Lava flows from Philippine volcano as thousands flee — explosive eruption possible


spaminator
+2
#1  Top Rated Post
Lava flows from Philippine volcano as thousands flee — explosive eruption possible
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
January 15, 2018
Updated:
January 15, 2018 1:05 PM EST
LEGAZPI, Philippines — Nearly 15,000 people have fled from villages around the Philippines’ most active volcano as lava flowed down its crater Monday in a gentle eruption that scientists warned could turn explosive.
The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology increased the alert level for Mount Mayon late Sunday to three on a scale of five, indicating an increased prospect of a hazardous eruption “within weeks or even days.”
Lava flowed at least half a kilometre (less than half a mile) down a gulley from the crater on Monday morning and ash clouds appeared mid-slope as lava fragments rolled down, said Renato Solidum, who heads the volcano institute. It was hard to track down the lava flow given the thick clouds shrouding the volcano.
Molten rocks and lava at Mayon’s crater lit the night sky Sunday in a reddish-orange glow despite the thick cloud cover, leaving spectators awed but sending thousands of residents into evacuation shelters.
Residents ride on the back of a truck as they are evacuated to a temporary shelter due to Mayon volcano’s eruption in Camalig town, Albay province, south of Manila on January 15, 2018. CHARISM SAYAT/AFP/Getty Images
Disaster-response officials said more than 14,700 people have been moved from high-risk areas in three cities and four towns in an ongoing evacuation. People in the danger area have put up huge white crosses in the past in their neighbourhoods, hoping to protect their lives and homes.
“There are some who still resist but if we reach alert level four, we’ll really be obligated to resort to forced evacuation,” Cedric Daep, an Albay emergency official, told The Associated Press. Level four signifies the volcano could erupt violently within days.
Mayon lies in coconut-growing Albay province about 340 kilometres (210 miles) southeast of Manila.
The glow (at top) of lava from the cloud-covered Mayon volcano as it erupts is pictured from the Philippine city of Legazpi in Albay province, early on January 15, 2018. SIMVALE SAYAT/AFP/Getty Images
Three steam-explosions since Saturday have spewed ash into nearby villages and may have breached solidified lava plugging the crater and caused lava to start gushing out, Solidum said.
With its near-perfect cone, Mayon is popular with climbers and tourists but has erupted about 50 times in the last 500 years, sometimes violently.
In 2013, an ash eruption killed five climbers, including three Germans, who had ventured near the summit despite warnings of possible danger.
Experts fear a major eruption could trigger pyroclastic flows — superheated gas and volcanic debris that race down the slopes at high speeds, incinerating or vaporizing everything in their path. More extensive explosions of ash could drift toward nearby towns and cities, including Legazpi city, the provincial capital, about nine miles (15 kilometres) away.
In this image made from video, dark pyroclastic ash cloud rises from Mayon volcano after its eruption as seen from Legazpi city, Albay province, around 340 kilometers (200 miles) southeast of Manila, Philippines, Monday, Jan. 15, 2018. (Earl Recamunda/AP Photo)
The bulletin sent Sunday night said a hazardous eruption was possible within weeks or even days. It said the glow in the crater signified the growth of a new lava dome and that the evacuation zone should be enforced due to the dangers of falling rocks, landslides or a collapse of the dome.
Airplanes have been warned not to fly close to the volcano.
Mayon’s first recorded eruption was in 1616. The most destructive in 1814 killed 1,200 people and buried the town of Cagsawa in volcanic mud. The belfry of a Cagsawa church juts out of the ground in a reminder of Mayon’s deadly fury and has become a tourist attraction.
Associated Press writer Jim Gomez contributed to this report.

