Sask may no longer legally fund non-Catholic students


Johnnny
#31
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Yes in QC in the 70's. Remember the fill in the dot CTBS tests?

I remember those tests... All the other ADD kids went into resource class after those testd but i was left with the neurotypical ones... Oh well
 
petros
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by Johnnny View Post

I remember those tests... All the other ADD kids went into resource class after those testd but i was left with the neurotypical ones... Oh well

Some were skipped.
 
Johnnny
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Some were skipped.

It happens :P
 
Curious Cdn
#34
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Yes in QC in the 70's. Remember the fill in the dot CTBS tests?

The Canadian Test of Basic Skills (CTBS) is a standardized test that is used by both private and public schools across Canada?

Remember?

I remember the SAT and SACU tests. I'm sure that I msypt have filled in those dots, way back when too.
 
petros
#35
Yup, you would have.

When the switch to Metric hit we got a dose of a Trudeau1 Fed mandated mathematics curriculum.

Standardized Provincial curriculums have been around for a long long time.
 
petros
#36
Metric = Science
 
Johnnny
#37
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Some were skipped.

You know whats funny is that i still did the neurotypical kids homework for them.
 
taxslave
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

What education system do you elect to apply your tax dollars towards?

... My bad, you don't pay taxes do you

BC. WE don't have such a thing. We have a grossly inefficient public system and a number of independent schools, some religious some not. I believe all receive the same per student funding. The government teachers union of course thinks that only public schools should be publicly funded. I think there is no excuse for having government employees as teachers. Like most government services this is a throwback to a bygone era.
 
Mokkajava
#39
As a Saskatchewan resident, and a parent member of boards that serve the public school system...I have been a spectator to the cuts to public school funding the current government has suggested need to occur, but legally they can not impose on the Catholic system. If any one else here followed the Parins report produced last fall, you will understand what I am referring to. I personally don't believe religious faith education should be publicly funded on any level... but I am particularly aggrieved when it receives special consideration and funding over Public education.
Call me a special snowflake or whatever... but I am happy with this ruling and hope it stands up under appeal. Take your children to church... practice your faith at home... and teach children in classes about the world and all its religions, but proper Education of all children need not include religious brainwashing.

Also, I went through the Catholic system in Saskatchewan myself... so I understand the implications.
 
tay
#40
Dear Mr. Wall; How you determine how many students are not Catholic is by asking them.............


Saskatchewan will look at all the options after a court ruling said the province can't provide Catholic schools funding for students who aren't Catholic, says Premier Brad Wall.

"This simply cannot stand," Wall said Monday.

"Consider the implications here. If this has to be implemented by June of 2018, in that subsequent fall, you could have massively overpopulated public schools and empty or near empty separate schools. You actually risk the viability of community schools."

Wall says parents could be forced to send their children to public schools an hour away from home, and that's not acceptable for families.

The dispute started in 2003 when the Yorkdale School Division, now Good Spirit School Division, closed down its kindergarten-to-Grade 8 school in the town of Theodore because of declining enrolment. The division planned to bus its 42 students to the community of Springside, 17 kilometres away.

In response, a local group created its own Catholic school division and opened St. Theodore Roman Catholic School.

That prompted Good Spirit School Division to launch a lawsuit claiming the creation of the new school division was not to serve Catholics in the community, but rather to prevent the students from being bused to a neighbouring town.

Layh's ruling noted there is a growing number of non-Catholic students attending Catholic schools in the province.

The Saskatchewan government does not know how many non-Catholic students attend Catholic schools.

"Can you imagine the process of trying to determine that?" said Wall.

Court ruling on funding for Catholic schools can't stand, Wall says | CTV News
 
tay
#41
In addition to using the notwithstanding clause, the Saskatchewan government is appealing Justice Donald Layh's ruling that it must stop paying for non-Catholic students to attend Catholic schools in the province.

The provincial government announced Wednesday that they will be filing a notice of appeal to the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal regarding last month's Court of Queen's Bench ruling on separate school funding.

"In doing so, I hope we get further clarification on this matter that is vitally important for Saskatchewan families," said Justice Minister and Attorney General Gordon Wyant in a press release.

On April 20, the Court of Queen's Bench ruled that Catholic schools could not receive provincial funding for non-Catholic students.

If it does stand, the ruling would affect about 10,000 students who would no longer be funded to attend Catholic schools, according to the government.

The government previously announced Saskatchewan will invoke the notwithstanding clause regarding the decision.

"We wanted to give students and their families the certainty that their ability to choose which school they attend will not be impacted by this decision," Minister of Education Don Morgan said in the release.

"Use of the notwithstanding cause will give parents that certainty, without having to worry about the outcome of an appeal."

The notwithstanding clause allows provinces to create laws that will operate in spite of (or "notwithstanding") some charter rights that the laws appear to violate, but the power is temporary, expiring after five years.

Saskatchewan government appealing ruling on Catholic school funding - Saskatchewan - CBC News
 
Musky
#42
Sask may no longer legally fund non-Catholic students?


Good.