Newly excavated tools suggest humans lived in North America at least 30,000 years ago


bill barilko
+5
#1  Top Rated Post
Newly excavated tools suggest humans lived in North America at least 30,000 years ago
Artefacts from central Mexico cave are strong evidence humans lived on continent 15,000 years earlier than previously thought
Tools excavated from a cave in central Mexico are strong evidence that humans were living in North America at least 30,000 years ago, some 15,000 years earlier than previously thought, scientists said on Wednesday.
The artefacts, including 1,900 stone tools, showed human occupation of the high-altitude Chiquihuite cave over a 20,000-year period, they reported in two studies published in the journal Nature.
“Our results provide new evidence for the antiquity of humans in the Americas,” Ciprian Ardelean, an archaeologist at the Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas and the lead author of one of the studies, told AFP.
“There are only a few artefacts and a couple of dates from that range,” he said, referring to radiocarbon dating results putting the oldest samples at 33,000 to 31,000 years ago. “However, the presence is there.”
No traces of human bones or DNA were found at the site.
“It is likely that humans used this site on a relatively constant basis, perhaps in recurrent seasonal episodes part of larger migratory cycles,” the study concluded.
The saga of how and when Homo sapiens arrived in the Americas – the last major land mass to be populated by our species – is fiercely debated among experts, and the new findings will probably be contested.
Until recently, the widely accepted storyline was that the first humans to set foot in the Americas crossed a land bridge from present-day Russia to Alaska some 13,5000 years ago and moved south through a corridor between two massive ice sheets.
Archeological evidence – including uniquely crafted spear points used to slay mammoths and other prehistoric megafauna – suggested this founding population, known as Clovis culture, spread across North America, giving rise to distinct native American populations.
But the so-called Clovis-first model has fallen apart over the last two decades with the discovery of several ancient human settlements dating back two or three thousand years earlier.
In the second study published in Nature, evidence from 42 sites around North America indicated human presence dating to at least a time called the Last Glacial Maximum, when ice sheets blanketed much of the continent, about 26,000 to 19,000 years ago and immediately thereafter.
The findings suggest low numbers of people entered the continent earlier than previously understood – some perhaps by boat along a Pacific coastal route rather than crossing the land bridge – and some died out without leaving descendants.
“Clearly, people were in the Americas long before the development of Clovis technology in North America,” said Gruhn, an anthropology professor emerita at the University of Alberta, in comments on the new findings.
The archaeological scientist Lorena Becerra-Valdivia of the University of Oxford in England and the University of New South Wales in Australia – the lead of author of the second article – said the continent’s populations then expanded significantly beginning around 14,700 years ago.
“These are paradigm-shifting results that shape our understanding of the initial dispersal of modern humans into the Americas,” Becerra-Valdivia added.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...-north-america
https://www.france24.com/en/20200722...r-than-thought
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Some here will no doubt have heard of Tom Dillehay and his work in southern Chile that helped push back settlement dates-under fierce assault from entrenched academia; few however know that at the site one of Tom Dillehay’s colleagues, Dr. Mario Pino, claimed a lower layer of the site is 33,200 years old, based on the discovery of burned wood several hundred feet to the south of Monte Verde. Radiocarbon dating established the wood as 33,000 years old.
Then there's Calico Dig which now looks to be 20,000 to 30,000 years old.
 
petros
+4
#2
Africans and Samoans were there long before Beringians.
 
pgs
+3
#3
Great , whose land did they steal ?
 
Ron in Regina
+4
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Africans and Samoans were there long before Beringians.

...& the Chinese & Japanese & Europeans & Middle-Easterners & folks from what is now India, etc...so on and so forth....bodies where coming in from many directions....and the advent of DNA testing is reveling all kinds of cool stuff in places (very remote tribes in the Andes or Amazon Basin or Tierra del Fuego, etc....) with DNA tracing back to far flung places that can't currently be explained otherwise.

(The "Skeletons in the Cupboard Series" of two videos on YouTube is an interesting time killer that ties to Peru & Persia, etc...)
 
Ron in Regina
+2
#5
Has anyone here ever Googled & looked at Olmec Heads?
 
petros
+2
#6
Sure have, they are definitely not Beringians.
 
bill barilko
+3
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

Has anyone here ever Googled & looked at Olmec Heads?

Yes I've even visited some of them in Parque La Venta down in Villahermosa.