Lava flows from Philippine volcano as thousands flee

Glowing red lava rolls down slopes of Philippine volcano
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
January 15, 2018
Updated:
January 15, 2018 9:35 PM EST
Lava cascades down the slopes of Mayon volcano as seen from Legazpi city, Albay province, around 340 kilometers (210 miles) southeast of Manila, Philippines, Monday, Jan. 15, 2018. More than 9,000 people have evacuated the area around the Philippines' most active volcano as lava flowed down its crater Monday in a gentle eruption that scientists warned could turn explosive.Earl Recamunda / AP
LEGAZPI, Philippines — Glowing red lava rolled down the slopes of a Philippine volcano Tuesday morning as authorities maintained a warning of a possible hazardous eruption.
The lava was quietly flowing in some places but at times Mount Mayon was erupting like a fountain, the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology said. Lava had advanced up to 2 kilometres from the crater, and ash reached up to 2 kilometres and fell on nearby communities.
Nearly 15,000 people have fled the danger zone within 6 to 7 kilometres of Mayon, and the institute strongly advised people not to re-enter the area.
Several small pyroclastic flows were generated by fragments in the lava streams and not by an explosion from the crater vent, like occurred with Mount Pinatubo, said Renato Solidum, who heads the volcano institute. Pyroclastic flows are superheated gas and volcanic debris that can race down slopes and incinerate everything in their path, and are feared in a major eruption.
“The pyroclastic flows, there were several, were not generated by an explosion from the crater with lava, molten rocks and steam, shooting up the volcano then rolling down,” Solidum said. “These were generated by lava fragments breaking off from the lava flow in the upper slopes.”
He also said Mayon has not seen enough volcanic earthquakes of the type that would prompt scientists to raise the alert level to four, which would indicate an explosive eruption may be imminent. Emergency response officials previously said they may have to undertake forced evacuations if the alert is raised to four.
After steam explosions Saturday and lava rising in the crater on Sunday, the alert was raised to three on a scale of five, indicating a hazardous eruption is possible “within weeks or even days.”
Mayon lies in coconut-growing Albay province about 340 kilometres southeast of Manila. With its near-perfect cone, Mayon is popular with climbers and tourists but has erupted about 50 times in the last 500 years, sometimes violently.
Lava continues to cascade down the slopes of Mayon volcano as seen from Legazpi city, Albay province, around 340 kilometers (210 miles) southeast of Manila, Philippines, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018. Glowing red lava was rolling down the slopes of a Philippine volcano as authorities maintain a warning of a possible hazardous eruption.
In 2013, an ash eruption killed five climbers who had ventured near the summit despite warnings. Mayon’s first recorded eruption was in 1616 and the most destructive in 1814 killed 1,200 people and buried the town of Cagsawa in volcanic mud.
The Philippines lies in the so-called “Ring of Fire,” a line of seismic faults surrounding the Pacific Ocean where earthquakes and volcanic activity are common.
In 1991, Mount Pinatubo in the northern Philippines exploded in one of the biggest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century, killing about 800 people.

http://twitter.com/i/videos/tweet/952935217873895425
Glowing red lava rolls down slopes of Philippine volcano | Toronto Sun
 
taxslave
+2
#2
Does Philippenes have a carbon tax yet?
 
Cannuck
#3
I blame big pharma for this
 
captain morgan
+2
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Does Philippenes have a carbon tax yet?

All of that dangerous carbon and ghgs.

I weep for the children
 
Johnnny
+1
#5
It's a diarrhea volcano so the people have time.
 
Curious Cdn
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Johnnny View Post

It's a diarrhea volcano so the people have time.

Ummmmm ...


Dioritic, maybe?
 
B00Mer
#7
OMG Virgin Mobile won’t have any telephone customer service reps that you can’t understand because of their squeaky annoying voice.. what will I ever do

Please Volcano level the country
 
petros
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Johnnny View Post

It's a diarrhea volcano so the people have time.

That's funny.

Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

OMG Virgin Mobile won’t have any telephone customer service reps that you can’t understand because of their squeaky annoying voice.. what will I ever do

Please Volcano level the country

That is not bery nice sir.
 
