Legalized euthanasia- Good or Bad?


MHz
#91
Point 'B'
You need the map program but it is where it crosses the Cutbank River there is a skinny pit there too

Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

What happens with life insurance?

Mine or the guests that come onto the place for some extreme sports and never leave kind of thing. I'm pretty sure that is covered in the 4 page waiver that basically says, 'Have fun, while it lasts.' and then some small decal from your insurance agent/ Team of Lawyers. The on the zip lines make sure the HA comes from a big case of the willies sign for and not the ones that come as the whole zip lines crashes to the ground around you in no flames as steel doesn't burn. I'm going to assume black ink is going to be the favorite color for obvious reasons that is reserved for guests of the 11teenth floor. (That would be at the top of the 11 story high 60 ft silo with the clear dome that is at the stopping location. The reason you stop right there is in the winter the valley to the north is at -30 and if a Chinook is coming it will hit that spot first and then you are at 0. The view from there has long sunsets because the mountains block the sun out before it is very low in the sky so the graduations takes more than an hour, good reason to be above tree height and below is the VR testing room for days when the trails are muddy (other days it is a paying kind of ride 30 miles from the nearest town, so sleeping in your car or tent is part of the admission price. Bear proofing would probably be my 'list to do things'
In theory the body could be left to the site if it came from a long ways off. If mass starvation is facing the planet I doubt the 'whee factory' will be much of a hit.
It's still big enough and remote enough that it would qualify for growing hemp and no fencing would be needed, lots of custom dozer work available though. The first area and the one when you jump across the Smokey are similar in design. The one on the other side is over a sand/gravel pit that is huge in area but only averages out to be 1 meter or less in depth. That is perfect as all you want to do is move it around inside a border so it suits your needs. Moving is an improvement so you can tax all of that in while you make a lot of all weather packed sand trails through a variety of trails over land. The ones that want to do the 10k on water can use the cat to peel back the moss during a frosty winter and the boaters will figure out the rest. A swamp trail is wave proof also as the moss stops the the 60mph wind from causing a ripple if it is a cross wind. Some of the better sites are also 'islands' of various sizes. Winter is the time to move in the heavy stuff and then the roads are high speed, just slippery.
This exile stuff isn't as bad as it's made out to be.
 
mentalfloss
#92
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

That benefit was acknowledged in the O.P. but that is just one of several pertinent points- I also don't want to see people who aren't in pain or near the end of life "buying the farm".

I don't know what that means.
 
JLM
#93
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

I don't know what that means.

dying.
 
MHz
#94
legally
 
Sal
+1
#95
Quote: Originally Posted by bluebyrd35 View Post

It is only making legal what has been going on for years. Those on dialysis with no donors on the horizon because of age or other reasons have the right to refuse treatment. They die within a day or so by simply shutting down dialysis. Anyone can refuse to undergo cancer treatments or refuse other sorts of treatments that are keeping them alive.......What is the reason for allowing those for whom no such treatments that are available to relieve a life of pain and suffering...... for refusing the same relief?? We treat animals better than that!! Why do humans feel that suffering should not be relieved??

At least humans are able to request relief. It seems other dumb animals are refusing to listen to the needs of those who cannot relieve their own suffering.!!

well from what I've heard, for some people it has something to do with god wanting us to suffer and not interfering with his will which supposedly we are incapable of understanding. I get confused by that rational because if we are incapable of understanding his will why do they think they know his will.

What it really means is " I know what is best for you and you are going to do it my way" And " we are going to make laws to do it my way and we are going to punish people who help you fulfill your personal choice if it is different from the choice I know you should make."
 
SLM
+1
#96
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

That benefit was acknowledged in the O.P. but that is just one of several pertinent points- I also don't want to see people who aren't in pain or near the end of life "buying the farm".

So where do you think that's more likely to happen? In a system where end of life care includes termination of life, within the health care system, where there are things like medical records, consultations, and multiple people are likely involved? Or is it more likely to occur in a situation that kept quiet, outside the spotlight of society, in a dark corner somewhere?
 
Sal
+1
#97
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

I don't know what that means.

his fear is that if we legalize the right to die people will use it to kill other people that are inconvenient in their life...

which might be able to happen about one in how many million...but relieves the suffering of most of the rest of us...if someone is that close to death, a few days won't matter
 
JLM
#98
Quote: Originally Posted by bluebyrd35 View Post

It is only making legal what has been going on for years. Those on dialysis with no donors on the horizon because of age or other reasons have the right to refuse treatment. They die within a day or so by simply shutting down dialysis. Anyone can refuse to undergo cancer treatments or refuse other sorts of treatments that are keeping them alive.......What is the reason for allowing those for whom no such treatments that are available to relieve a life of pain and suffering...... for refusing the same relief?? We treat animals better than that!! Why do humans feel that suffering should not be relieved??

