a funny way of defining it.
Ontario's Financial Accountability Office is warning that a jump this large, this fast will lead to at least 50,000 job losses which will be concentrated among teens and young adults.
The FAO also estimates that only 27 per cent of the total gain in labour income from the higher minimum wage would be expected to benefit low-income families, with the remainder of the gain going to families who are already above the low-income threshold.
Plus, in your second sentence you missed a very important factor. Did those places also have a federal govt deciding it's time to goon small business owners? This is a blatant two pronged attack on the sector that's primarily responsible for driving the economy. You also fail to mention those "places" are just cities, not a full province with widely diverse labour markets. Seattle for example is a single labour market. Ontario is a HUGE province with labour markets ranging from the mega-city that is Toronto to the small, northern communities and rural areas.
Sure, corporations like McDonalds could probably easily deal with the increase, or they could simply say "f*ck it" and go fully automated.
Meanwhile, John Doe who put his blood, sweat, and money into a small business will have pretty much no good options. Pay the increase to all his employees while driving his prices up or taking a hit to his profit margin. Or he can choose to reduce the number of employees or ultimately, he could just say "f*ck it" and shut it down entirely.

That 31.5% jump in wages also means a move to a higher tax bracket for at source deductions which translates into more tax dollars in the provincial coffers for the Libtards to piss away on nothing as usual. Presuming of course their minimum wage legislation goes according to plan.

The Canadian Centre for Economic Analysis raised the possibility that 185,000 low wage jobs in Ontario are at risk and could disappear over the next two years.

I guess we'll see how this starts to play out in a little over three months. I genuinely hope I'm wrong but I have a bad feeling about this.
 
JLM
#93
Quote: Originally Posted by Bar Sinister View Post

I've heard all that before. And yet in places where the minimum wage has actually been increased there is no evidence of a negative impact. That is probably due to the fact that the total increase in business costs is estimated to be less than 10%. Not only that but every business is affected in the same way, resulting in no advantage for anyone. And your restaurant cook example seems rather pointless given that they will be one of those receiving an increase. And in Alberta it is being done incrementally and apparently that is the case in Ontario as well if 2019 is the intended date of the final raise.


What the f**k are you talking about. Have you not noticed the price of a hamburger has risen from 35 cents to $10? Or the price of a quart of milk has gone from 14 cents to $1.50?
 
pgs
#94
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

What the f**k are you talking about. Have you not noticed the price of a hamburger has risen from 35 cents to $10? Or the price of a quart of milk has gone from 14 cents to $1.50?

Of course not , his mom cooks for him .
 
Jinentonix
#95
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

What the f**k are you talking about. Have you not noticed the price of a hamburger has risen from 35 cents to $10? Or the price of a quart of milk has gone from 14 cents to $1.50?

"Well the price of meat has just gone up and your old lady has just gone down." -Frank Zappa, Cosmik Debris.

Look, I'm not arguing against raising the minimum wage but the fact is, Ontario is in uncharted waters here raising it this much this quickly. No sovereign or sub-sovereign state has ever increased minimum wage this much in such a short period of time that I'm aware of. At least BC is doing it over 4 years instead of 12 months.
Bar's comparing the effects on a single labour market (a city) with a multiple labour market (a province or country) is disingenuous.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#96
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

"Well the price of meat has just gone up and your old lady has just gone down." -Frank Zappa, Cosmik Debris.

Look, I'm not arguing against raising the minimum wage but the fact is, Ontario is in uncharted waters here raising it this much this quickly. No sovereign or sub-sovereign state has ever increased minimum wage this much in such a short period of time that I'm aware of. At least BC is doing it over 4 years instead of 12 months.
Bar's comparing the effects on a single labour market (a city) with a multiple labour market (a province or country) is disingenuous.

OK, well, that's a good thing, right? They made a bold move, apparently agreed to by a majority of the local population, and if they're right, the boldness of the people and the pols is rewarded, and if they're wrong, they're f*cked.

