Question about moving.

vinyl
#1
I'm planning on moving to Vancouver. I wanted to know to move, do I need a passport? I remember when I visited all I needed was a photo id (my driver's license) and my birth certificate.

so, is moving any different? Or will I need to have my passport?
 
GreenGreta
#2
You will need boxes and lots of tape. You will need newspaper to wrap your stuff in. You should rent a truck.

I'm just filling in for the Rev, cause you wont' get intelligent answers from him either.

Good luck in Vancouver.
 
Ocean Breeze
#3
where are ya moving FROM??? The U.S.?? Within Canada?? or overseas??
 
Jo Canadian
#4
Plastic shopping bags are useful for packing the fragile stuff also. Plus if you have them around you have a garbage bag readily accessable in case you want to throw stuff out while packing.
 
Reverend Blair
#5
You'll need a couple of friends with pick-up trucks and several cases of beer. It's not hard, but you should be able to patch holes in the wall and paint because you are depending on guys with pick-up trucks and you are paying them with beer.
 
Ocean Breeze
#6
ok.......just noticed your US flag. What part of the U.S are you coming from??? Are you coming to a job??? (or are you planning to look for work after you move??? )


the moving part is easy . Just hire a moving company....

(and as the rev says.........have plenty of beer around. )

(for YOU...... as moving rates hi on the stress meter.[/quote]
 
Reverend Blair
#7
If you are moving from the US, you need to immigrate. That means going through all of the official channels, getting all of the paperwork, and meeting all of the requirements. I suggest that you get a hold of you nearest Canadian Consulate and finding out what's required.

After that, you'll need some friends with pick-up trucks and plenty of beer...
 
Jo Canadian
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Reverend Blair

After that, you'll need some friends with pick-up trucks and plenty of beer...

I've done it with friends, a cube van and beer. Never EVER will do that again.
 
Ocean Breeze
#9
Quote:

If you are moving from the US, you need to immigrate. That means going through all of the official channels, getting all of the paperwork, and meeting all of the requirements. I suggest that you get a hold of you nearest Canadian Consulate and finding out what's required


absolutely ! all that has to be taken care of first. Some think they can just come here, move in and take up residence. ( a recent neighbor of mine from California did just that. She is gone now) Does not work that way. We do not tolerate illegals.... but some get away with it for a while anyhow.

Would NOT try that route...........
 
vinyl
#10
If i'm not mistaken you can stay in Canada for up to 6 months. I'm pretty sure that's enough time to get my paperwork and everything out the way while up there. I have a Canadian friend i'm rooming with who will help me with all of that.
 
vinyl
#11
And I also heard that you don't have to be a Canadian Citizen to live in Canada, I can keep my US citizenship.
 
vinyl
#12
I didn't ask about all of this in the first place, I just asked if I needed my passport to move, or can I use my photo id and birth certificate?
 
Ocean Breeze
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by vinyl

I didn't ask about all of this in the first place, I just asked if I needed my passport to move, or can I use my photo id and birth certificate?

maybe not........but it is quite apparent that you are relying on heresay info .......and not on facts. You might want to check out the CA immigration website for more factual information.

what you "hear" and heard is inaccurate.......and it is wisest to follow proper protocol. You need to do a LOT More reseach into the proper protocol to move to Ca than simply posing a question to a forum.......where people are not up to speed on the details...and will most likely just give you a "bad" time.
 
Nascar_James
#14
Be very careful on what you tell Canadian immigration authorities, Vinyl. Without any paperwork, your intent must be solely to visit (max. 6 months). However, if you should up with a US passport stamped at a Canadian Consulate in the US with a Canadian Immigration Visa, then you must tell them that your intent is to immigrate.

Once you are in Canada, correct ... you can adjust your status from visitor to resident, by filling out the paperwork, provided you have the proper sponsorship. If you were born in Canada or had a Canadian parent, you will not have a problem and in this case, you might even be able to get your Canadian Citizenship pretty quick. Not sure about the grandfather clause thou. Another relative may also be able to sponsor you. If you have no relatives and a friend wants to hire you for work, that may be another way to obtain sponsorship. There are many options, just visit a Canadian Consulate nearby before leaving to find out your options.