It's interesting to see how many local indigenous faces resemble the heads even today.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olmec_...%20Mesoamerica.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilko View Post

[SIZE="5"][b]Newly excavated tools suggest humans lived in North America at least 30,000

Interesting. Thanks for the news.
 
taxslave
+3
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Great , whose land did they steal ?

They didn't. They already owned it and just had to remove the squatters that were occupying the land without paying rent.
 
taxslave
+4
#10
I spent quite a bit of time talking to the Archaeologists I worked with about the concept of much of what we were taught being wrong and the consensus is that many important finds all over the world are ignored or covered up because they do not fit with the mainstream expert view. Apparently one can be drummed out of the profession for holding views contrary to the established experts.
In school in the 50s-60s we were told that Columbus "discovered" America when in fact there were at least two groups that settled here long before his disease ridden ships washed up on our shores. Brennan was one Maddock was another. There is evidence that much of the copper that the Phoenicians used came from the Great Lakes area.But of course we were never told about any of that.
 
Twin_Moose
+2
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

I spent quite a bit of time talking to the Archaeologists I worked with about the concept of much of what we were taught being wrong and the consensus is that many important finds all over the world are ignored or covered up because they do not fit with the mainstream expert view. Apparently one can be drummed out of the profession for holding views contrary to the established experts.
In school in the 50s-60s we were told that Columbus "discovered" America when in fact there were at least two groups that settled here long before his disease ridden ships washed up on our shores. Brennan was one Maddock was another. There is evidence that much of the copper that the Phoenicians used came from the Great Lakes area.But of course we were never told about any of that.

Oh? Much like man made climate change
 
Hoid
#12
This is old news.

Nobody has believed in the land bridge and the 13k years ago theory since the 60s
 
Mowich
+3
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

Has anyone here ever Googled & looked at Olmec Heads?


I actually saw them in person and could almost believe why the guy who wrote Chariots of the Gods thought they might be alien representations, Ron. They are impressive to say the least.
 
Twin_Moose
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

This is old news.
Nobody has believed in the land bridge and the 13k years ago theory since the 60s

So it never existed then?
 
Ron in Regina
+3
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

This is old news.
Nobody has believed in the land bridge and the 13k years ago theory since the 60s

So this isn’t the theory that’s pushed an academic circles above all others to this current day? What do you get predominately when you Google “ human migration routes into the americas” ???
 
Hoid
+1
#16
I took anth101 in 1998?

At that time the Fagan etc all discounted the Land Bridge theory. Mount Verde was discovered in 1975 and ended the Clovis first theory for good and illustrated that an advanced culture had inhabited South America prior to the end of Ice Age.

How could people have come across the Land Bridge and walked all the way to South America and started a culture?

The Americas were peopled by sea. Maritime migration.
Last edited by Hoid; 2 weeks ago at 12:48 PM..
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#17
Can't be both?
 
bill barilko
+3
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Can't be both?

Of course it's both we have only a small picture of the past now and while it will become larger/clearer as time passes & technology advances it's foolish to take a dogmatic stance.

Yet that's just what a lot of academia still does-staking their reputations on 'known truths' and viciously attacking anyone who disagrees.

Twenty years ago a Canadian author named Elaine Dewar wrote about just that-and much more-in her book Bones & it's still germane today

https://www.penguinrandomhouse.ca/bo.../9780679311546

 
taxslave
+2
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Can't be both?

Not if you believe the dogma.
 
Hoid
+1
#20
People could have come across the land bridge 13.5K years ago.

But there was already civilization in South America 30K plus years ago.
 
Twin_Moose
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

People could have come across the land bridge 13.5K years ago.
But there was already civilization in South America 30K plus years ago.

So from where did the Inuit, coastal, and plains natives come from? and how did they cross? If you watched sesame street when you were a kid you would be singing "one of these things ain't like the other" right about now
 
taxslave
+1
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

I took anth101 in 1998?
At that time the Fagan etc all discounted the Land Bridge theory. Mount Verde was discovered in 1975 and ended the Clovis first theory for good and illustrated that an advanced culture had inhabited South America prior to the end of Ice Age.
How could people have come across the Land Bridge and walked all the way to South America and started a culture?
The Americas were peopled by sea. Maritime migration.

DOn't bet on it. There is a good chance there was at least one land bridge or at least a series of close together islands between NA and Europe.
 
Hoid
#23
Things wash up on the shores of BC everyday from asia.

Things wash up on the shores of South America everyday from asia.

Anything that floats can travel from asia to the Americas and have done so for eons.