Mystery over mass grave of 86 skeletons in Wales


Blackleaf
#1
A mass grave of skeletons belonging to people from all over the world have been discovered buried beneath a Welsh college.

The remains of 86 people lay concealed in the ground for more than 1,600 years before they were unearthed during building work at Coleg Menai's Pencraig Campus in Angelsey.

Experts are now attempting to unravel the mystery surrounding the cemetery after they made peculiar findings about the bodies' age, gender and nationality.

Mystery over mass grave of 86 skeletons in Wales from just after Romans left Britain 1,600 years ago with more women than men found and people from as far away as Spain


Eighty-six skeletons have been found clustered beneath a Welsh college

Experts have discovered peculiar findings about their age, sex and nationality

They were likely buried in the early medieval period after the Romans left Britain


By Sophie Law and Luke Andrews For Mailonline
3 August 2019

A mass grave of skeletons belonging to people from all over the world have been discovered buried beneath a Welsh college.

The remains of 86 people lay concealed in the ground for more than 1,600 years before they were unearthed during building work at Coleg Menai's Pencraig Campus in Angelsey.

Experts are now attempting to unravel the mystery surrounding the cemetery after they made peculiar findings about the bodies' age, gender and nationality.


The remains of 86 people lay concealed in the ground for more than a thousand years before they were unearthed during building work at Coleg Menai's Pencraig Campus in Angelsey

Dating back to just after the Romans left Britain, archaeologists discovered that the human remains belonged to people who had come from all over Europe to lay to rest in rural Wales.

From Spain to Scandinavia, individuals would have had to travel a great distance before they were buried underneath the Welsh college.

Dr Irene Garcia Rovira told Wales Online: 'What we do know from the isotope analyses is that some individuals came from western Britain, where the border is today between England and Wales, a couple from Scandinavia and a couple from Mediterranean places like Spain.'

After studying the skeletons, Experts were puzzled to find the mass grave included more females than males.


Dating back almost 1,600 years, archaeologists discovered that the human remains belonged to people who had come from all over Europe to lay to rest in rural Wales

And they also discovered that the people had lived into their mid forties, which is considered to be relatively long for that period of time.

'It is old for the period, its a will lived life', Dr Rovira told the publication.

As many as 34 skeletons were found directly underneath college, when work on its 20million building programme began, while a further 54 were unearthed when a link road was built next to the college between the town and the A55.

The remains were discovered buried alongside Roman artifacts, including a 2nd century AD Roman coin as well as a Celtic brooch.


They also discovered that the people lived into their mid forties, which is considered to be relatively long for that period of time


The remains were discovered buried alongside Roman artifacts, including a 2nd century AD Roman coin as well as a Celtic brooch

Dr Rovira, said: 'It could be that it just happened to be on the soil at the time of the burial and fell into the grave, or it could have been purposely placed with her, as some sort of family hairloom.

The 4th to 8th century, around the time these skeletons are believed to have been buried, was a period of great political turmoil in Britain.

In AD410, faced with invaders on the continent, the Roman Emperor Honorius is said to have told Britain to 'look to its own defences'.

He pulled out the legions abandoning the island and leaving the romanised country in chaos.


Experts were puzzled to find the mass grave included more females than males


Angles, Saxons and Jutes then began landing along the coast, sailing over the North Sea, and by AD500 had penetrated deep into Britain.

There is likely to have been regular conflict as they competed with the Romano-British for land and resources.

It is also the time that the early medieval kingdoms of Mercia, Wessex and Northumbria, among others, begin to emerge.


A Roman coin was also found with the human remains which was found by archaeologists

Anglesey is said to have passed under the influence of Dublin and received Irish settlers, which are today evidenced in round house foundations left on the island.

Following a conflict with Irish rulers, however, according to traditional tales, the island is then said to have headed in its own direction.

Talking about the discovery, college CEO Dafydd Evans said it was 'extraordinary'.

'Once the experts have completed their work, the college will be working in partnership with Anglesey County Council so that these discoveries can be seen by the public at the nearby Oriel Ynys Mon gallery and museum,' he said.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...h-college.html
 
Curious Cdn
#2
I guess that someone decided to get even with some Roman colonists.

I have noticed that in Britain, a lot of the Roman sites are abandoned when they left. Some Towne survived, London, Colchester but for the most part, the Britons abandoned the Roman sites, eventually pulling them down for building materials but not using them in any way. In done instances, the Britons seem to have re-occupied some of their ancient hill forts.