At least humans are able to request relief. It seems other dumb animals are refusing to listen to the needs of those who cannot relieve their own suffering.!!

I don't think most humans do. There's no doubt whatsoever there are situations where euthanasia is definitely the best course, where death is imminent and pain is unbearable.
 
Sal
+2
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I don't think most humans do. There's no doubt whatsoever there are situations where euthanasia is definitely the best course, where death is imminent and pain is unbearable.

agreed they "likely" don't but they take some personal experience of some relative who had a vicious disease and died relatively peacefully so now they think that is possible for everyone with every disease known to man

they have zero medical knowledge and zero understand of how pain killers work in the human body or of what various diseases do to the human body and have done zero research on it......but they know and

they want to force others to do it the way they would like

and now they are losing that control so they are angry and completely shut down to new information

too bad so sad for them because now, I can do it my way
 
bluebyrd35
#100
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

legally

Legally good I hope?
 
MHz
#101
Yes, assisted suicide by giving rides designed to 'test your limits' where you have many rides to choose from. With a straight set of train tracks why not get some engines from some dragsters and the customer sits in a sled that is firmly attached to the rails and is capable of recreating the g-force of whatever class of engine you are running. Mag-lev would give you the g-force but not the sounds and smell of an engine burning nitro fuel. For those there not wanting to 'bite the dust just yet' there would be 100's of miles of gentle trails.

Plus if you can't come up with some ways to make some coin of a place called 'Smokey Mountain' then the world has ended. It might even inspire some of the depressed to find a new direction before they kick the bucket.

Finding a PR firm that can turn many deaths in a weekend as reason to book early for the next one is on the 'to do list'. lol

The Last Ride Water Park and Crematorium something simple yet clear at the same time. Something that draws more, 'Oh's' than 'What??'
Last edited by MHz; Feb 8th, 2015 at 04:46 PM..
 
gopher
+2
#102
It should be up to the states to determine whatever legal standard they choose. I believe Oregon is the only state where this has been legal for some time. I'm sure that perhaps one or two more may have subsequently legalized it as well.

It's a tough decision to make. But whatever the case may be, it's best to have people make their own rational choice so long as it is an informed one.
 
tay
+1
#103
I'm actually mulling it over as well. Depending on how things go I would be wanting to donate what I can to help someone and I suppose that this process would insure ummmmmm quality.........
 
tay
#104
Province recording medically-assisted deaths as suicides is 'unconscionable,' says Sask. family

Province recording medically-assisted deaths as suicides is 'unconscionable,' says Sask. family - Saskatoon - CBC News
 
Danbones
#105
Don't legalize weed because it might hurt you, but legalize killing your self instead...
Hmmmm...O.K.

Then take away the old folks' pain meds...

That'll clear up some beds pretty quick... boomers will be in soon, gotta get ready for the rush... free up some pension money...
 
JLM
+1
#106
On a case by case basis. Based on two things..............unbearable pain that can't be managed and no chance of ever being cured or returned to manageable health.
 
TenPenny
+2
#107
There is a case for legalized euthanasia, much as there is a case for legalized abortion and legalized assisted suicide.


Hopefully, all of these decisions are not taken lightly.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
+1
#108
Funny how folks will take their dog or cat to the vet to have them humanely euthanized, but when it comes to people there is a morale or even religious dilemma. I support it, as long as the patient has a living will and the family agrees.
 
tay
+1
#109
I'll tell you that for the first time since July I'm actually anxious. I'm just not feeling well.

I'm on Chemo via pills and after my first round the Doctor said he was pleased with the blood tests. I then asked about what I should be planning for. I was too nervous to spit the word 'prognosis' out but he asked 'are you trying to ask what's your prognosis?' and I said yes.

And the reason I asked is that when I first met him he said he had a few patients like me and they were still going strong after a number of years.

He said if they can get rid of the 'brain spots' I will be okay.

I'm pretty effed up right now because there's only so much you can do and basically nothing on your own to help things along.

I have put it in my will to not be, well kept alive in a vegetative state, but I will contact my Insurance company to see if death benefits will be paid out if I go the euthanasia way......
 
Torch light
#110
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I've been mulling this over a lot and have come to the conclusion that there are up and down sides to it, but I don't agree that it's necessarily something to be ecstatic about. I see upsides, one it's going to eliminate a lot of suffering and two it's going to free up funds to treat treatable patients. On the downside, sooner of later there are going to be untimely deaths because of it. As we know from the news, mistakes are made in hospitals every day. Any other opinions?