Time will tell, for the tiny fraction of the population that bases their politics on facts. Which, in my opinion, includes you.
 
petros
#97
Ontario
 
JLM
#98
Quote: Originally Posted by WLDB View Post

If businesses can't afford to pay a living wage they can't afford the cost of business. I'm well above $15 so the raise won't affect me all that much.



Quite a few places already had self checkouts. I first noticed them around 2011 which was years before this announcement. These bots were coming either way. People also tend to forget that there still needs to be people behind the machine both for maintenance and to prepare whatever the order is. The bots may be cheaper but if you totally eliminated the people around them the business would lose a lot of money to theft. It's pretty easy to get around those things if you want to and if no ones looking. I've never done it but I've seen it happen.


If you are earning $15 an hour you likely have to be pulling in $30 for the employer and that's over and above overhead. Can you do that at A & W?
 
Bar Sinister
+1
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

What the f**k are you talking about. Have you not noticed the price of a hamburger has risen from 35 cents to $10? Or the price of a quart of milk has gone from 14 cents to $1.50?

Can't reply without swearing? I guess your point is so weak you think it needs a little help. In fact it is so ridiculous that it does not even warrant a reply.
 
spaminator
#100
Grocery chain Metro cutting 280 jobs as part of modernization
The Canadian Press
First posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 10:51 AM EDT | Updated: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 10:53 AM EDT
Grocery store chain Metro Inc. says it will eliminate about 280 jobs starting in 2021 as part of a $400-million overhaul of its Ontario distribution network.
The company says the move to modernize and automate its network will mean the loss of about 180 full-time and 100 part-time positions.
The announcement follows comments by Metro in August that it would study automation as it looked to cut costs in the face of the Ontario government’s plan to raise the minimum wage next year.
Metro has six distribution centres in Ontario including four in Toronto and two in Ottawa that employ a total of more than 1,500 workers.
It says its existing distribution network in Toronto no longer meets the needs of its business.
The company plans to modernize the operations in Toronto between 2018 and 2023 with the building of a new fresh distribution facility and a new frozen distribution centre.
“This investment will enable Metro to continue its growth and expansion in the Ontario market,” Metro chief executive Eric La Fleche said in a statement.
“With a new and modernized supply chain infrastructure, we will be even more responsive to the needs of our customers.”
Grocery chain Metro cutting 280 jobs as part of modernization | Ontario | News |
 
White_Unifier
+1
#101
If the government were serious about the minimum wage, they'd pin its value to gold to resist inflation. the reason they won't do it is because they know the minimum wage harms the poor so they use it as a vote getter and then just inflate the economy back to before afterwards. clever, really.
 
spaminator
#102
Loblaw Companies Ltd. announces lay off of 500 workers
Aleksandra Sagan, THE CANADIAN PRESS
First posted: Monday, October 16, 2017 04:24 PM EDT | Updated: Monday, October 16, 2017 09:01 PM EDT
VANCOUVER — Loblaw Companies Ltd. is laying off 500 of its office workers, but the company says it still expects to create more jobs than it eliminates this year.
“Today is a very difficult day,” wrote president Sarah Davis in a memo to employees informing them about the job cuts.
Some of the laid off employees were told Monday and many of the positions will be eliminated immediately, she said.
The 500 jobs come from all levels of store-support offices, she said, including various executives.
“Our business is at an inflection point, with growing pressures — from new costs and new competition — and with many opportunities to grow and evolve,” Davis said, adding the company remains committed to reducing costs and running efficiently.
Loblaw (TSX:L) is making major investments in omni-channel, financial services and other growing areas and expects to create hundreds of near-term jobs and be a “considerable net-job-creator this year,” she said.
The decision comes after Metro Inc. (TSX:MRU) announced last week it would eliminate about 280 jobs starting in 2021 as the grocery-store chain modernizes and automates its distribution network. Metro said the choice is unrelated to its efforts to offset added costs from Ontario’s rising minimum wage.
Grocers and other retailers have expressed concerns over rising minimum wages in some Canadian provinces.
Loblaw spokesman Kevin Groh said the grocery industry faces a variety of pressures and the announced job cuts don’t relate to any single one, including rising minimum wage.
Loblaw employs about 200,000 people, he said.
Loblaw Companies Ltd. announces lay off of 500 workers | Money | Toronto Sun
 