So you have two options. You may apply at you local consulate for a Canadian Immigration Visa and get on a waiting list. Beleive it or not, yes there are many Americans who move to Canada. Option two would be to drive to Canada and then fill out the paperwork and apply from within. You must remember to submit your paperwork within 6 months of arriving in Canada. Don't forget to ask Canadian Immigration to stamp your passport before you drive across the border. Many times they don't stamp the passport and this may cause problems for you later on. It is the only way to prove that you've submitted your paperwork within 6 months of entering Canada as a visitor. Remember, if you choose option two, do not tell Canadian Immigration that your intent is to stay. As an American Citizen, you have legal status in Canada as a visitor for 6 months.
 
vinyl
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Nascar_James

Be very careful on what you tell Canadian immigration authorities, Vinyl. Without any paperwork, your intent must be solely to visit (max. 6 months). However, if you should up with a US passport stamped at a Canadian Consulate in the US with a Canadian Immigration Visa, then you must tell them that your intent is to immigrate.

Once you are in Canada, correct ... you can adjust your status from visitor to resident, by filling out the paperwork, provided you have the proper sponsorship. If you were born in Canada or had a Canadian parent, you will not have a problem and in this case, you might even be able to get your Canadian Citizenship pretty quick. Not sure about the grandfather clause thou. Another relative may also be able to sponsor you. If you have no relatives and a friend wants to hire you for work, that may be another way to obtain sponsorship. There are many options, just visit a Canadian Consulate nearby before leaving to find out your options.

So you have two options. You may apply at you local consulate for a Canadian Immigration Visa and get on a waiting list. Beleive it or not, yes there are many Americans who move to Canada. Option two would be to drive to Canada and then fill out the paperwork and apply from within. You must remember to submit your paperwork within 6 months of arriving in Canada. Don't forget to ask Canadian Immigration to stamp your passport before you drive across the border. Many times they don't stamp the passport and this may cause problems for you later on. It is the only way to prove that you've submitted your paperwork within 6 months of entering Canada as a visitor. Remember, if you choose option two, do not tell Canadian Immigration that your intent is to stay. As an American Citizen, you have legal status in Canada as a visitor for 6 months.

Hrm, well. I wasn't driving to Canada. I was takeing a plane.
 
Ocean Breeze
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by vinyl

I didn't ask about all of this in the first place, I just asked if I needed my passport to move, or can I use my photo id and birth certificate?

so is your question about ENTERING Canada (border crossing ??) or MOVING to CA. ?? Either way........don't try anything illegal. or something that could be considered slippery slopes. Honesty is the best policy.

anyone that tries to cheat the system is NOT welcome here.... and sooner or later it is found out.....
 
vinyl
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Ocean Breeze

Quote: Originally Posted by vinyl

I didn't ask about all of this in the first place, I just asked if I needed my passport to move, or can I use my photo id and birth certificate?

so is your question about ENTERING Canada (border crossing ??) or MOVING to CA. ?? Either way........don't try anything illegal. or something that could be considered slippery slopes. Honesty is the best policy.

anyone that tries to cheat the system is NOT welcome here.... and sooner or later it is found out.....

Are you stupid? What the hell are you talking about? I'm not doing anything illegal, geez.
 
Ocean Breeze
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by vinyl

Quote: Originally Posted by Ocean Breeze

Quote: Originally Posted by vinyl

I didn't ask about all of this in the first place, I just asked if I needed my passport to move, or can I use my photo id and birth certificate?

so is your question about ENTERING Canada (border crossing ??) or MOVING to CA. ?? Either way........don't try anything illegal. or something that could be considered slippery slopes. Honesty is the best policy.

anyone that tries to cheat the system is NOT welcome here.... and sooner or later it is found out.....

Are you stupid? What the hell are you talking about? I'm not doing anything illegal, geez.


easy boy....... "attitude" is not appreciated in Vancouver.... and if you want to move here..........

and no one said you were doing /planning anything illegal. But your questions seem to bare the fact that you are not as informed about procedures as you should be.........and a forum like this is not the place for facts about such situations.
 
