Federal Carbon Price established at $10 a tonne in 2018, rising to $50 by 2022


mentalfloss
#1
Liberal carbon price at $10 a tonne in 2018, rising to $50 by 2022

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the federal Liberal government will establish a "floor price" on carbon pollution of $10 a tonne in 2018, rising to $50 a tonne by 2022.

Trudeau is making the announcement as he kicks off a debate in the House of Commons over whether Canada should ratify the Paris accord on climate change.

He says provinces and territories will have the option of either putting a direct price on carbon — a carbon tax — or implementing a cap-and-trade system "stringent enough" to meet or exceed the federal target.

The news also comes as provincial environment ministers meet in Montreal with federal counterpart Catherine McKenna to hash out an agreement over carbon pricing.

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall has consistently maintained that his province cannot currently afford a carbon tax, a point reiterated today by his environment minister Scott Moe.

And Yukon enviroment minister Currie Dixon said the three northern territories all object to the plan as well.

More Coming

The Canadian Press

NewsAlert: Liberal carbon price at $10 a tonne in 2018, rising to $50 by 2022 | National Newswatch
 
Walter
+6 / -2
#2  Top Rated Post
The blind leading the blind. Those of us who can see just shake our heads in pity for our children.
 
Nick Danger
-2
#3
Carbon taxes, more than anything else are a tool to get the public used to the idea that producing GHGs comes with a price. The fact that there is still an element that denies the effects of GHGs while wedging their fat behinds behind the wheels of their gas-guzzler for a three block drive to the grocery store is fast losing any measure of relevance in this debate. There will always be a degree of resistance for any measure that dips into our wallets, in this case the the magnitude of that resistance is directly proportional to the belief that our current lifestyle is having no effect on the environment.

The smart people are already working on reducing their carbon footprint, the rest are having another cigarette.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+4
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Nick Danger View Post

Carbon taxes, more than anything else are a tool to get the public used to the idea that producing GHGs comes with a price. The fact that there is still an element that denies the effects of GHGs while wedging their fat behinds behind the wheels of their gas-guzzler for a three block drive to the grocery store is fast losing any measure of relevance in this debate. There will always be a degree of resistance for any measure that dips into our wallets, in this case the the magnitude of that resistance is directly proportional to the belief that our current lifestyle is having no effect on the environment.

The smart people are already working on reducing their carbon footprint, the rest are having another cigarette.

Nobody who is preaching about a carbon tax is reducing their carbon footprint. And the government has discovered that while people dislike being taxed more, because they are already overtaxed, the people seem to not object when a tax grab to cover revenue shortfalls and gross overspending has the word carbon in front likely because it will be safely hidden from the public's view.
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
+3
#5
Its a silly feel good policy as it will do nothing to reduce the global carbon output. I not against the carbon tax as much as I'm against lying politicians. Taxing me and telling me it's about climate change is just like sending me a photo radar tax and telling me it's about road safety. Anybody with a clue and without a political agenda knows better
 
mentalfloss
-2
#6
It makes sense.

People cannot change so a tax needs to be introduced.
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

It makes sense.

People cannot change so a tax needs to be introduced.

Why? You believe a tax will help with climate change?
 
mentalfloss
+1 / -2
#8
No need to believe.

It already happened in BC and it made their economy better.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+2
#9
How much did it actually help the environment? Given our miniscule amount of carbon Canada actually produces, not much.


(Note I do not agree with your assessment on BC economy).
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
+2
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

No need to believe.

It already happened in BC and it made their economy better.

Global emissions are down because of BCs carbon tax and it helped their economy? Why don't they just keep increasing their tax? Global climate issue has been solved. Thank you BC
 
bobnoorduyn
Free Thinker
+2 / -1
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

It makes sense.

People cannot change so a tax needs to be introduced.


Social engineering by any other name, yup, governments have been doing that for centuries. Thinking folks grudgingly pay for what the useful idiots champion.

Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Why? You believe a tax will help with climate change?