Hoid
#103
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

Thanks To 'Fight For $15' Minimum Wage, McDonald's Unveils Job-Replacing Self-Service Kiosks Nationwide
https://www.forbes.com/sites/realspi.../#534aadd4fbc6
That's ROBOTS for those of you that learned to read in school

It used to be the leftii would just force everyone down to labor camp payscale
now they got bots that can work cheaper

The loss of jobs to technology is one of the things driving the need to raise wages - especially minimum wages.

As usual I am left wondering how any of this is a win for you personally.

Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

The problem is not so much the minimum wage as who it is that sets it.

Actually the problem is a work force facing accelerated change and innovation.
 
JLM
+2
#104
Quote: Originally Posted by Bar Sinister View Post

Can't reply without swearing? I guess your point is so weak you think it needs a little help. In fact it is so ridiculous that it does not even warrant a reply.


You, like everyone else is entitled to your opinion, but remember, it's only an opinion.

Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

If the government were serious about the minimum wage, they'd pin its value to gold to resist inflation. the reason they won't do it is because they know the minimum wage harms the poor so they use it as a vote getter and then just inflate the economy back to before afterwards. clever, really.


Wages should be up to the market place and gov't should keep its nose out of it. Gov'ts. are NOT experts when it comes to dealing with money. (or much else for that matter)
 
spaminator
#105
Minimum wage hike prompts Ontario businesses to raise prices, consider staff cuts
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
December 31, 2017
Updated:
December 31, 2017 11:33 AM EST
Kevin Flynn, Minister of Labour talks at the Somerset West Community Health Centre, Nov. 08, 2017.Photo by Jean Levac
TORONTO — Ontario’s new $14 per hour minimum wage does not take effect until Jan. 1, but Chris Stevens has already taken steps to ensure his restaurant can afford the added expense.
The co-owner of Kaboom Chicken in Toronto’s Leslieville neighbourhood has raised menu prices in anticipation of the wage hike. He and his business partner also plan to reduce their staff’s hours in the new year and take on more of the work themselves in order to save money.
New Year’s Day marks the first of two scheduled hikes, with the second to take place on Jan. 1, 2019, when the minimum wage will go up to $15. After that, it will be adjusted to keep pace with inflation.
The Ontario government says the change will bring greater purchasing power for working families and a stronger economy overall, but many small business owners across the province are wondering how they will maintain profits in the face of increasing payroll costs.
“It’s hard to see a way that you can lose that much of your revenue in a short period of time without having to revamp a lot of things — either letting staff go, doing a lot of the work yourself, raising prices,” Stevens said.
“We believe the minimum wage should go up and people should make a living wage, however I think (the hike) puts the onus on small businesses,” he added.
Dan Rishworth’s Toronto bicycle shop, Enduro Sport, employs seven permanent, full-time staff members and hires several young people as seasonal workers each summer when business picks up. The minimum wage increase could result in the store hiring fewer summer workers from now on, Rishworth said.
“I think at this point we’re not going to hire six summer people any longer, we’re going to hire only three or four,” he said.
The increase in payroll will also result in upper-level staff receiving fewer or smaller raises, Rishworth added.
“And I’m anticipating that (more senior) staff who are already getting $15 an hour are going to expect to get $17 or $18 or more because minimum wage is approaching $15,” he said.
The Financial Accountability Office of Ontario — an independent watchdog agency that reports to the provincial legislature — has estimated that the minimum wage hikes could result in a loss of 50,000 jobs as employers struggle to keep up with staffing costs.
“Some businesses will attempt to reduce expenses by substituting minimum wage employees for higher paid, more productive workers or by increasing automation,” the agency said in a report released in September. “This would lead to some job losses for minimum-wage workers.
But the higher minimum wage would also increase consumer spending, “stimulate economic activity and lead to job creation (that could) offset some of the loss in employment,” it said.
Ontario Minister of Labour Kevin Flynn said last week that he doesn’t believe the “doom and gloom” predictions about rising minimum wage hurting businesses or leading to unemployment.
“We’ve raised minimum wage 70 per cent since 2003 and we’ve seen increased employment right through that period,” Flynn said at a news conference.
“I think we’ve proven we can work with small business. We are lowering the tax rate, we’re lowering the burden on small business so we’re asking them to play a part here,” he added, referencing the Liberal government’s elimination of the capital tax for businesses, and reduced income tax rates for small businesses.
“This money is going to go right back into Main Street, it’s going to go right back into the mom and pop businesses that … are concerned,” the minister added. “(But) it’s going to take an adjustment…It’s going to take a change.”
In June, over 50 economists at universities across Canada co-wrote an open letter supporting Ontario’s $15 minimum wage plan, in part, they said, because higher wages make for a stronger economy.
“As those with lower incomes spend more of what they earn than do those with higher incomes, raising the minimum wage could play a role in economic revival,” the economists wrote.
“For years, we have heard that raising the minimum wage will kill jobs, raise prices and cause businesses to flee Ontario. This is fear-mongering that is out of line with the latest economic research.”
But some small-business owners are skeptical they’ll see a financial benefit.
Stevens said there is no guarantee the higher minimum wage will lead to more money being spent, particularly at restaurants and bars.
“What are you giving them more money for? Is it so that they can go to restaurants and spend money and have a nightlife, or to put food on the table and pay the rent?” he said.
Minimum wage hike prompts Ontario businesses to raise prices, consider staff cuts | Toronto Sun