Summer
#19
Vinyl,

You can't just move to canada and stay with your friend and work, and THEN put in your paperwork. If you're going to just visit a friend for 6 months without working, sure, you can do that. But if you try to get a job without first having a work permit, that won't fly.

I'm currently planning a move from Cleveland to Toronto, so I've been doing my homework on all of this. Tell ya what, if you want to get some answers from some of the people I've been getting them from and you don't want to go to the CIC site and try to wade through all the stuff there by yourself (though I do recommend it eventually), try this forum:

Road To Canada

That forum is by, for, and all about people in various stages of moving to Canada. Some of them are from the U.S., and some are even in Canada already with temporary work permits but are in the process of seeking permanent resident status. You can read our various stories and get all sorts of useful information. You'll find me there under the same username as here.
 
wannabecanadian
#20
Hi Vinyl,

Yep, Summer is right--immigration is a complicated procedure and you're going to want to prepare yourself thoroughly before trying to just up move there. I'd recommend reading through the CIC website first (cic.gc.ca/english), then visiting us over at the Road to Canada site. Everyone there is really helpful and knowledgeable, but the specifics of it all will be found on the CIC site. Best of luck to you!
 
Twila
#21
Quote:

Are you stupid? What the hell are you talking about? I'm not doing anything illegal, geez.

This coming from the lad who thinks he just needs a passport to live here. sheesh! stay in the states...your safer there
 
GreenGreta
#22
Yes, we also like people who have a sense of humour.

Don't call Ocean stupid. We like her.
 
gatoraco
#23
I have read all the info and maybe you can help ME? I was born in Newfoundland in 66 and still have my birth certificate. I am a US citizen because I was adopted and forced to go South to the US in 68. I now want to go to Toronto to live and dont want the red tape or want to wait. I wish to "visit" and then find an apt and work. Advise please?
 
Reverend Blair
#24
You may have dual citizenship, gatorco. If you were born in Canada and have proof of that, then I'd suggest that you take your documentation to the nearest Canadian consulate and find out from them what the next step is.
 
gatoraco
#25
Well I called all of them and they all give me different info. One says "Oh! you need to resume citizenship!". While the next one says "Oh, you still are a citizen." See even the consulates dont know... I am so ready to just get my passport, and drive INTO Toronto as if I was a tourist, and go straight to the official offices and say, look, here I am, heres by birth cert, now what?
 
no1important
#26
If you were born in Canada you are a citizen. When you come back to Canada, just tell customs people you were born here in Canada and are moving back. Make sure you have ID like birth certificate to make things more smooth.
 
gatoraco
#27
Ya I got that, for sure! BUT what about all this talk on - oh if you were born and moved out of Canada before 1977 your "responsible" parent changed their citizenship,, blah, blah, my birth parents didnt change citizenship, my adopted parents were already US citizens... I'm totally confuzzed..
 
no1important
#28
Maybe go see an immigration lawyer or call Canada Immigration to find out.

Have you gone here? click me

Maybe send the above an email?

Resumption of Citizenship

The above link states:

As of May 5, 2005, people who lost their Canadian citizenship as minors between January 1, 1947, and February 14, 1977, can apply to resume their citizenship without having to become permanent residents and live in Canada for one year. The requirements concerning official language ability and knowledge of Canada also do not apply to these cases, but the people concerned must make an application and take the oath of citizenship.

The current Application for Resumption of Citizenship under subsection 11(1) of the Citizenship Act should be used until a new form becomes available.

To apply from within Canada, download and print an application or contact the CIC Call Centre.

To apply from outside of Canada, download and print an application or contact the nearest Canadian embassy, high commission or consulate.


They have forms for you to download at that link telling you how to apply etc and everything else you may need.
 
gatoraco
#29
Ok, so I should probably get into Canada, and I can appy within...?
 
gatoraco
#30
I can go there and say, Oh, Im on vacation

See the next page too...
 

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