Anyone who believes that has their head up their ****. The co founder of Greenpeace and the founder of the Weather Channel, both scientists by the way, among others, convincingly argue that the anthropogenic climate change hype is just that and totally unfounded, Even more, many liken it to the ideology that lead to the disaster of the US's 18th amendment, you know the one, prohibition, that allowed organized crime to not only take hold but to flourish.
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by bobnoorduyn View Post

Social engineering by any other name, yup, governments have been doing that for centuries. Thinking folks grudgingly pay for what the useful idiots champion.




Anyone who believes that has their head up their ****. The co founder of Greenpeace and the founder of the Weather Channel, both scientists by the way, among others, convincingly argue that the anthropogenic climate change hype is just that and totally unfounded, Even more, many liken it to the ideology that lead to the disaster of the US's 18th amendment, you know the one, prohibition, that allowed organized crime to not only take hold but to flourish.

I have no opinion one way or the other on global warming/climate change. The topic doesn't interest me in the least. That said, I'm a problem solver and "if" MF is suggesting that taxing BC residents is reducing GHG emissions, thereby solving the climate change issue...and the economy of BC is doing quite well with this tax, why aren't the people of BC asking for more? Seems to me it would be a no-brainer it things are as MF suggests.
 
Walter
-1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Seems to me it would be a no-brainer it things are as MF suggests.

Analfloss has been wrong on every thread he has ever begun on this site.
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

No need to believe.

It already happened in BC and it made their economy better.

The carbon tax scam most certainly did not help B.C.'s economy. If anything it has hindered our ability to attract investment.
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Analfloss has been wrong on every thread he has ever begun on this site.

I'll give him the benefit of doubt. If global CO2 is declining because of BC's tax and things are wonderful in BC, the folks in La La land should be screaming for more
 
Curious Cdn
No Party Affiliation
#16
$10 a tonne in 2018


So ... how much more tax are they going to collect from me, now?
 
bobnoorduyn
Free Thinker
+1
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

I'll give him the benefit of doubt. If global CO2 is declining because of BC's tax and things are wonderful in BC, the folks in La La land should be screaming for more


No doubt some already are, but here's a newsflash; we already have a de facto carbon tax, check out what portion of the price at the pump is tax, royalties and other such sundries, however we will never know what the government take is on natural gas or heating oil. Joe Clark introduced a gasoline tax in his first budget to fight the deficit and debt brought on by Trudeau номер один, we know how that turned out for him. After defeating Joke Lark's minority, Trudeau, now with a majority, went on to increase gasoline taxes to the point where prices exceeded $1.00/gal, and the pump prices only went to $.999. I worked pumping gas at the time so I remember well.


The point is, a tax increase on a tangible commodity is obviously hard enough to swallow, I simply cannot understand how a tax on something as intangible as carbon emissions can not only be palatable, but be actually supported, or championed. This is an ideological cost to consumers for a solution in search of a problem that will only have the effect of enriching few at the expense of many. If anyone thinks developing nations, or even developed ones like China, undoubtedly the largest polluters, are going to be on board certainly have another think coming. We are just being taken as saps.

Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

<b>

$10 a tonne in 2018
</b>



So ... how much more tax are they going to collect from me, now?


Kinda my point, you have no way of knowing or knowing if they are being honest, (well I guess that pretty much answers itself). I will bet it will be more than they are telling you now.
 
mentalfloss
#18
Fresh off the press for everyone to read in the next few days.

Enjoy!


How British Columbia Enacted the Most Effective Carbon Tax in North America

Suppose that you live in Vancouver and you drive a car to work. Naturally, you have to get gas regularly. When you stop at the pump, you may see a notice like the one below, explaining that part of the price you're paying is, in effect, due to the cost of carbon. That's because in 2008, the government of British Columbia decided to impose a tax on greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels, enacting what has been called "the most significant carbon tax in the Western Hemisphere by far."