Bank of Canada report estimates 60,000 fewer jobs by 2019 due to minimum wage increases
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
January 3, 2018
Updated:
January 3, 2018 11:26 AM EST
A woman walks past the Bank of Canada Wednesday September 6, 2017 in Ottawa.Adrian Wyld / THE CANADIAN PRESS
OTTAWA — The Bank of Canada estimates there will be about 60,000 fewer jobs by 2019 due to the increases in minimum wages across the country, but that labour income will be higher due to the increases.
In examining the impact of the wage increases, the report estimated that the consumer price index could be boosted by about 0.1 percentage points on average and real gross domestic product could be cut by 0.1% by early 2019.
The number of jobs lost was based on a 0.3% decline in the number of hours worked, while aggregate real wages were estimated to increase 0.7%.
Read the full report here:
View this document on Scribd
The research paper by the staff at the central bank noted that if the average working hours declined following the increase in the minimum wage, the number of jobs lost would also be lower.
The Bank of Canada estimated that about 8% of all employees work at minimum wage, a proportion that increases to 11% if a threshold of 5% above minimum wage is used.
Ontario raised its minimum wage to $14 per hour on Jan. 1 from $11.60 and plans to increase it to $15 in 2019, while Alberta is expected to raise its minimum wage to $15 later this year.
http://bankofcanada.ca/wp-content/up...san2017-26.pdf
Bank of Canada report estimates 60,000 fewer jobs by 2019 due to minimum wage increases | Toronto Sun

