Olympic chat


Mowich
+2
#31
Apparently, for the first time in Olympic history, Canada currently leads in the medal count. Wahoosie.........Rock on Canada!
 
Blackleaf
+1
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

At the Olympic level there are no losers.

Apart from those who don't win.
 
Mowich
+3
#33


Dara Howell on the left won Gold in the Ladies Slopestyle Skiing Event and Kim Lamarre on the right took the Bronze for Canada. Rock on Ladies!

 
BornRuff
#34
DJ Khaled "All I Do Is Win" feat. Ludacris, Rick Ross, T-Pain & Snoop Dogg / Victory In Stores Now - YouTube
 
petros
#35
The more crap like this that comes out, the more l appreciate polkas.
 
coldstream
#36
Quote:


The tiny British island of Ailsa Craig,
located in the Firth of Clyde and measuring just over 219 acres, provides the
world with curling stones. The island's granite has been used to make curling
stones - curling is a Scottish sport - since the 19th Century and still is
today. Around 70% of all the world's curling stones today were once part of
Ailsa Craig


That's interesting.. i was unaware of that.. and a bit surprising since Canada contains the largest exposed precambrian granite rock mass in the world.. the Canadian Shield.. but i suppose there is a unique consistency of quartz, mica and felspar that make the Ailsa Craig Rock special.

Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Apparently, for the first time in Olympic history, Canada currently leads in the medal count. Wahoosie.........Rock on Canada!


It'd be difficult to outdo Vancouver in winning the most Golds.. and outdo the Norwegians in Cross Country Skiing of the Dutch in Speedskating.. there are some events that i always focus on.. Individual Figure Skating.. 4 Man Bobsled.. Alpine Skiing.. (all of which are dominated by the Europeans of Americans)... but there is Curling (about the only time i watch the sport).. and of course.. there's that Hockey thing.
 
Goober
+6
#37
Canada again demonstrates grace and understanding. Man done good. Made Canada proud
Sochi 2014 - CBC Sports - Canadian cross-country coach Justin Wadsworth lends ski to Russian skier

Justin Wadsworth may be the head coach of the Canadian cross-country team, but that doesn’t mean he won’t help a rival skier in need.

When Russia’s Anton Gafarov crashed and broke a ski during a semifinal heat in the men’s cross-country sprint, Wadsworth was right there to help.

Gafarov was clearly out of the race, but still wanted to finish in front of the home crowd. But his ski was too badly damaged in the crash and he took another tumble into the snow.

That’s when Wadsworth went to help. The Canadian coach ran onto the slope, spare ski in hand, and quickly fastened it to Gafarov’s boot, drawing a cheer from the crowd.

"It's kind of like seeing an animal in a trap," Wadsworth said. "I just couldn't let him sit there."

Though the Russian was three minutes behind his competitors, he still finished the race thanks to the Canadian coach’s help.

It brought back memories of the 2006 Olympics in Torino, when Norwegian coach Bjornar Haakensmoen helped out Canadian cross-country skier Sara Renner in the team sprint event. Renner broke her ski pole halfway through the race, and Haakensmoen provided her with a new one.

Ironically, the move prevented Norway from winning a medal in the event, as Renner and Beckie Scott won silver, while the Norwegians finished in fourth. As a token of their appreciation, fans across Canada donated five tonnes of maple syrup to Haakensmoen as a thank you gift.
 
Sal
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by Goober View Post

Canada again demonstrates grace and understanding. Man done good. Made Canada proud
Sochi 2014 - CBC Sports - Canadian cross-country coach Justin Wadsworth lends ski to Russian skier

Justin Wadsworth may be the head coach of the Canadian cross-country team, but that doesn’t mean he won’t help a rival skier in need.

When Russia’s Anton Gafarov crashed and broke a ski during a semifinal heat in the men’s cross-country sprint, Wadsworth was right there to help.

Gafarov was clearly out of the race, but still wanted to finish in front of the home crowd. But his ski was too badly damaged in the crash and he took another tumble into the snow.

That’s when Wadsworth went to help. The Canadian coach ran onto the slope, spare ski in hand, and quickly fastened it to Gafarov’s boot, drawing a cheer from the crowd.

"It's kind of like seeing an animal in a trap," Wadsworth said. "I just couldn't let him sit there."

Though the Russian was three minutes behind his competitors, he still finished the race thanks to the Canadian coach’s help.