A carbon tax is just what it sounds like: The BC government levies a fee, currently 30 Canadian dollars, for every metric ton of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions resulting from the burning of various fuels, including gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and, of course, coal. That amount is then included in the price you pay at the pump—for gasoline, it's 6.67 cents per liter (about 25 cents per gallon)—or on your home heating bill, or wherever else the tax applies. (Canadian dollars are currently worth about 89 American cents).

If the goal was to reduce global warming pollution, then the BC carbon tax totally works. Since its passage, gasoline use in British Columbia has plummeted, declining seven times as much as might be expected from an equivalent rise in the market price of gas, according to a recent study by two researchers at the University of Ottawa. That's apparently because the tax hasn't just had an economic effect: It has also helped change the culture of energy use in BC. "I think it really increased the awareness about climate change and the need for carbon reduction, just because it was a daily, weekly thing that you saw," says Merran Smith, the head of Clean Energy Canada. "It made climate action real to people."

It also saved many of them a lot of money. Sure, the tax may cost you if you drive your car a great deal, or if you have high home gas heating costs. But it also gives you the opportunity to save a lot of money if you change your habits, for instance by driving less or buying a more fuel-efficient vehicle. That's because the tax is designed to be "revenue neutral"—the money it raises goes right back to citizens in the form of tax breaks. Overall, the tax has brought in some $5 billion in revenue so far, and more than $3 billion has then been returned in the form of business tax cuts, along with over $1 billion in personal tax breaks, and nearly $1 billion in low-income tax credits (to protect those for whom rising fuel costs could mean the greatest economic hardship). According to the BC Ministry of Finance, for individuals who earn up to $122,000, income tax rates in the province are now Canada's lowest.

How British Columbia Enacted the Most Effective Carbon Tax in North America - CityLab
 
bobnoorduyn
Free Thinker
+1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Fresh off the press for everyone to read in the next few days.

Enjoy!


How British Columbia Enacted the Most Effective Carbon Tax in North America

Suppose that you live in Vancouver and you drive a car to work. Naturally, you have to get gas regularly. When you stop at the pump, you may see a notice like the one below, explaining that part of the price you're paying is, in effect, due to the cost of carbon. That's because in 2008, the government of British Columbia decided to impose a tax on greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels, enacting what has been called "the most significant carbon tax in the Western Hemisphere by far."

A carbon tax is just what it sounds like: The BC government levies a fee, currently 30 Canadian dollars, for every metric ton of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions resulting from the burning of various fuels, including gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and, of course, coal. That amount is then included in the price you pay at the pump—for gasoline, it's 6.67 cents per liter (about 25 cents per gallon)—or on your home heating bill, or wherever else the tax applies. (Canadian dollars are currently worth about 89 American cents).

If the goal was to reduce global warming pollution, then the BC carbon tax totally works. Since its passage, gasoline use in British Columbia has plummeted, declining seven times as much as might be expected from an equivalent rise in the market price of gas, according to a recent study by two researchers at the University of Ottawa. That's apparently because the tax hasn't just had an economic effect: It has also helped change the culture of energy use in BC. "I think it really increased the awareness about climate change and the need for carbon reduction, just because it was a daily, weekly thing that you saw," says Merran Smith, the head of Clean Energy Canada. "It made climate action real to people."

It also saved many of them a lot of money. Sure, the tax may cost you if you drive your car a great deal, or if you have high home gas heating costs. But it also gives you the opportunity to save a lot of money if you change your habits, for instance by driving less or buying a more fuel-efficient vehicle. That's because the tax is designed to be "revenue neutral"—the money it raises goes right back to citizens in the form of tax breaks. Overall, the tax has brought in some $5 billion in revenue so far, and more than $3 billion has then been returned in the form of business tax cuts, along with over $1 billion in personal tax breaks, and nearly $1 billion in low-income tax credits (to protect those for whom rising fuel costs could mean the greatest economic hardship). According to the BC Ministry of Finance, for individuals who earn up to $122,000, income tax rates in the province are now Canada's lowest.