Tim Hortons franchise owned by kids of founders to cut paid breaks, benefits over Ont. minimum wage hike: Report
Postmedia News
More from Postmedia News
Published:
January 3, 2018
Updated:
January 3, 2018 2:23 PM EST
(Postmedia Network File Photo)
The coffee at a Cobourg, Ont., Tim Hortons has gone bitter after owners sent staff a letter saying the franchise is cutting paid breaks, health benefits and other incentives in light of the provincial minimum wage hike, according to a report by CBC News.
Ron Joyce Jr. and Jeri-Lynn Horton-Joyce, the son and daughter of founders Ron Joyce and Tim Horton, own the franchise, located 115 km east of Toronto.
The document, a copy of which was obtained by Postmedia Network, details various changes to its policies “due to the increase of wages to $14.00 minimum wage on January 1, 2018, then $15.00 per hour on January 1, 2019, as well as the lack of assistance and financial help from our Head Office and from the Government.”
“Breaks will no longer be paid,” it states and goes on to give examples of how each shift will be calculated. “A 9 hour shift will be paid for 8 hours and 20 minutes. 8 hour shift will be paid for 7 hours and 30 minutes…” and so on.
The document also details reductions to its health and dental benefits plans. Workers with five years or more experience will now have to pay up to 50% of their benefits. They used to be 100% covered, an employee told CBC News.
A worker that has been there between 6 months and five years will now have to reportedly pay up to 75% of the benefit costs.
The Tim Hortons franchise has also eliminated a couple of other perks regarding employees working on their birthday and getting a day off with pay after six months of employment. All of these changes took effect Jan. 1.
The form cordially ends “Sincerely, Jeri, Ron and Lisa” and tells workers to sign and date it to indicate they understand the new policy.
Tim Hortons heirs cut paid breaks and worker benefits after minimum wage hike, employees say - Business - CBC News
Tim Hortons franchise owned by kids of founders to cut paid breaks, benefits over Ont. minimum wage hike: Report | Toronto Sun
Last edited by spaminator; Jan 3rd, 2018 at 10:28 PM..
 
Hoid
+1
#106
This wage hike is less of an expense than CEO pay.
 
tay
#107
Just for the record, the Ron Joyce family is worth about $1.3 billion USD.........
https://www.therichest.com/celebnetw...yce-net-worth/
 
Walter
#108
Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

Just for the record, the Ron Joyce family is worth about $1.3 billion USD.........
https://www.therichest.com/celebnetw...yce-net-worth/

Good for them.

Thanks, Dyke-bitch.
Employees at some Tim Hortons reportedly see benefits cut over minimum wage hike | Fox News

Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

This wage hike is less of an expense than CEO pay.

So what.
 