spaminator
#9
Philippine volcano erupts in massive explosion as villagers flee
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
January 22, 2018
Updated:
January 22, 2018 12:01 PM EST
MANILA, Philippines — The Philippines’ most active volcano ejected a huge column of lava fragments, ash and smoke in a thunderous explosion Monday, sending thousands of villagers back to evacuation centres and prompting a warning that a violent eruption may be imminent.
The midday explosion sent superheated lava, molten rocks and steam between 3.5 to 5 kilometres (2 to 3 miles) into the blue sky, and then some cascaded down Mount Mayon’s slopes and shrouded nearby villages in darkness, Renato Solidum of the Philippine Institute of Seismology and Volcanology and other officials said.
A huge column of ash shoots up to the sky during the eruption of Mayon volcano Monday, Jan. 22, 2018 as seen from Daraga township, Legazpi city, Albay province, around 340 kilometers (200 miles) southeast of Manila, Philippines. (AP Photo/Dan Amaranto)
From the crater, the deadly debris billowed about three kilometres (1.8 miles) down on the southern plank of Mayon toward a no-entry danger zone. There were no immediate reports of deaths or injuries, officials said.
The explosion was the most powerful since the volcano started acting up more than a week ago.
Thousands Filipino Volcanic Eruption
Due to its relatively gentle eruption last week, thousands left emergency shelters and returned to their communities in Legazpi city outside the danger zone. But Monday’s blast sent nearly 12,000 fleeing back to evacuation centres, raising the number of people in those shelters to more than 30,000, Yucot said.
A huge column of ash shoots up to the sky during the eruption of Mayon volcano Monday, Jan. 22, 2018 as seen from Legazpi city, Albay province, around 340 kilometers (200 miles) southeast of Manila, Philippines. (AP Photo/Earl Recamunda)
Authorities on Monday raised the alert level to four on a scale of five, which means an explosive eruption is possible within hours or days. A danger zone around Mayon was expanded to 8 kilometres (5 miles) from the crater, which means thousands of villagers will have to leave their homes, officials said.
Airplanes were ordered to stay away from the crater and ash-laden winds and several flights were cancelled.
Residents, wearing masks, go on their daily business as Mayon volcano’s eruption plunge some townships in darkness Monday, Jan. 22, 2018 in Legazpi city, Albay province, around 340 kilometers (200 miles) southeast of Manila, Philippines. (AP Photo/Dan Amaranto)
Volcanic ash fell in about a dozen towns in coconut-growing Albay province, where Mayon lies, and in nearby Camarines Sur province, with visibility being heavily obscured in a few towns because of the thick grey ash fall, Jukes Nunez, an Albay provincial disaster response officer, said by telephone.
“It was like night time at noon, there was zero visibility in some areas because the ash fall was so thick,” Nunez said.
A driver cleans ash from the windshield of his bus after Mount Mayon shot up a giant mushroom-shaped cloud as it continues to erupt in Ligao town, near Legazpi City in Albay province, south of Manila on January 22, 2018. CHARISM SAYAT/AFP/Getty Images
More than 30,000 ash masks and about 5,000 sacks of rice, along with medicine, water and other supplies, were being sent to evacuation centres, Office of Civil Defence regional director Claudio Yucot said.
Mayon lies about 340 kilometres (210 miles) southeast of Manila. With its near-perfect cone, it is popular with climbers and tourists but has erupted about 50 times in the last 500 years, sometimes violently.
In 2013, an ash eruption killed five climbers who had ventured near the summit despite warnings. Mayon’s first recorded eruption was in 1616 and the most destructive, in 1814, killed more than 1,200 people and buried the town of Cagsawa in volcanic mud. The belfry of Cagsawa’s stone church still juts out from the ground in an eerie reminder of Mayon’s fury.
The Philippines lies in the “Ring of Fire,” a line of seismic faults surrounding the Pacific Ocean where earthquakes and volcanic activity are common.
In 1991, Mount Pinatubo in the northern Philippines exploded in one of the biggest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century, killing about 800 people.

Philippine volcano erupts in massive explosion as villagers flee | Toronto Sun
 
Danbones
+1
#10
Well now, there is some real man maid glowball warming...