How British Columbia Enacted the Most Effective Carbon Tax in North America - CityLab


Still selling snake oil and using tax policy for social engineering. Considering Canada contributes at most 1.6 % of all carbon emissions worldwide you're taxing a fellow for urinating in Lake Ontario while Montreal pumps millions of gallons of raw sewage into the St Laurence for free. Makes perfect sense to some I guess.
 
Nick Danger
+1
#20
You guys don't have to like the tax, hell you don't even have to understand the principal behind it. You just have to pay it.
 
MHz
#21
Cut use by 75% would be the easy solution. Off-grid 12 vdc would be the basic power and you can go up or down from there as required. Producing the voltage would be from a variety of on-site solutions. Including rolling big rocks down a hill and capturing the energy for use in the winter months.
 
Cannuck
No Party Affiliation
+2
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Fresh off the press for everyone to read in the next few days.

Enjoy!


How British Columbia Enacted the Most Effective Carbon Tax in North America

Suppose that you live in Vancouver and you drive a car to work. Naturally, you have to get gas regularly. When you stop at the pump, you may see a notice like the one below, explaining that part of the price you're paying is, in effect, due to the cost of carbon. That's because in 2008, the government of British Columbia decided to impose a tax on greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels, enacting what has been called "the most significant carbon tax in the Western Hemisphere by far."

A carbon tax is just what it sounds like: The BC government levies a fee, currently 30 Canadian dollars, for every metric ton of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions resulting from the burning of various fuels, including gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and, of course, coal. That amount is then included in the price you pay at the pump—for gasoline, it's 6.67 cents per liter (about 25 cents per gallon)—or on your home heating bill, or wherever else the tax applies. (Canadian dollars are currently worth about 89 American cents).

If the goal was to reduce global warming pollution, then the BC carbon tax totally works. Since its passage, gasoline use in British Columbia has plummeted, declining seven times as much as might be expected from an equivalent rise in the market price of gas, according to a recent study by two researchers at the University of Ottawa. That's apparently because the tax hasn't just had an economic effect: It has also helped change the culture of energy use in BC. "I think it really increased the awareness about climate change and the need for carbon reduction, just because it was a daily, weekly thing that you saw," says Merran Smith, the head of Clean Energy Canada. "It made climate action real to people."

It also saved many of them a lot of money. Sure, the tax may cost you if you drive your car a great deal, or if you have high home gas heating costs. But it also gives you the opportunity to save a lot of money if you change your habits, for instance by driving less or buying a more fuel-efficient vehicle. That's because the tax is designed to be "revenue neutral"—the money it raises goes right back to citizens in the form of tax breaks. Overall, the tax has brought in some $5 billion in revenue so far, and more than $3 billion has then been returned in the form of business tax cuts, along with over $1 billion in personal tax breaks, and nearly $1 billion in low-income tax credits (to protect those for whom rising fuel costs could mean the greatest economic hardship). According to the BC Ministry of Finance, for individuals who earn up to $122,000, income tax rates in the province are now Canada's lowest.

How British Columbia Enacted the Most Effective Carbon Tax in North America - CityLab

But you can't consider something "effective" without explaining what it is you are trying to do. Since the problem is climate change, you are suggesting that this is having an affect on climate change. How?
 
darkbeaver
Republican
+2
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

No need to believe.

It already happened in BC and it made their economy better.

You are a lot crazier than I am.

Your constant and steadfast defence of global warming means you will eventually freeze to death. I had a dream.
 
10larry
+1
#24
If it is revenue neutral how does carbon free energy get funding to make fossil fuels obsolete? Pay at the pump and get an offsetting tax credit leaves no profit for government or windmill fabricators, rev neutral.....unadulterated bs.
If a consumer pay scheme doesn't stuff elitist and gov coffers gov is not interested, too bad junior learned nothing from the eu mess that created quite a few billionaires before the carbon market tanked.
Will air canada and westjet add a carbon component to their ticket price I wonder, china and india refused to play the carbon game with brussels leaving the tax in limbo, can foreign nations be forced to take part in an eu or ottawa trading scheme?
 