spaminator
#109
Rising minimum wages could speed up automation, labour leaders warn
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
January 10, 2018
Updated:
January 10, 2018 8:00 AM EST
Unifor President Jerry Dias.Chris Young / THE CANADIAN PRESS
MONTREAL — Companies might not be able to dodge rising minimum wages by relocating even their most mobile workforces to lower wage provinces, but higher costs could accelerate the pace of automation.
“It would be foolish of some employers to think that they can escape temporarily by moving their operations,” said Canadian Labour Congress president Hassan Yussuff.
While companies may get a short-term benefit, he said the reality is that minimum wages across the country are going to keep increasing.
Unifor president Jerry Dias said pressure is being placed on every province to boost entry wages that mostly affect retail and service sectors, where relocation is not an option.
“This is spreading across the country like a very good epidemic and so they can run but they can’t hide,” he said in an interview.
Cash register (Postmedia files)
Some businesses have criticized the pace of wage hikes in Ontario and Alberta.
On Jan .1, Ontario boosted hourly minimum wage by 20 per cent — from an $11.60 to $14. The rate will rise to $15 an hour in 2019. Alberta is expected to raise its minimum wage to $15 later this year.
But the union leaders argue that higher wages will ultimately help businesses as low income earners are more apt to spend all they earn and boost the economy.
Jobs that can easily be done from any location, such as call centre work, are theoretically most likely to shift locations. But the reality is that many of these positions pay much higher than entry wages, said Rob Campbell, president of ContactNB, which represents New Brunswick’s large contact centre community.
Would be political suicide
Air Canada and WestJet Airlines say they have adjusted the wages of their call centre positions and have no plans to move these jobs to other provinces.
Some companies may move jobs say from Ottawa to Gatineau, Que., but the numbers will be very small, said Fabian Lange, associate professor at McGill University’s Department of Economics.
But don’t expect provinces to woo businesses with the promise of lower wages.
He said it would be “politically problematic” for provinces with lower minimum wages to run big campaigns that emphasize how many low wage workers they have.
“It would be political suicide to do that because ultimately they’re all going to be at $15,” added Dias.
Provinces cannot guarantee that their minimum wages won’t unexpectedly rise, said University of Alberta economics associate professor Joseph Marchand.
“No one really saw Alberta’s $15 minimum wage coming. In 2014, it was one of the three lowest minimum wage provinces,” he said.
A shopper does self-checkout.
Marchand said rising minimum wages could speed up a growing trend to automate with the addition of ATMs, restaurant order screens and grocery self-checkout lines.
“It’s happening because technology is moving at a constant rate so that’s making capital cheaper year by year, but then if you have a drastic shift in labour costs that’s only going to speed up the process.”
A report from the Brookfield Institute on the Canadian jobs most at risk of automation found employees in the lowest-paid sectors, such as cashiers and food and beverage servers, are most vulnerable.
Canadian retailers such as Dollarama Inc. and Metro Inc. have said they are speeding up studies of automation as they consider options for offsetting the pending wage increase.
But the shift to automation over the last couple of decades has little to do with wage hikes, said labour representative Yussuff.
“There is recognition that more and more automation is coming to a lot of sectors in society and that’s long before the minimum wage has been increased.”
Rising minimum wages could speed up automation, labour leaders warn | Toronto Sun
 
Gilgamesh
-1
#110
Quote: Originally Posted by Musky View Post

Very true....but on the other hand what I said was valid as well.

Time will tell.

I agree however that this is a political play by the most disastrous, scandal ridden and corrupt government in Ontario's history.

You get no argument from me. The Wynn govt is so incompetent & corrupt that it seems like a bad dream.
 
Johnnny
#111
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

Rising minimum wages could speed up automation, labour leaders warn
Canadian Press

Yep.
 