*couph! couph!*



nothing new under the sun
 
spaminator
#11
12 people injured by flying rocks while skiing on Japanese volcano
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
January 23, 2018
Updated:
January 23, 2018 10:19 AM EST
Ashes from Mount Kusatsu-Shirane cover near its summit after its eruption in Kusatsu, Gunma prefecture, central Japan, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018.Suo Takekuma / Kyodo News via AP
TOKYO — Twelve people, including eight soldiers, skiing on the slopes of a volcano near a famous hot spring resort in central Japan were injured Tuesday by flying rocks during a sudden eruption, officials said. One soldier later died.
The eruption quickly darkened the ski slope at Mount Kusatsu-Shirane with black ash, as volcanic rocks rained down on gondolas and people skiing down the slopes, sending them desperately seeking shelter at a mountaintop station.
The eight soldiers were in a group of 30 who were undergoing ski training and were close to the mountain’s peak when they were hit by the volcanic rocks, defence officials said.
Volcanic ashes cover the slopes of a ski resort in Kusatsu, Gunma prefecture, central Japan, after Mount Kusatsu-Shirane erupted Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018. (Suo Takekuma/Kyodo News via AP)
The officials had originally said the injuries were caused by an avalanche, but later corrected that account.
One of the soldiers, who was slightly injured, said he took refuge in a forest by the ski slope after seeing black smoke and volcanic rocks shooting into the air. When visibility improved about 10 minutes later, he found several fellow soldiers fallen to the ground, Kyodo News reported.
The four civilian skiers did not have life-threatening injuries, Gunma prefectural disaster officials said.
Only the crater had been off-limits because of low-level volcanic activity before Mount Kusatsu-Shirane erupted around 10 a.m. The Japan Meteorological Agency has since banned access to the mountain.
The agency said the eruption and avalanche could not be linked immediately. Snow conditions and seismic activity are some of the possible causes of an avalanche. The eruption occurred in an area considered less at threat from volcanic activity, and officials were caught off guard, agency official Makoto Saito told reporters. No warning had been issued to visitors.
Fire trucks and ambulances are parked at a ski resort in Kusatsu, central Japan, after Mount Kusatsu-Shirane erupted Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018. (Suo Takekuma/Kyodo News via AP)
Defence Minister Itsunori Onodera said five of the eight soldiers were seriously injured. One of them, a 49-year-old male soldier, later died, said Wataru Tatsukawa, an official at the regional military training camp.
Onodera said the training was for rescue operations in the snow, and it was regrettable that those who were supposed to help had to be rescued.
Town officials said everyone on the mountain had been accounted for, and all of about 80 skiers who took refuge at a gondola station at the top of the ski slope were brought down to the foot of the mountain, some by a military helicopter, others by snowmobiles. The rescue operation was finished by the evening.
NHK public television showed the first group of rescued skiers, wearing helmets, being handed a bottle of tea each and escorted into a cabin.
“I was scared to death, and I’m so relieved to come back alive,” an unidentified male skier told NHK, still wearing a helmet. He said he was inside a gondola with two of his friends when the volcano erupted. “Volcanic rocks rained down on the roof of the gondola. It shook so violently that I was afraid the whole thing might smash down on the ground.”
Other skiers said rocks as big as lunch boxes rained down.
An earlier report that some people had been injured by shattered glass when rocks struck a gondola had not been confirmed.
A rest house at the resort was hit by volcanic rocks, but the extent of damage was not known, resort official Yasuaki Morita said.
Kusatsu-Shirane last erupted in 1983. The area is known for Kusatsu Onsen, a famous hot spring resort. Kusatsu town officials said the impact of volcanic eruption was apparently limited to the ski resort, with no ash or volcanic rocks detected in the town, about 5 kilometres (3 miles) from the volcano.
Japan sits on the Pacific “Ring of Fire” and is prone to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. An eruption of Mount Ontake in 2014 killed about 60 people. Several other Japanese volcanos are considered unstable and have had small eruptions in recent years.

12 people injured by flying rocks while skiing on Japanese volcano | Toronto Sun
 
Danbones
#12
At least when its geographic, as opposed to "man maid", it's rocks that fly out.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#13
Do you know explosive man maids?

Perhaps, if you bathed now and then ...
 
spaminator
#14
Erupting Philippine volcano still swelling with magma
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
January 24, 2018
Updated:
January 24, 2018 11:29 PM EST
Mayon volcano spews molten lava during its sporadic eruption early Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018 as seen from a village in Legazpi city. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
LEGAZPI, Philippines — A volcano that’s been erupting for almost two weeks in the Philippines still appears to be swelling with magma under the surface, scientists said Thursday.
More than 74,000 people are staying in dozens of emergency shelters as Mount Mayon continues to belch lava, ash and superheated gas and rocks. Officials are worried the eruption may last months, affecting the education, health and livelihoods of people in its shadow.
The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology said tremors, pyroclastic flows and emissions of sulfur dioxide were detected Wednesday and early Thursday.
Lava erupting up to 500 metres (1,640 feet) high was spilling down the slope, with one lava flow extending 3 kilometres (1.8 miles) from the crater. Ash plumes still rising up to 5 kilometres (3 miles) high have spread ash onto farms and towns nearby, darkening the skies and forcing villagers to wear masks.
The institute said GPS and other measurements indicated a sustained swelling or inflation of the mountain surface, which was consistent with magma rising and creating pressure.
The alert level for Mayon remains four on a scale of five, indicating a violent eruption may be imminent.
There have been no reports of injuries, but law enforcers have struggled to keep villagers and tourists from sneaking into the danger zone, which extends 8 kilometres from the crater.
Although Mayon, in northeastern Albay province, has erupted about 50 times in the last 500 years, it has remained popular among climbers and tourists.
In 2013, an ash eruption killed five climbers who had ventured near the summit despite warnings.
The Philippines has about 22 active volcanoes. The explosion of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 was one of the biggest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century, killing hundreds

