I’d love the World Cup even if it was in the third circle of hell


Blackleaf
#1
THE football fan who is tired of the World Cup is tired of life.

How can anyone not feel giddy with excitement that it all kicks off on Thursday?

Yes, the criticism aimed at Russia is all true — from their thuggish fans, to their undemocratic President, to their willingness to assassinate Russian dissidents on British soil.

But the World Cup is bigger than Putin and it is bigger than Russia.

Even in a dodgy host nation, the World Cup is the greatest sporting event on the planet.

Nothing else even comes close.


TONY PARSONS I’d love the World Cup even if it was in the third circle of hell

Sun columnist Tony Parsons has his reservations about the host nation, but he has no reservations about the tournament that is bigger than a diplomatic spat between London and Moscow


COMMENT
By Tony Parsons, Sun Columnist
10th June 2018
The Sun

THE football fan who is tired of the World Cup is tired of life.

How can anyone not feel giddy with excitement that it all kicks off on Thursday?


The FIFA World Cup is the greatest sporting event on the planet - nothing else even comes close, says Tony Parsons

Yes, the criticism aimed at Russia is all true — from their thuggish fans, to their undemocratic President, to their willingness to assassinate Russian dissidents on British soil.

But the World Cup is bigger than Putin and it is bigger than Russia.

Even in a dodgy host nation, the World Cup is the greatest sporting event on the planet.

Nothing else even comes close.

Frankly, I would still be getting out my England flags to attach to the windows of my car if the World Cup was being staged in the third circle of hell — or, even worse, Qatar.


There are two kinds of England fans — the defeatists who always expect us to go home early and deluded romantics such as me who always expect us to win it

England’s group games against Tunisia, Panama and Belgium are in my diary and I believe — indeed, I know — this youthful, swaggering England side, with its thoughtful young manager, will be progressing to the knockout stage.

There are two kinds of England fans — the defeatists who always expect us to go home early and deluded romantics such as me who always expect us to win it.

I still have my reservations about Russia 2018.

I genuinely fear for the safety of law-abiding English football fans.

It would not surprise me if black England players suffer the kind of racist abuse that we have not seen here for 40 years.


Doesn’t it feel like time for England to claim a second star, asks Tony Parsons

And surely there is something deeply disturbing about seeing England play in Vladimir Putin’s country so soon after the nerve gas attack in Salisbury.

But if I have my reservations about the host nation, I have no reservations about the World Cup itself.

The tournament is bigger than a diplomatic spat between London and Moscow.

The highlight of my childhood was seeing Bobby Moore lift the World Cup on a day of sunshine and showers in the summer of 1966.

And even if you were not born in 1966, that image of our golden-haired captain in his red shirt, hoisted on to the shoulders of his ecstatic, exhausted teammates, must be seared in your consciousness for ever.

The memories of 1966 came flooding back when the surviving members of the team assembled on Wednesday for the funeral of Ray Wilson, dead at 83 after his long fight with dementia.

Football’s greatest generation are slipping into history now, and their achievement has become more remarkable in the 52 years that have passed since that magical day.

I expected England to win the World Cup again in Mexico just four years later — 2-0 up against West Germany in the knockout stage, it was a reasonable expectation.

But the dream slipped away in 1970 — West Germany went on to win 3-2 — and England’s World Cup dream has been slipping away for a lifetime, with every new generation of England team found lacking.


England do not have the greatest players or the most experienced manager but then that was true in 1966, says Tony Parsons

I look at the golden stars on the shirts of other World Cup-winning nations — Germany have four now, while Brazil are up to five — and England’s one lonely gold star seems like a poor return for the nation that gave the world its favourite game. Doesn’t it feel like time for England to claim a second gold star?

The anti-England sneering has already begun.

The BBC gleefully reports that sports data company Gracenote give England a four per cent chance of winning in Russia — less chance than Peru.

Brazil, Spain, Germany and Argentina are the favourites to win, but then they always are.

England do not have the greatest players or the most experienced manager but then that was true in 1966, when Pele was in his pomp and Alf Ramsey in his first World Cup.



And for the diehard England fan, hope springs eternal.

Whatever the experts say, this World Cup’s future is unwritten.

In our last friendly before the real thing starts, Manchester United’s Marcus Rashford lit a fire under Gareth Southgate’s young England squad.

It is up to the entire nation to keep that fire burning in Russia.

We are told that only 45 per cent of the young are proud to be English.

They will change their minds when Harry Kane lifts that World Cup on July 15 in Moscow.



https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/649131...ircle-of-hell/
Last edited by Blackleaf; Jun 10th, 2018 at 11:29 AM..
 
Curious Cdn
#2
You are in the third circle of hell.

You're just too stupid to emmigrate.
 
Hoof Hearted
#3
Great!

Two weeks of watching this crap masquerading as entertainment...

 
Blackleaf
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

You are in the third circle of hell.

You're just too stupid to emmigrate.

What country is better than Great Britain to live in?
 
Curious Cdn
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

What country is better than Great Britain to live in?

Most of them ....
 
Hoof Hearted
#6
The Brits all have big yellow teeth and their cellphones are all covered with trace amounts of feces, because they never wash their hands after using the loo.