Don't mull it over a lot: when you will be in such terminal illness, the euthanasia may be good for you; although I think when your hour of death comes it may happen so quickly.
Last edited by Torch light; Dec 21st, 2017 at 01:12 PM..
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
+3
#111
Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

I'll tell you that for the first time since July I'm actually anxious. I'm just not feeling well.

I'm on Chemo via pills and after my first round the Doctor said he was pleased with the blood tests. I then asked about what I should be planning for. I was too nervous to spit the word 'prognosis' out but he asked 'are you trying to ask what's your prognosis?' and I said yes.

And the reason I asked is that when I first met him he said he had a few patients like me and they were still going strong after a number of years.

He said if they can get rid of the 'brain spots' I will be okay.

I'm pretty effed up right now because there's only so much you can do and basically nothing on your own to help things along.

I have put it in my will to not be, well kept alive in a vegetative state, but I will contact my Insurance company to see if death benefits will be paid out if I go the euthanasia way......

I hope you get well, tay. I don't always agree with you, but I like you and I think that goes for a lot of folks on the forum.
 
bluebyrd35
#112
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

On a case by case basis. Based on two things..............unbearable pain that can't be managed and no chance of ever being cured or returned to manageable health.

Ah so....if someone with a disease that incapacitates them physically and mentally ...... and could live that way another 40 years as a vegetable, should not be given the choice of assisted suicide before they become totally incapacitated?? There are now many more people with Huntingdon's Chorea these days because many were of child bearing age before the first symptoms manifested The offspring of those people have a 50/50 % chance of acquiring that disease There is a test available these days that can determine if they are of the 50% who were unlucky enough to inherit the gene.

Do you feel they should not be given the option of terminating their lives before they lose the capacity to do so? I do.
 
taxslave
#113
Quote: Originally Posted by bluebyrd35 View Post

Ah so....if someone with a disease that incapacitates them physically and mentally ...... and could live that way another 40 years as a vegetable, should not be given the choice of assisted suicide before they become totally incapacitated?? There are now many more people with Huntingdon's Chorea these days because many were of child bearing age before the first symptoms manifested The offspring of those people have a 50/50 % chance of acquiring that disease There is a test available these days that can determine if they are of the 50% who were unlucky enough to inherit the gene.

Do you feel they should not be given the option of terminating their lives before they lose the capacity to do so? I do.

I think that is pretty much whatJLM just said.
 
bluebyrd35
#114
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

I think that is pretty much whatJLM just said.

Quote:- " where death is imminent and pain is unbearable." In many cases ....death is not imminent nor pain unbearable.....Huntingdon's Chorea is only one such. In many there is no imminent death and no pain.....just the prospect of having no one bodily home.
 
taxslave
#115
Quote: Originally Posted by bluebyrd35 View Post

Quote:- " where death is imminent and pain is unbearable." In many cases ....death is not imminent nor pain unbearable.....Huntingdon's Chorea is only one such. In many there is no imminent death and no pain.....just the prospect of having no one bodily home.

Your comprehension skills are none existant. Reread JLM's post until you understand it.
 
JLM
#116
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Line 'em up. Thousands die by the hands of their doctors every year. What's a few more?


Just a drop in the bucket compared to the ones they save, Cliffy. I never cease to be amazed by the quality of health care at V.J.H.
 
Curious Cdn
#117
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny View Post

There is a case for legalized euthanasia, much as there is a case for legalized abortion and legalized assisted suicide.


Hopefully, all of these decisions are not taken lightly.

My half sister (my father re-married near the end of his life) went to Switzerland and ended her life. She was in great pain with a degenerative condition with no possibility of improvement. She was also very much a grown-up. It was the right thing for her and therefore the right thing to do.
 
Danbones
#118
Yes and soon they will take away all or most of the LEGAL opiates and "ENDING IT" it will be the right thing to do for those with much less to trouble themselves with.

gotta move those beds
 
JLM
#119
Quote: Originally Posted by bluebyrd35 View Post

Do you feel they should not be given the option of terminating their lives before they lose the capacity to do so? I do.


No- you could be throwing away 10 or 20 years of useful and enjoyable life and besides, there's a chance there could be a cure by then. People who are not old and not suffering should not have the option of suicide!
 
Curious Cdn
#120
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

Yes and soon they will take away all or most of the LEGAL opiates and "ENDING IT" it will be the right thing to do for those with much less to trouble themselves with.

gotta move those beds

We can only hope that they start on Midland.
 

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