It brought back memories of the 2006 Olympics in Torino, when Norwegian coach Bjornar Haakensmoen helped out Canadian cross-country skier Sara Renner in the team sprint event. Renner broke her ski pole halfway through the race, and Haakensmoen provided her with a new one.

Ironically, the move prevented Norway from winning a medal in the event, as Renner and Beckie Scott won silver, while the Norwegians finished in fourth. As a token of their appreciation, fans across Canada donated five tonnes of maple syrup to Haakensmoen as a thank you gift.

I heard about this today. How absolutely awesome!!! I was so proud when I heard, it was the right thing to do ♦
 
Mowich
+3
#39
Quote: Originally Posted by Sal View Post

I heard about this today. How absolutely awesome!!! I was so proud when I heard, it was the right thing to do ♦

When Justin Wadsworth was interviewed by CTV, he told the reporter that he wanted to see the Russian skier finish the race, in front the hometown fans, with some dignity. Great examples by both men of the spirit of the Olympic Games.
 
JLM
+1
#40
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

When Justin Wadsworth was interviewed by CTV, he told the reporter that he wanted to see the Russian skier finish the race, in front the hometown fans, with some dignity. Great examples by both men of the spirit of the Olympic Games.

Yep, I was "moved" when I saw that on Global News tonight.
 
tay
+1
#41
Came across this story which I found the Canadian appreciation' amusing but don't remember it happening.............








April 12, 2006






Bjoernar Haakensmoen's act of sportsmanship was rewarded Wednesday - with more than five tons of Canadian maple syrup.


At the Turin Olympics, the Norwegian cross-country ski coach handed Sara Renner a spare ski pole after the Canadian broke one during the Nordic ski sprint relay final. Renner went on to win a silver medal while the Norwegians finished fourth.


"It was natural for me to do it, and I think anyone should have done it," Haakensmoen told The Associated Press. "I didn't think about it. It was just a reflex ... but the response has been unbelievable."


After the Olympics, Haakensmoen became famous in Canada, and grateful fans started Project Maple Syrup. Canadians were asked to make donations or bring their own cans of maple syrup to one of 300 participating Bell Canada phone stores.


The result: 7,400 cans were purchased and sent to Norway, the Canadian embassy in Oslo said in a statement.



The 5.2 tons of maple syrup was given to Haakensmoen at a ceremony Wednesday.


"In the eyes of Canadians, we took a silver medal, but Norway has won gold for sportsmanship," Geoff Snow, of Waterford, Ont., wrote in an e-mail to the Oslo newspaper Aftenposten.


Haakensmoen said he was stunned by the response.


"When you get this kind of response it is, well, just enormous," said Haakensmoen, who recently stepped down as sports director for the Norwegian skiers.


Norway and Canada agreed to waive any import duties, which might have made the tons of syrup too expensive for Haakensmoen to accept.


Maple syrup is little known in Norway, and the 37-year-old Haakensmoen said he recently tasted it for the first time.


"It's sweet, and a little unusual," he said. "We might have it from time to time, but not five times a day."


Even the Norwegian ambassador in Ottawa thought it was a great idea to send the pancake topper to his country.


"It is not a common product in Norway ... perhaps it's the best thing you can send to Norwegians," Tor Naess said.


Naess received more than 400 e-mails from Canadians expressing their thanks for the ski pole.


"I am surprised, for a Norwegian it was quite natural to hand over the pole, like we did there," Naess said. "What is surprising is that we have so much positive reaction on the Canadian side."




Cross Country Canada - Norweigan coach honoured for sportsmanship
 
spaminator
#42
they should have tie breakers.
 
Goober
+1
#43
Another example of making the best decision, for the team and the Country.
Classy Junio surrenders spot in 1,000 metres to Canadian teammate Morrison - The Globe and Mail

Denny Morrison is a man burning for redemption in the 1,000-metre race on the long track. And now, much to his surprise, he’ll get the chance.

Canada’s top male long-track speed skater wasn’t supposed to take part in the race at the Sochi Winter Games. In a disastrous turn of events during Olympic qualifying, Morrison fell on the last lap in Calgary, scuttling his chance at that distance.

But in a move that shows just how tightly knit the Canadian speed-skating team has become in Sochi, up-and-comer Gilmore Junio said Tuesday he was surrendering his spot in the 1,000 metres, allowing to Morrison to take the ice Wednesday, in what is one of his specialty distances.

“How Denny is skating now, I believe it’s in the best interest of the team if he races,” Junio said. “To represent Canada at the Olympics is a huge honour and privilege, but I believe that as Canadians, we’re not just here to compete; we are here to win.