What I read into this is that the Roman occupation of Britain was brutal from beginning to end and that the Britons loathed the Romans, all thevway through. I read somewhere that 80% of Rome's military assets were used at any given time to surpress just two of their 18 provinces ... Britain and Judea. Look want happened to the Judeans. That ethnic cleansing is still sending shock waves throughout the world. I propose throat the Roman occupation was do horrible, the natives wanted to erase as much of it from their land as was possible and those poor murdered people from all over Europe payed the price.
 
Blackleaf
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I guess that someone decided to get even with some Roman colonists.
I have noticed that in Britain, a lot of the Roman sites are abandoned when they left. Some Towne survived, London, Colchester but for the most part, the Britons abandoned the Roman sites, eventually pulling them down for building materials but not using them in any way. In done instances, the Britons seem to have re-occupied some of their ancient hill forts.

Yeah. Some Roman towns survive but many others were abandoned.

Even when the Anglo_Saxons arrived, they preferred to stay clear of Roman urban areas and set up their own towns instead. I think Bolton was founded by the Anglo_Saxons, its name coming from "bothl-tun", meaning a settlement with a dwelling.

Quote:

What I read into this is that the Roman occupation of Britain was brutal from beginning to end and that the Britons loathed the Romans, all thevway through.

Not all the Britons hated Roman rule. Some, like the Iceni tribe, did. But there were many Roman client kingdoms.

This all started when Caesar re-throned Mandubracius as King of the Trinobantes, who had been ousted by Cassivellaunus, who had probably been King of the Catuvellauni. Mandubracius then aided Caesar in his second invasion of Britain in 54BC. The Votadini were another client state. So, too, were the Iceni before King Prasutagus's death when they were allowed quasi-independence, but that changed upon his death when the Romans tried to seize back full control of the tribe and raped the daughters of Prasutagus and his wife Boudicca, which prompted Boudicca's angry revolt.

Quote:

I read somewhere that 80% of Rome's military assets were used at any given time to surpress just two of their 18 provinces ... Britain and Judea. Look want happened to the Judeans. That ethnic cleansing is still sending shock waves throughout the world. I propose throat the Roman occupation was do horrible, the natives wanted to erase as much of it from their land as was possible and those poor murdered people from all over Europe payed the price.

Well they were a troublesome lot to the Romans, were the Britons.

And unlike much of the rest of the former Western Roman Empire, Britons don't speak a Romance language, showing that they didn't largely speak Latin whilst under Roman rule.
 
Blackleaf
#4
AN interactive map shows where Romans occupied British towns nearly 2,000 years ago.

The tool lays Roman roads over modern maps of cities including Bath, London and Chester.

Created by Heritage Daily, it allows you to see how different Britain was during Roman occupation, which lasted from 43 to 410 AD.

By the end of the fourth century, 3.6million people lived in Britain. One in 30 were Roman soldiers and their families and dependants.

The military takeover was swift and ruthless, but brought with it many benefits for Britain.

Roman towns and roads formed part of vast urban planning projects that laid the foundations for the nation we know today.







https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/925986...-maps-britain/
 
Curious Cdn
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

AN interactive map shows where Romans occupied British towns nearly 2,000 years ago.
The tool lays Roman roads over modern maps of cities including Bath, London and Chester.
Created by Heritage Daily, it allows you to see how different Britain was during Roman occupation, which lasted from 43 to 410 AD.
By the end of the fourth century, 3.6million people lived in Britain. One in 30 were Roman soldiers and their families and dependants.
The military takeover was swift and ruthless, but brought with it many benefits for Britain.
Roman towns and roads formed part of vast urban planning projects that laid the foundations for the nation we know today.



https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/925986...-maps-britain/

A few Roman towns survived and grew but literally hundreds of them were abandoned almost immediately and before the Saxons and Scots invaded. That tells me that the Romans were loathed all over but the only written records from that period are Roman and therefore would not mention what the Britons really thought of them. The evidence suggests that anything Roman was poison.
 
Blackleaf
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

A few Roman towns survived and grew but literally hundreds of them were abandoned almost immediately and before the Saxons and Scots invaded. That tells me that the Romans were loathed all over but the only written records from that period are Roman and therefore would not mention what the Britons really thought of them. The evidence suggests that anything Roman was poison.

Many Britons enjoyed Roman rule. Because they grew wealthy out of it and built large villas for themselves.
 
Curious Cdn
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Many Britons enjoyed Roman rule. Because they grew wealthy out of it and built large villas for themselves.

Look where it is... Anglesey. The Romans killed everyone on Anglesey and Tacitus recorded the genocide.

Looks to me as if the Britons finally got even.
 
Blackleaf
#8
I've just noticed that Anglesey has been spelt wrong all the way through that article.
 
Cliffy
#9
The Brits love being lorded over.
 
Blackleaf
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

The Brits love being lorded over.

Oh yeah. That's why we vote for Brexit.