spaminator
+1
#112
Ontario sheds 59,300 part-time jobs in January following $14 minimum wage
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
February 9, 2018
Updated:
February 9, 2018 10:04 PM EST
Nick Thompson, cook at the Black Tomato restaurant in Ottawa, works in the kitchen wearing a "wake up Ontario" slogan before the restaurant closes its doors due to a minimum wage increase.Jean Levac/Ottawa Citizen / Justin Tang/THE CANADIAN PRESS
By Aleksandra Sagan, THE CANADIAN PRESS
Ontario shed some 59,300 part-time jobs in January, the same month the province hiked minimum wage about 20% to $14 an hour — but experts say it may be too soon to know how much the two are correlated.
The province shed 50,900 jobs total from December 2017, according to the Statistics Canada report.
It gained approximately 8,500 full-time positions but lost roughly 59,300 part-time gigs, according to data provided by the agency, which noted the figures are rounded.
That means there was 3.4 per cent or 46,100 fewer part-time posts in January 2018 than the same time the previous year.
Some economists said it’s possible Ontario’s minimum wage increase played a role in those declines, but noted it’s important not to read too much into one month of data.
The province hiked minimum wage by $2.40 per hour to $14 per hour at the beginning of the year, a move some economists warned could result in mass job losses as employers look to reduce costs.
Overall, economists are divided on how minimum wage increases play out. Some research has suggested a reduction in hours or jobs follow mandated wage bumps, while other studies suggest no long-term connection between wage increases and dips in employment rates.
The 59,000 figure is a “whopping” one, said Matthieu Arseneau, senior economist at National Bank Financial Markets, in a note.
It “may be a sign of adjustments made by corporations coping with a minimum wage surge,” he said, noting young people ages 15 to 24 lost 24,000 part-time positions.
However, economists also pointed to possible connections between Ontario’s minimum wage and Canada’s stronger average wage growth of 3.3% in January. It’s the highest year-over-year increase since July 2015 when it rose 3.32%. The same increase — 3.31% — happened in March 2016 and November 2015.
“One of the positives in today’s release was the fact that wage growth picked up,” said Craig Alexander, chief economist at the Conference Board of Canada.
“Now part of that might be reflecting the increase in minimum wages in Ontario because that increase in minimum wage is impacting more than 20 per cent of all the workers in Ontario.”
Protesters gather outside a Tim Hortons location in Peterborough, Ont. on Wednesday January 10, 2018 in response to some franchisees scaling back benefits in response to a provincial minimum wage increase. (Clifford Skarstedt/Postmedia Network)
In the province, average hourly wage rates for permanent employees in January rose 3.19% from the same time last year.
While that is lower than the national number, the dollar amount of $27.83 in Ontario is higher than for all of Canada at $27.46 for January, said Gordon Song, an analyst with Statistics Canada, in an email.
Ontario’s mandatory minimum hourly rate is set for another bump in January 2019, when it will rise to $15.
B.C. to raise minimum wage to $15.20 per hour by June 2021 following moves by Alberta and Ontario
The province of British Columbia announced Thursday it too plans to raise rates for its lowest paid employees over several years.
It aims to reach at least $15.20 by June 2021. Its current minimum wage is set at $11.35 and will rise every June, starting this year when it moves to $12.65, until it reaches at least $15.20.
Some have already criticized the increase as being too fast, noting it may be difficult for small business owners to adapt to the increased labour costs.
Ontario sheds 59,300 part-time jobs in January following $14 minimum wage | Toronto Sun
 
Walter
+1
#113
No one predicted this.
Ontario sheds 59,300 part-time jobs in January following $14 minimum wage | Canoe
 
Hoid
#114
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

No one predicted this.
Ontario sheds 59,300 part-time jobs in January following $14 minimum wage | Canoe

???

Everyone predicted it Walter.
 
Walter
#115
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

???

Everyone predicted it Walter.

sarcasm: A tongue of which the user speaks of something the complete opposite of what the user means. It often has the best comedic value.
 
Hoid
-2
#116
Oh I get it now. You were actually predicting a loss of part time jobs and a gain of full time jobs.

That was brilliant.

BTW Victoria's chamber of commerce has just determined that a $15 minimum wage will still be inadequate in the Capital region.

How are all these fat asses going to get their Starbucks every morning?
 
WLDB
+1
#117
At least it was only part time jobs lost.
 
Murphy
+1
#118
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

sarcasm: A tongue of which the user speaks of something the complete opposite of what the user means. It often has the best comedic value.

Hoid thinks that he can carry on a conversation with grown ups. It speaks poorly about the BC educational system. Have you noticed that he has an opinion on everything? He's ever correct. He never supports his statements. He fits the definition of a troll.

What a waste of skin.
 
pgs
+1
#119
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Oh I get it now. You were actually predicting a loss of part time jobs and a gain of full time jobs.

That was brilliant.

BTW Victoria's chamber of commerce has just determined that a $15 minimum wage will still be inadequate in the Capital region.

How are all these fat asses going to get their Starbucks every morning?

Brilliant I am sure you will find the same anywhere . But most people don’t aspire to a minimum wage job as a career .
 
JLM
+1
#120
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Oh I get it now. You were actually predicting a loss of part time jobs and a gain of full time jobs.

That was brilliant.

BTW Victoria's chamber of commerce has just determined that a $15 minimum wage will still be inadequate in the Capital region.

How are all these fat asses going to get their Starbucks every morning?

I don't know how many times it has to be said, but the amount of minimum wage is irrelevant. It's the fact that it is the minimum wage and as long as that is what you are earning you will always be poor.
 

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