Erupting Philippine volcano still swelling with magma | Toronto Sun

74K Philippine villagers displaced as volcano erupts
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
January 24, 2018
Updated:
January 24, 2018 1:26 PM EST
Lava fountaining regularly from the Philippines' most active volcano has flowed up miles from the crater in a dazzling but increasingly dangerous eruption. (Jan. 24)
LEGAZPI, Philippines — An erupting Philippine volcano belched red-hot lava and clouds of ash and debris at least four times Wednesday, prompting the number of displaced villagers to swell to more than 74,000 and causing officials to brace for a humanitarian emergency they fear could last for months.
Mount Mayon has been acting up for more than a week, ejecting ash and lava fountains up to 3 kilometres from the crater in a picturesque but increasingly dangerous eruption. There have been no reports of injuries and law enforcers have struggled to keep villagers and tourists from sneaking into danger zones.
Pyroclastic flows — superheated gas and volcanic debris that could incinerate anything in their path — reached 5 kilometres from the crater in one area, the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology said.
“It’s a logistical nightmare,” Office of Civil Defence regional director Claudio Yucot said of the government’s effort to look after the still-swelling number of evacuees in at least 66 emergency shelters in nine cities and towns in northeastern Albay province, where Mayon lies.
Based on its previous eruptions, Mayon’s restiveness could last from two to four months, prompting Albay and national authorities to take steps to ease the impact on schools, public health and safety, livelihood and law and order, officials said.
Temporary learning centres will be set up in dozens of schools turned into evacuation centres to allow classes to continue, and farm animals will be brought to areas closer to their owners in evacuation camps to prevent more losses to villagers’ livelihoods, Yucot said.
Mayon volcano spews red -hot lava in another eruption as seen from Legazpi city, Albay province, roughly 200 miles (340 kilometers) southeast of Manila, Philippines, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018. Mayon has spewed fountains of red-hot lava and massive ash plumes anew in a dazzling but increasingly dangerous eruption that has sent 56,000 villagers fleeing to evacuation centers.
One town in Albay, Camalig, has already set up an area for rescued farm animals, he said.
Authorities have struggled to prevent villagers from sneaking back to check on their homes and farms, with one official recommending that electricity and water supplies be cut in communities within the no-entry danger zones around Mayon to discourage residents from returning.
Although Mayon has erupted about 50 times in the last 500 years, sometimes violently, it has remained popular among climbers and tourists.
In 2013, an ash eruption killed five climbers who had ventured near the summit despite warnings. Its most destructive eruption, in 1814, killed more than 1,200 people and buried the town of Cagsawa in volcanic mud. The belfry of Cagsawa’s stone church still juts from the ground in an eerie reminder of Mayon’s fury.
Scottish tourist Rachel Rae and her son travelled from their home outside Manila to Albay, lured by the dramatic images of Mayon’s eruption that appeared in the news.
“This is a great opportunity to come and see something that we have never seen before, probably may not have a chance again to do,” Rae said in Cagsawa, where she and her son watched Mayon from a distance.
The Philippines, which has about 22 active volcanoes, lies in the “Ring of Fire,” a line of seismic faults surrounding the Pacific Ocean where earthquakes and volcanic activity are common.
In 1991, Mount Pinatubo in the northern Philippines exploded in one of the biggest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century, killing hundreds of people, covering entire towns and cities in ash and prompting the U.S. government to abandon its vast air and naval bases on the main northern Luzon island.