“Denny has proven to be a consistent medal threat in the distance.”

It’s a classy move by the 23-year-old from Calgary who is at his first Olympics. Junio skated to a 10th-place finish in the 500-metre sprints last Monday, and is considered one of Canadian speed skating’s future stars.

“Denny and I are made of the same fabric – we both want to win and represent our country at a level that reflects that passion,” he said.

Canadian speed-skating team leader Sean Ireland said Junio told him after the 500 sprint he wanted to cede his spot to Morrison.

Morrison, 28, called Junio a great teammate: “This is an amazing gesture and I’m ready to make the most of this opportunity.” Morrison also took to Twitter to publicly thank Junio for the opportunity to skate the 1,000 metres.

The move adds some compelling drama to the event for Canadians. Morrison is aching to capture the one thing that eluded him in such heartbreaking fashion four years ago – an individual medal.

A podium finish seemed almost guaranteed, with Morrison arriving at the 2010 Vancouver Games as one of the world’s top-ranked skaters. But strangely, inexplicably, the Fort St. John, B.C., native fell short.

Even Morrison couldn’t explain what went wrong. “I kind of fell apart,” he seethed after placing a distant 13th in the 1,000.

A few days later, Morrison channelled his frustration into a stunning gold medal in the team pursuit event for Canada. But he still burns for success in the individual events.

For a skater who has been one of the country’s best on the world stage for the past six years, his mission to Sochi is one last chance to confront unfinished work.

Morrison arrived at the Canadian selection camp last December needing to skate strongly in the 1,000 and 1,500 to make the team. Then, the fall happened, and it took a strong 1,500-metre run a few days later to secure a spot for Sochi.

Those few days were “right up there with some of the most challenging competitions – mentally – of my life,” Morrison said. “Right up there with the Olympics in Vancouver.”

One thing about Morrison – he’s never lacked a flair for the dramatic. If there’s a silver lining this time around in Sochi, it’s possibly that he has gotten the drama out of the way before the Olympics begin.

“Speed skating is a pretty exciting sport in that way,” he quipped, referring to the suspense he injected into his bid for Sochi.

For all the sport’s simplicity, something he’s learned over the years is just when you think you have everything figured out, things change. At his first Games in Turin in 2006, Morrison won silver in the team pursuit at 20 – and the future seemed golden.

“I came out of Torino thinking, ‘Okay … I get it now. I’ve been to an Olympics,’” Morrison said. “And something different happened in Vancouver. Now, four years after Vancouver, it’s an entirely different experience.”

In addition being a late addition for Wednesday’s 1,000, he’ll also skate the 1,500-metres on Saturday, as well as the team pursuit.

The man to beat, as it was in Vancouver, is Morrison’s good friend and former training partner Shani Davis of the United States. A four-time Olympic medalist, Davis has ruled the World Cup circuit this season.
 
El Barto
+1
#44
Agosta scores!!!!!! 3 1 Canada over the US , 5 min to go
 
petros
#45
3-2 now.

YAY for the ladies!!!!
 
El Barto
+1
#46
oh man what a finish !!!! Never think the Americans are out of the game when you have the lead.... I think I sweated as much as the girls did last 2 minutes of that game ....3 2 Canada ....
 
petros
#47
The Agosta penalty had me worried.
 
El Barto
+1
#48
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The Agosta penalty had me worried.

but 2 goals
 
petros
#49
And it's her birthday.
 
El Barto
+1
#50
Happy B Day Meaghan!!!!
 
petros
#51
Another silver.....

Denny Morrison 1000m
 
JLM
+1
#52
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Another silver.....

Denny Morrison 1000m

Looks like the Krauts got ahead of us. H.T.F. did that happen? Gotta respect them Norvegians, per capita they are miles ahead of everyone.
 
El Barto
+4
#53
I am hearing of some awesome stories of generosity and courage from our athletes.
The last silver medalist in speed skating to Morrison. He was given the chance by replacing another Canadian skater... I wish I grasped his name.
We have a down hill skier who got the sponsors hers self to go to the Olympics because Canada thought it wasn't worth it , she did finish 12 th but her determination was exemplarily.
The freestyle skier that won bronze earlier had two knee surgeries.
We had another skier who dislocated her shoulder and still continued the next event .
There seems to be depth in character of our athletes, not to forget the Canadian instructor who gave his ski to the Russian .
The mogul silver medalist who said about the gold medalist , if it wasn't for him I wouldn't have made it this far.