Walter
+2 / -1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by 10larry View Post

If it is revenue neutral how does carbon free energy get funding to make fossil fuels obsolete? Pay at the pump and get an offsetting tax credit leaves no profit for government or windmill fabricators, rev neutral.....unadulterated bs.
If a consumer pay scheme doesn't stuff elitist and gov coffers gov is not interested, too bad junior learned nothing from the eu mess that created quite a few billionaires before the carbon market tanked.
Will air canada and westjet add a carbon component to their ticket price I wonder, china and india refused to play the carbon game with brussels leaving the tax in limbo, can foreign nations be forced to take part in an eu or ottawa trading scheme?

Shut-up, shut-up, shut-up. Facts bother the left.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
+1
#26
Carbon neutral is the same as death, you can,t be neutral about your carbon unless you are an idiot.
 
Queb
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by bobnoorduyn View Post

while Montreal pumps millions of gallons of raw sewage into the St Laurence for free. Makes perfect sense to some I guess.


and Toronto, Halifax, Winnipeg, Victoria, .....


Quote:

5. ET AILLEURS?

La Ville de Montréal a rejeté à quelques reprises de très grandes quantités usées dans le fleuve en raison de travaux dans le même égout collecteur sud-est.

  • Printemps 2003 : 10,5 milliards de litres ont été déversés.
  • Automne 2003 : 7,6 milliards de litres ont été déversés.
  • Automne 2005 : 770 millions de litres ont été déversés.
Cette pratique se fait aussi ailleurs au pays. À Toronto, en juillet 2013, de fortes précipitations ont causé le déversement d'un milliard de litres d'eaux usées dans le lac Ontario.

À Halifax, en Nouvelle-Écosse, il n'y a pas eu d'usine de traitement des eaux usées avant 2008.

À Winnipeg, au Manitoba, 185 millions de litres d'eaux usées ont été déversés dans les rivières Rouge et Assiniboine depuis 2004. Il en coûterait 4 milliards de dollars pour régler le problème, et la Ville n'a pas de plan global avant 2017.

Quant à Victoria, en Colombie-Britannique, les déversements d'eaux usées s'élèvent à 130 millions de litres par jour, soit 44,5 milliards de litres par année. Il n'y a pas de solution en vue avant 2020.

 
darkbeaver
Republican
+1
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Queb View Post

and Toronto, Halifax, Winnipeg, Victoria, .....

Pumping our waste into the deep, the deep is very deep, will our waste fill the eternal waste reduction equiupment, not rfukkin likely, whatever you eat you should be looking to the next age,forward thinking ,forward is the hard bit, trust is a point of view, have a nice time deciding
 
Bar Sinister
No Party Affiliation
-2
#29
No big surprise there. Waiting for the provinces to get their act together would be like waiting for the next ice age. What the Liberals are doing is what Harper should have done, but didn't due to the close connections of the Conservatives with big oil.

Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Shut-up, shut-up, shut-up. Facts bother the left.

Not nearly as much as they bother the right. - Or you.

Quote: Originally Posted by 10larry View Post

If it is revenue neutral how does carbon free energy get funding to make fossil fuels obsolete? Pay at the pump and get an offsetting tax credit leaves no profit for government or windmill fabricators, rev neutral.....unadulterated bs.
If a consumer pay scheme doesn't stuff elitist and gov coffers gov is not interested, too bad junior learned nothing from the eu mess that created quite a few billionaires before the carbon market tanked.
Will air canada and westjet add a carbon component to their ticket price I wonder, china and india refused to play the carbon game with brussels leaving the tax in limbo, can foreign nations be forced to take part in an eu or ottawa trading scheme?


Many foreign nations already have the equivalent of carbon taxes. All you have to do is check out what price motorists in various nations pay for a liter of gasoline. Gasoline prices around the world, 03-Oct-2016 | GlobalPetrolPrices.com
 
Curious Cdn
No Party Affiliation
+3 / -1
#30
A new and creative way of raising revenues ...