74K Philippine villagers displaced as volcano erupts | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#15
‘NO MAN’S LAND’: Red-hot Mount Mayon volcano turning towns into ‘permanent danger zones’
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
January 29, 2018
Updated:
January 29, 2018 10:26 AM EST
LEGAZPI, Philippines — The Philippine defence chief has recommended that villages in a danger zone around erupting Mount Mayon be turned into a permanent “no man’s land” to avoid evacuating thousands of residents each time the country’s most active volcano explodes.
President Rodrigo Duterte expressed support for the recommendation of his defence secretary, Delfin Lorenzana, during a meeting Monday with officials dealing with the two-week eruption of Mayon.
This photo taken on January 28, 2018 shows Mayon volcano spewing lava ash from its crater, as seen in Daraga town, south of Manila in Albay province. AFP PHOTO / Ted ALJIBETED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images
But he said the government may have to expropriate land from private owners and added that such a move could spark “a social problem again.”
Mayon has been belching red-hot lava fountains, huge columns of ash and molten rocks into the sky and plunging communities into darkness with falling ash in northeastern Albay province, about 340 kilometres (210 miles) southeast of Manila.
More than 80,000 villagers have fled to dozens of schools turned into emergency shelters, where a lack of toilets and other problems with congestion have emerged.
This photo taken on January 28, 2018 shows local tourists taking photos of Mayon volcano spewing lava ash from its crater, as seen in Daraga town, south of Manila in Albay province. AFP PHOTO / Ted ALJIBETED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images
The proposal is complicated given that thousands of impoverished villagers have settled through the years in a government-declared 6-kilometre (3.7-mile) permanent danger zone around Mayon, where they have survived on farming for generations.
As Mayon grew more restive this month, authorities expanded the danger zone to cover more communities and forced thousands more to swarm into dozens of emergency school shelters. Albay Gov. Al Francis Bichara told the president and other officials that his provincial disaster funds were running low.
Albay officials declared the entire province of more than 1.3 million people under a state of calamity two weeks ago to allow faster releases of disaster funds.
A coconut tree stands alone while steaming lava and pyroclastic deposits are seen at the foot of the Mayon volcano, from the town of Daraga in Albay province on January 28, 2018, as heavy rains pounds areas near the volcano. AFP PHOTO / TED ALJIBETED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images
Duterte ordered the provision of additional funds to deal with the latest crisis he has faced.
“There is actually a permanent danger zone. Why don’t we declare that as a no man’s land so that no people will go there anymore because each time Mayon’s eruption ends residents go back until the next explosion comes,” Lorenzana said.
“We will have always this problem of evacuation.”
A national park in Mayon’s shadow could be expanded around the base of the 8,070-foot (2,460-meter) volcano where trees could grow partly as a buffer to stop volcanic floodwater and mudflows from devastating nearby towns and cities, Lorenzana said.
Mayon volcano is seen spewing ash on January 25, 2018 in Albay, Philippines. (Photo by Jes Aznar/Getty Images)
“The first thing that we have to find out is what would be the solution for people who are there tilling the land which they own and is titled in their name,” Duterte said.
While thousands have evacuated areas around the volcano, villagers have sneaked back in to check on their homes, farms and animals, and police and army troops have struggled to turn back tourists who want a closer view of Mayon.
Mayon, which is famous for its near-perfect cone, has erupted about 50 times in the last 500 years. In 2013, an ash eruption killed five climbers who had ventured near the summit despite warnings.
The Philippines has about 22 active volcanoes. The explosion of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 was one of the biggest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century, killing hundreds.

http://torontosun.com/news/world/no-...t-danger-zones
 
spaminator
#16
TOWER OF ASH: Indonesia’s Sinabung volcano erupts
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
February 19, 2018
Updated:
February 19, 2018 9:59 AM EST
Raw: Indonesian Volcano Blasts Out Tower of Ash 0:56
JAKARTA, Indonesia — Rumbling Mount Sinabung on the Indonesian island of Sumatra shot billowing columns of ash more than 5,000 metres (16,400 feet) into the atmosphere and hot clouds down its slopes on Monday.
There were no fatalities or injuries from the morning eruption, the National Disaster Mitigation Agency said.
Mount Sinabung spews volcanic ash as it erupts in Kutarakyat, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Monday, Feb. 19, 2018. Rumbling Mount Sinabung on the Indonesian island of Sumatra has shot billowing columns of ash more than 5,000 meters (16,400 feet) into the atmosphere and hot clouds down its slopes.
The volcano, one of three currently erupting in Indonesia, was dormant for four centuries before exploding in 2010, killing two people. Another eruption in 2014 killed 16 people, while seven died in a 2016 eruption.
Motorists ride on a road covered in volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Sinabung in Gurukinayan, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Monday, Feb. 19, 2018. Rumbling Mount Sinabung on the Indonesian island of Sumatra has shot billowing columns of ash more than 5,000 meters (16,400 feet) into the atmosphere and hot clouds down its slopes.
Disaster agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said hot ash clouds travelled as far as 4,900 metres southward.
The regional volcanic ash advisory centre in Darwin, Australia, issued a “red notice” to airlines.
Some 30,000 people have been forced to leave homes around the mountain in the past few years.
Mount Sinabung spews volcanic ash as it erupts in Karo, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Monday, Feb. 19, 2018. Rumbling Mount Sinabung on the Indonesian island of Sumatra has shot billowing columns of ash more than 5,000 meters (16,400 feet) into the atmosphere and hot clouds down its slopes. The volcano, one of three currently erupting in Indonesia, was dormant for four centuries before exploding in 2010.
Mount Sinabung is among more than 120 active volcanoes in Indonesia, which is prone to seismic upheaval due to its location on the Pacific “Ring of Fire,” an arc of volcanoes and fault lines encircling the Pacific Basin.