Medals are nice but hats off to our ambassadors, you make us proud
 
JLM
#54
Quote: Originally Posted by El Barto View Post

I am hearing of some awesome stories of generosity and courage from our athletes.
The last silver medalist in speed skating to Morrison. He was given the chance by replacing another Canadian skater... I wish I grasped his name.
We have a down hill skier who got the sponsors hers self to go to the Olympics because Canada thought it wasn't worth it , she did finish 12 th but her determination was exemplarily.
The freestyle skier that won bronze earlier had two knee surgeries.
We had another skier who dislocated her shoulder and still continued the next event .
There seems to be depth in character of our athletes, not to forget the Canadian instructor who gave his ski to the Russian .
The mogul silver medalist who said about the gold medalist , if it wasn't for him I wouldn't have made it this far.


Medals are nice but hats off to our ambassadors, you make us proud

Athletics is more than a test of physical ability, it's also a test of patience, determination and character.
 
talloola
+1
#55
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Athletics is more than a test of physical ability, it's also a test of patience, determination and character.

sports teaches people, from a very early age how to handle 'all' aspects
of life, another one is 'respect' for your fellow competetor.
 
coldstream
+2
#56
I'm glad the Russians won the Pairs in Figure Skating (and the Silver).. imho.. it is the most dramatic and theatrical of all Winter Olympic events.. and i think close to the Russian soul as well with their love of classical ballet. They have been perennial powers in the discipline.. and this was a well deserved win (Tatiana Volosozhar and Maxim Trankov for the Gold and Ksenia Stolbova and Fedor Klimov for the Silver).

Canada does well too, but not quite as consistently (5th and 7th in Sochi).. something in the vast northern vistas and its artistic expression i suppose.
Last edited by coldstream; Feb 12th, 2014 at 02:54 PM..
 
JLM
#57
Quote: Originally Posted by talloola View Post

sports teaches people, from a very early age how to handle 'all' aspects
of life, another one is 'respect' for your fellow competetor.

Sometimes, I don't think that bowler who kicks the ball return when all the pins don't fall down, got that message yet. I think I may mention it sometime soon. -
 
talloola
#58
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Sometimes, I don't think that bowler who kicks the ball return when all the pins don't fall down, got that message yet. I think I may mention it sometime soon. -

those types stand out like sore thumbs, many times the problem hAs directly been handed down from one
or both of the parents, who also behaved like dim wits, and the child inherited the genetics, and
was not ever corrected.
some go through their whole lives with that attitude, they just never get it, and often become entangled
in other situations where they can't control their emotions/temper.
 
JLM
#59
Quote: Originally Posted by talloola View Post

those types stand out like sore thumbs, many times the problem hAs directly been handed down from one
or both of the parents, who also behaved like dim wits, and the child inherited the genetics, and
was not ever corrected.
some go through their whole lives with that attitude, they just never get it, and often become entangled
in other situations where they can't control their emotions/temper.

You can say that again, many years ago when one of my kids was in junior hockey the wife and I used to attend all his games. I'd say the behaviour of a good 1/3 of the parents was absolutely deplorable, challenging the refs, ordering the coaches around............."my Johnny is going to the N.H.L. and I think he should play centre and he should get more minutes blah, blah, blah" Like these were 8-9 years old and couldn't care less about anything other than having fun at the game they were playing. One parent was going to assault the statistician because she made a mistake in tallying up the points. Kids didn't even know was going on. Just plain childish.
 
talloola
+2
#60
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

You can say that again, many years ago when one of my kids was in junior hockey the wife and I used to attend all his games. I'd say the behaviour of a good 1/3 of the parents was absolutely deplorable, challenging the refs, ordering the coaches around............."my Johnny is going to the N.H.L. and I think he should play centre and he should get more minutes blah, blah, blah" Like these were 8-9 years old and couldn't care less about anything other than having fun at the game they were playing. One parent was going to assault the statistician because she made a mistake in tallying up the points. Kids didn't even know was going on. Just plain childish.

our daughters played high quality ice hockey, had a nice league with teams all over the lower mainland.
one sunday, when we were watching our game, a boys team came in to get ready for their ice time after
our game ended.
one of the boys mothers came to me and said "these girls shouldn't be allowed to take ice time that our
boys could have, after all our boys are trying to get to the nhl, and those girls can't go anywhere.
i looked at her and said "your attitude is a good reason your son will never get to the nhl", the
closed mind of this woman was pitiful.
 

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