Google Earth Shows 30 Years of Climate Change


mentalfloss
#1
Google Earth Shows 30 Years of Climate Change

Satellites have revolutionized the way we see the world. Since the first satellite image of earth was taken in 1959, they’ve captured a world reshaped by humans.

Cities have risen, lakes have dried out, ice shelves have disappeared and the future of energy has begun popping up in deserts and fields around the world. Human ingenuity put the satellites into orbit hundreds of miles above the earth to chronicle these changes. And now human ingenuity has strung together decades of images to crystalize what those changes look like in every corner of the globe.

Google has been collecting a database of imagery from the Landsat and Sentinel satellite systems that spans 1984 until the present. It’s part of a petabyte-scale database from our eyes in the sky (for reference, you’d need 31,250 iPhone 7s — the basic 32 gigabyte version — to store a single petabyte of data). Using their Earth Engine system, anyone with an internet connection can see those changes. Here are some of the starkest and most hopeful timelapses of our planet.

The Antarctic Peninsula protrudes from the continent like a crooked finger. As climate change has helped crank up the temperature there, it has led to the spectacular collapse of some of the previously stable ice shelves on its edges. The vivid images of the demise of the Larsen A and B ice shelves are clearly visible from space. Now scientists have seen worrying signs that Larsen C is likely entering its final days. When ice shelves collapse, they allow the ice sheets currently trapped on land to speed toward the ocean, driving sea levels higher around the world.

Once the fourth largest lake on earth, the Aral Sea (don’t let the name fool you, it’s a freshwater lake) has died a drawn out death at the hands of agriculture and drought. Farmers have been diverting water from the Central Asian lake for decades. From 1960 to 2010, the lake lost 88 percent of its area and 92 percent of its volume. A drought two years ago further expedited its transition into a dusty pit with a few puddles. More intense droughts fueled by climate change could only further serve to heighten water scarcity in Central Asia and elsewhere.

Boreal forests blanket much of Canada. But zooming into the northeast edge of Alberta reveals a growing disturbance in the undulating stands of spruce and pine trees. The region’s oil sands boom has given rise to a mining and refining operation that has mushroomed over the past 30 years. Pits, tailings ponds and refining equipment have helped create an enormous footprint in the forest. The result has been a steady rise in production that reached more than 2.5 million barrels of oil a day on average in 2015. The emissions from the mining operation as well as the oil it produces contribute directly to climate change as well as local environmental degradation.

..mo...


Google Earth Shows 30 Years of Climate Change | Climate Central
 
Curious Cdn
#2
Trump's gonna shut down all that NASA remote imaging, fire all the libtards there and solve this "global warming" myth for once and for all.

My President.

Gonna fix it!
 
Ludlow
#3
No it's a scam
 
taxslave
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Google Earth Shows 30 Years of Climate Change

Satellites have revolutionized the way we see the world. Since the first satellite image of earth was taken in 1959, they’ve captured a world reshaped by humans.

Cities have risen, lakes have dried out, ice shelves have disappeared and the future of energy has begun popping up in deserts and fields around the world. Human ingenuity put the satellites into orbit hundreds of miles above the earth to chronicle these changes. And now human ingenuity has strung together decades of images to crystalize what those changes look like in every corner of the globe.

Google has been collecting a database of imagery from the Landsat and Sentinel satellite systems that spans 1984 until the present. It’s part of a petabyte-scale database from our eyes in the sky (for reference, you’d need 31,250 iPhone 7s — the basic 32 gigabyte version — to store a single petabyte of data). Using their Earth Engine system, anyone with an internet connection can see those changes. Here are some of the starkest and most hopeful timelapses of our planet.

The Antarctic Peninsula protrudes from the continent like a crooked finger. As climate change has helped crank up the temperature there, it has led to the spectacular collapse of some of the previously stable ice shelves on its edges. The vivid images of the demise of the Larsen A and B ice shelves are clearly visible from space. Now scientists have seen worrying signs that Larsen C is likely entering its final days. When ice shelves collapse, they allow the ice sheets currently trapped on land to speed toward the ocean, driving sea levels higher around the world.

Once the fourth largest lake on earth, the Aral Sea (don’t let the name fool you, it’s a freshwater lake) has died a drawn out death at the hands of agriculture and drought. Farmers have been diverting water from the Central Asian lake for decades. From 1960 to 2010, the lake lost 88 percent of its area and 92 percent of its volume. A drought two years ago further expedited its transition into a dusty pit with a few puddles. More intense droughts fueled by climate change could only further serve to heighten water scarcity in Central Asia and elsewhere.

Boreal forests blanket much of Canada. But zooming into the northeast edge of Alberta reveals a growing disturbance in the undulating stands of spruce and pine trees. The region’s oil sands boom has given rise to a mining and refining operation that has mushroomed over the past 30 years. Pits, tailings ponds and refining equipment have helped create an enormous footprint in the forest. The result has been a steady rise in production that reached more than 2.5 million barrels of oil a day on average in 2015. The emissions from the mining operation as well as the oil it produces contribute directly to climate change as well as local environmental degradation.

..mo...


Google Earth Shows 30 Years of Climate Change | Climate Central

Quite the crock of sh!t. Must be scraping the bottom of the barrel for lies to support your cult.
 
mentalfloss
#5
That Google cult lol
 
Ludlow
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Quite the crock of sh!t. Must be scraping the bottom of the barrel for lies to support your cult.

thats right its a scam
 
petros
#7
None of image sets show anything caused by Climate Change and yet the title makes the claim.

How did that happen?
 
taxslave
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

That Google cult lol

Globull warming cult.
 
petros
#9
Landsat...

The Soviets sure built some cool space stuff during the Cold War.
 
DaSleeper
+1
#10  Top Rated Post
The believers will cling to anything!!!
 
petros
+1
#11
Or blatantly lie.
 
mentalfloss
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Globull warming cult.

Uh huh

Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Or blatantly lie.

 
Danbones
#13
...er...LEFT!
 
petros
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Right. "The Record" is damning evidence isn't it?
 
Curious Cdn
#15
... phonied up in the building next door to the sound stage where the moon landings were faked ..
 
MHz
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Ludlow View Post

No it's a scam

30 years that should be part of 30M years that needs to be studied.
 
Locutus
#17
dem cucks and their silly narrative.

trump has some questions for them soon.

 
petros
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

... phonied up in the building next door to the sound stage where the moon landings were faked ..

Who was keep tabs on global temperatures in 1880?
 
Danbones
#19
Captain Nemo
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#20
A lot of those show little change. The first and last antartic shot show very little difference. Deforistation and Oil Sands development and solar panel building are not climate change. The only remaining image is of the lake that dried up and that does happen from time to time. As proof, this is a big fail.
 

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