TOWER OF ASH: Indonesia
 
Curious Cdn
#17
Nothing that chucking a virgin into the caldera wouldn't fix.

The trick is, finding a virgin.
 
Danbones
#18
Yes with all the weiners and weinstiens bill clintons running around, there are no virgins LEFT
Right?

LOL, you global warming supporters!

Yeah...virgins would work as well as a carbon tax.

There are well over 450 volcanoes above and below sea level in the ring of fire, and low solar minimums are known to set them all off, which will add to the chemtrails, and in a few years it will be so cold here, and the season will be so short, you won't even be able to grow OLD in Canada.

Geez, several point global temperature drops have come from single volcanoes in the past.
Last edited by Danbones; Feb 20th, 2018 at 06:12 AM..
 
spaminator
#19
NO-GO ZONE: Dormant Japanese volcano blows after 250 years
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
April 20, 2018
Updated:
April 20, 2018 8:06 AM EDT
TOKYO — A volcano in southern Japan has erupted for the first time in 250 years, and authorities set up a no-go zone around the mountain.
Mount Io spewed smoke and ash high into the sky Thursday in its first eruption since 1768. Japan’s Meteorological Agency on Friday expanded a no-go zone to the entire mountain from previously just around the volcano’s crater.
A frame grab taken from TBS TV footage on April 20, 2018 shows a volcanic eruption near Mount Io, part of the Mt. Kirishima group of volcanos, in Miyazaki prefecture, Kyushu on April 19, 2018. (AFP)
Explosions have briefly subsided Friday, but officials cautioned residents in nearby towns against falling volcanic rocks and ash.
The volcano is part of the Kirishima mountain range on Japan’s southern main island of Kyushu. The area is about 1,000 kilometres (620 miles) southwest of Tokyo.
In this April 19, 2018, photo, volcanic smoke billows from Mt. Io, part of the Kirishima mountain range on JapanÂ’s southern main island of Kyushu, taken over Ebino city, Miyazaki prefecture. (Kyodo News via AP)
Another volcano nearby also erupted violently in March for the first time in seven years.
Japan sits on the Pacific “Ring of Fire” and has 110 active volcanoes.

NO-GO ZONE: Dormant Japanese volcano blows after 250 years | Toronto Sun
 
Curious Cdn
#20
Man, the Phillipinos never get a break.
 
bill barilko
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Man, the Phillipinos never get a break.

WTF?

Do you even bother to read the articles as posted?

And check the dates?
 
Danbones
+1
#22
I have worked with some of them, they took the same breaks as the rest of us.
 
captain morgan
+2
#23
More fallout from global warming.

How sad
 
Danbones
+1
#24
failout

(just sayin)
 
petros
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

More fallout from global warming.

How sad

Why is air pressure still 14.69psi after all these years?
 
captain morgan
+1
#26
It's a reflection of the ongoing conspiracy by the air pressure tools manufacturers to hide the reality.

.... And the Illuminati
 
Danbones
+1
#27
Don't be silly, everyone knows it's the planet saving gas tax.

well...the tax is man made.
 
White_Unifier
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Nothing that chucking a virgin into the caldera wouldn't fix.

The trick is, finding a virgin.

Male or female?
 
Curious Cdn
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

Male or female?

True enough. There are one or two male virgins on here posting from their parent's basements.
 
petros
+1
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

.... And the Illuminati

Illuminaughty of them.