18th Century war heroine's hat sells for £5000


Blackleaf
#1
A traditional Welsh hat which may have once belonged to an 18th Century heroine has sold at auction for £5,000.

Jemima Nicholas, from Pembrokeshire, led a group of Welsh women to capture French soldiers who landed at Fishguard in 1797.

The item was donated to a charity auction to raise funds for the restoration of a local church.

Jemima Nicholas: Traditional Welsh hat sells for £5,000

25 August 2019
BBC News


Jemima Nicholas is said to have single-handedly rounded-up a dozen French troops

A traditional Welsh hat which may have once belonged to an 18th Century heroine has sold at auction for £5,000.

Jemima Nicholas, from Pembrokeshire, led a group of Welsh women to capture French soldiers who landed at Fishguard in 1797.

The item was donated to a charity auction to raise funds for the restoration of a local church.

Hywel Davies said the hat came to him through his mother as it had been passed down through her relatives.

"It was well known to be Jemima's hat, everybody knew of it as hers," Mr Davies told BBC Cymru Fyw.

An expert confirmed the hat was dated from about 1750, and "so few" from that time would have survived to the present day.


The hat sold at auction for £5,000

"It had spent years in a cupboard. I decided it would be a nice thing to give to the appeal, so it was nice that it was sold for £5,000."

The successful bid came from Denise Hutton, a distant relative of Jemima who had flown from Australia to make the purchase.

It is said Jemima tricked troops into surrender by telling local women to dress in traditional Welsh costume to look like British soldiers.

She is said to have single-handedly rounded-up a dozen French troops armed with only a pitchfork.


The hat has been passed down through the years to headteachers

Following the publicity from the auction, Alun Davies, a former head teacher at a Fishguard primary school, said a hat kept in the school at the time had been passed down for years.

"Every headmaster that had been in charge had been given the instruction from the previous head that this was Jemima Nicholas's hat," he said.

When the school moved site, the old building was cleared and Mr Davies' successor, Tim Owen, took the hat home for safekeeping.

"It's not in great condition," Mr Owen said. "I was told it had been used in a school concert in 1982, but since then it had just been in a cupboard."

He admitted that it would be difficult to know for certain if it was Jemima's original: "Nobody's quite sure, but this is the story that's been passed on."


The French invasion of Britain was halted by a woman


Jemima Nicholas died aged 82 in 1832 and her gravestone can be seen at St Mary's Church in Fishguard

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-49465390
 
Curious Cdn
#2
Cool!

Don't mess with a Welsh woman, eh?
 
Blackleaf
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Cool!
Don't mess with a Welsh woman, eh?

Well not if you're French.
 
Curious Cdn
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Well not if you're French.

The English are pretty close to being French. It was the court language of England for hundreds of years. The "English" who built all those massive castles in Wales to crush the Welsh were all babbling away in French.

English ... French ...what's the difference?
 
Blackleaf
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

. It was the court language of England for hundreds of years.

And Wales, too.

Quote:

The "English" who built all those massive castles in Wales to crush the Welsh were all babbling away in French.

But they weren't French or English. They were Normans.

Quote:

English ... French ...what's the difference?

Well one's a West Germanic language most closely related to Scots, Frisian and Low German and the other's a Romance language.
 
Curious Cdn
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

And Wales, too.
But they weren't French or English. They were Normans.
Well one's a West Germanic language most closely related to Scots, Frisian and Low German and the other's a Romance language.

The Welsh had no choice. The English are murderous thugs.

French is a lot closer to English than you think. Try speaking some German and you'll realize that it is pretty alien to English but French and English share all sorts of vocabulary.
 
Blackleaf
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

The Welsh had no choice. The English are murderous thugs.

Don't you mean the Normans were murderous thugs?

It was the Norman rulers of England who invaded Wales, not the English.


I hate how England's subjugation of Wales is blamed on the English.


People forget that the English were under Norman occupation at the time.

Quote:

French is a lot closer to English than you think. Try speaking some German and you'll realize that it is pretty alien to English but French and English share all sorts of vocabulary.

Absolute codswallop. English is a West Germanic language, with the vast majority of its most common words being Anglo-Saxon in origin.

The closest related languages to English are Scots and Frisian, two fellow West Germanic languages that are mutually intelligible with English.

English and French are not mutually intelligible.
 
Curious Cdn
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Don't you mean the Normans were murderous thugs?
It was the Norman rulers of England who invaded Wales, not the English.
I hate how England's subjugation of Wales is blamed on the English.
People forget that the English were under Norman occupation at the time.
Absolute codswallop. English is a West Germanic language, with the vast majority of its most common words being Anglo-Saxon in origin.
The closest related languages to English are Scots and Frisian, two fellow West Germanic languages that are mutually intelligible with English.
English and French are not mutually intelligible.

I speak quite a bit of French and sing a fair bit of High German and I will tell you that German is a really alien tongue but not French ... whatever your encyclopedia tells you. Learn a bit if each, then tell me that it's codswollop. German sentences aren't even structured like ours but French ones, are.
 
DaSleeper
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Don't you mean the Normans were murderous thugs?

It was the Norman rulers of England who invaded Wales, not the English.


I hate how England's subjugation of Wales is blamed on the English.


People forget that the English were under Norman occupation at the time.



Absolute codswallop. English is a West Germanic language, with the vast majority of its most common words being Anglo-Saxon in origin.

The closest related languages to English are Scots and Frisian, two fellow West Germanic languages that are mutually intelligible with English.

English and French are not mutually intelligible.

So many different dialects in London alone and you are crying about French?
When someone from north London can't understand someone from the south?
 
Blackleaf
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I speak quite a bit of French and sing a fair bit of High German and I will tell you that German is a really alien tongue but not French ... whatever your encyclopedia tells you. Learn a bit if each, then tell me that it's codswollop. German sentences aren't even structured like ours but French ones, are.

It is a fact that English is most closely related to Scots, Frisian, High German and Dutch.

It's so much of a fact you just need to use Google to see the truth.
 
Curious Cdn
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

It is a fact that English is most closely related to Scots, Frisian, High German and Dutch.
It's so much of a fact you just need to use Google to see the truth.

I understand all of that history in considerable depth but French is still easier for an Anglophone to speak ... by a long shot ... than German..


Google: Brits don't listen.
 
Blackleaf
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

So many different dialects in London alone and you are crying about French?

When someone from north London can't understand someone from the south?


It's amazing in Britain. Two places just five miles apart can have different accents. Here in Bolton, ten miles outside Manchester city centre, we have different accents to people who live in central Manchester.


Even further afield and accents become unintelligible. Someone from Devon could often, depending on how thick the accent, struggle to understand someone from the North East of England. English people often struggle to understand Scots. And yet some English people can understand Scots speaking Scots- a different language but so close to English they can be mutually intelligible.
 
Curious Cdn
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

So many different dialects in London alone and you are crying about French?
When someone from north London can't understand someone from the south?

I love their rhyming slang. The London word for an American is "Septic" ... which comes from "Tank" which rhymes with "Yank".

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=septic
 
Blackleaf
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I love their rhyming slang. The London word for an American is "Septic" ... which comes from "Tank" which rhymes with "Yank".
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=septic


I've got a Cockney Rhyming Slang dicionary.

"Loaf" is Cockney Rhyming Slang for "head."

"Don't be f&cking stupid, mate, use your loaf!"

The new series of Top Gear, presented by Paddy McGuiness (from here in Bolton), former cricketer Freddie Flintoff (from Preston, Lancashire) and Chris Harris (from Buckinghamshire) is being shown in subtitles in America so Yanks can understand what McGuiness and Flintoff are saying.
 

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